Draft CTW Assignments

This collection will give you some insight as to how GSU faculty CTW ambassadors are currently thinking about CTW assignments.

As you think about these and rethink your own, a couple of things to consider:

  1. CTW is interested in assessing both student ability and curriculum performance.
  2. A CTW assignment should give a student a chance to both demonstrate and practice his or her ability to think critically in writing.
  3. Revision without insightful feedback is like practice without reflection: useless repetition
  4. A CTW assignment need not be a traditional assignment with a revision cycle. A CTW assignment should emphasize practice in preperation for the traditional assignment
  5. Unless you want your students to learn critical thinking as a process of drafting and revising (which makes sense in some cases), consider short assignments that ask the student to practice a specific cognitive skill, like synthesis or analysis
  6. An effective CTW assignment isolates a specific critical thinking skill and gives the student a chance to practice and improve that skill

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    Major: African-American Studies
    Course Name: Research Methods in African-American Studies
    Assignment:>
    ASSIGNMENT ONE

    Reflexive Researcher Paper (15% - CTW Component)
    This initial written assignment will require students to situate themselves as researcher in a reflexive manner. Students must examine the ways in which they, as researchers, are biased, bound and limited. This submission must meet the following requirements:
    1. No less than three full pages of text
    2. Typed
    3. Double-spaced
    4. 12 point Times New Roman font
    5. 1-inch margins

    The grading criteria for this assignment is as follows:

    1. Does the student use proper formatting (see above)? – 10%.
    2. Does the student identify biases emanating from their personal experiences?-20%.
    3. Does the student identify barriers reflecting their limited experiences? - 20%?
    4. Does the student identify pre-existing assumptions brought to the research/practicum experience? -20%.
    5. Does the student identify strategies for addressing these biases, limitations and assumptions towards a more authentic research/practicum experience? -20%.
    6. Is the paper free from written errors? - 10%

    Initial critiques will not be assigned a grade although I will provide you with feedback. You will have the option of submitting one revision. It is my expectation that the revised submission will more completely meet the criteria.
    Each revision will be generally be due NO LATER THAN one week from the return of the assignment at the start of class.

    ___________________________

    ASSIGNMENT TWO

    Article Annotation and Critique (20%, CTW Component)
    Each student will submit an annotation and critique of six peer-reviewed journal articles. Each article will be identified by the instructor as important to the discipline and/or identified by the student as particularly pertinent to their research project.
    These submissions will provide entry into the more extensive literature review of your research paper. The grading criteria for your annotation and critique are as follows:
    Annotation (20%)
    1. Is the bibliographic information provided in APA format (5%)
    2. Is the purpose of the work identified (thesis/research question,
    (4%)?
    3. Is the methodology clearly described? (3%)
    4. Are the results adequately described? (3%)
    5. Was a hardcopy of article submitted? (5%)

    Critique (80%)

    1. Does the author assess the strength and weakness of the degree to which the article's
    a. literature review;
    b. analysis; and
    c. discussion
    support the conclusions offered by each author (30)%;

    2. Does the author provide specific support from the article for a decision to include or exclude each article from the literature review (30%);
    3. Is there evidence of critical thinking (see rubric) (10%)
    4. Is the article free of written errors? (10%)

    Initial critiques will not be assigned a grade although I will provide you with feedback. You will have the option of submitting one revision of each critique. It is my expectation that each revised submission will more completely meet the criteria.


    Rational:
    Students will respond to prompts that require more than regurgitation. Rather, the questions will require students to fully engage the material and support their answers in a manner that is consistent with the department's definition of critical thinking. Further, resubmissions provide students with additional opportunities to explore the questions in response to instructor feedback.


    Major: African-American Studies
    Course Name: African American Political Thought
    Assignment:>
    (From the syllabus)Comment Papers. The purpose of the comment paper is to assist the student in mastering the week’s required readings and to encourage and develop critical thinking in relation to the assigned readings. The paper will answer three to five questions and provide a critique of the week’s readings. The paper should be between 2-3 typed, double-spaced pages and is due at the beginning of class. In response to critical feedback from the instructor, students will have the opportunity to revise and resubmit each comment paper with the expectation that resubmissions will reflect increased CTW as defined above. Papers will be assessed using a departmental CTW rubric.

    Rational:
    Students will respond to prompts that require more than regurgitation. Rather, the questions will require students to fully engage the material and support their answers in a manner that is consistent with the department's definition of critical thinking. Further, resubmissions provide students with additional opportunities to explore the questions in response to instructor feedback.


    Major: African-American Studies
    Course Name: Seminar and Practicum in African American Studies
    Assignment:>
    Completion of the research paper (50%)

    The primary products of this class are (1)completion of a coherent research project and (2) a well-written research paper that describes this project fully.

    During the course of the semester, the students will submit a series of revisions in response to instructor comments toward the completion of their research papers.

    As with the assignments for 3980, this assignment will require students to "evaluate arguments and truth claims; to discover and overcome personal prejudices; to formulate and present convincing reasons in support of conclusions; and to make reasonable, intelligent decisions about what to believe and what to do” as it relates to the specific requirements of each assignment(Bassham, Irwin, Nardone & Wallace, Critical Thinking: A Student's Introduction (McGraw-Hill, 2005, page 1).

    More specifically, this activity will center the students' own truth claims in critical thinking. While the assignments for 3980 encourage students to critically engage (1) the general biases they bring to the class and (2) pre-existing research that is relevant to their chosen area of interest, 4980 will require them to critically reflect on THEIR OWN truth claims about THEIR research as they pursue a final paper that is accurate, coherent, thoughtful and critical.

    Further, resubmissions provide students with additional opportunities to more fully reflect on and engage their research.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Accounting
    Course Name: Auditing and Assurance Services
    Assignment:>
    Example of Short Assignment (25 course points)
    (To be written at the beginning of class towards the end of the semester)
    Review your responses to the questions on any of the first three quizzes. Select three incorrect responses (use at least 2 different quizzes) and prepare an explanation of why your initial response was incorrect. In particular your discussion should include the following: identify the authoritative support that guides the correct response that you had initially failed to consider; explain the logical error made in your initial response and/or the inappropriate interpretation of the rule/authoritative guidance made in your initial response.

    AC 4610
    Auditing Alchemy Inc. Team Project
    75 points
    Due Date: Beginning of class period as noted on your syllabus

    This project is a simulation of a “walkthrough” procedure that independent auditors perform during an audit of the client’s internal controls over financial reporting. You will adopt the role of an independent audit team responsible for the audit the production process for your client, Alchemy Inc. You will be provided with background materials and view interviews of Alchemy personnel performed by a member of the external audit team. You may take notes and schedule a meeting to replay some of the material (1 meeting per team). You have approximately 6 weeks after the in-class simulation to submit the final team document.

    Required
    1. Using the background materials and management matrix provided by your client and your observations during the simulation complete the attached control matrix for Alchemy Inc., which will be included in the 2007 audit workpapers. Identify missing controls, control weaknesses, items listed as controls but are really procedures etc. Some examples are provided in the attached matrix.

    2. Identify where is there the potential for misstatement due to fraud at Alchemy. Identify the area where the fraud can occur and the type of fraud. Describe the nature of the fraud that can occur and specifically how the fraud can be executed.

    3. Prepare a list of recommendations that you would make to management about their anti-fraud programs. Include the control weakness/deficiency that exists and a recommendation to eliminate each weakness/deficiency identified.

    4. Effective communication is a factor in your grade.
    Effective communication is an important skill for all business majors. This project is intended to comply with the University’s Writing Across the Curriculum and Critical Thinking Through Writing initiatives. As such, organization, logical development, clarity and use of proper grammar will be important factors in your grade.

    5. Allocation of responsibilities and preparation of draft documents.
    The team must allocate writing responsibilities as follows.
    a. No later than one week after the in-class simulation each team member must prepare at least one fraud risk or internal control weakness and the associated recommendation to correct/mitigate the control deficiency/fraud risk identified.
    b. Team members must post their draft memo to the Ulearn group discussion board where the instructor and teammates can review it.
    c. No later than two weeks after the in-class simulation, teammates must complete the rubric evaluating each other’s draft and provide suggestions on how the draft can be improved. All feedback must be posted to the Ulearn group discussion board.
    d. Three weeks after the in-class simulation the team must submit a draft memo to the instructor.
    e. Four weeks after the in-class simulation the instructor will provide feedback to the team using the rubric.


    Rational:
    The assignments provide the opportunity for students to evaluate and critique their own thinking as well as to learn from each other. Students will also provide feedback to help each other acquire CTW skills. In addition, the larger assignment with allow for multiple feedback and drafts before the final project submission. Research provides evidence that learning in teams is one of the most effective means to strengthen students understanding and critical thinking of the course material and that requiring individuals to “self-explain” or make “counter-explanations” strengthens understanding of the topic.


    Major: Art
    Course Name: Art Education for Preschool through 5th Grade
    Assignment:>
    1) READING RESPONSES
    Students will be expected to complete some sort of response, either written or visual, depending upon the assigned text. The responses to the assigned reading will be shared and collected at the start of the following class. LEARNING OUTCOMES: comprehension, communication, appllication, assessment, self-reflection (INTASC Principles 1,6,8,9)

    2) TEACHING PHILOSOPHY
    Each students will draft and revise a 1-2 page personal teaching philosophy that reflects his/her beliefs about the role of art in society and in the current and future lives of students, as well as ideas about the role of the art teacher in the schools. LEARNING OUTCOMES: communication, application, self-reflection (INTASC Principles 6,9)



    Rational:
    same as AE 4900


    Major: Art
    Course Name: Art Theory and Criticism
    Assignment:>
    1) ART CRITICISM PAPER:
    Students will write a critique of an artwork using the analytical model. LEARNING OUTCOMES: Students will move from thinking skills at the lowest level of cognition (knowledge, comprehension) through stages of that require an application of concepts, analysis of design principles as well as other relationships within the artwork, interpretation by synthesizing personal and established knowledge, and making a judgment (evaluation) based on a criteria. The art criticism model is used in several assignments to analyze both fine art and artifacts of visual culture. In the interpretation of artwork students are not expected to necessarily present an argument that is right or wrong, but one that is well reasoned and persuasive.

    2) REFLECTION PAPER:
    Students will write brief reflections of on reading assignments. LEARNING OUTCOMES: students learn to analyze an article and determine the thesis, then provide support of that thesis, then give a personal response and determine the implications for their reading for their teaching (this calls for comprehension, application and synthesis of information).

    3) CREATIVE WRITING:
    Students engage in creating writing thorugh the use metaphor or by assuming another identity. LEARNING OUTCOMES: this assignments require that students analyze the contextual clues of an object or art work to construct (synthesis) a coherent metaphor.




    Rational:
    Students are expected to use all of the critical thinking and writing in lesson plans so they must analyze the components of the art criticism process and then re-construct those elements into the lesson plan model and eventually the art classroom. Art education students must use meta-cognitive skills to think about their thinking and be able to teach those thinking skills to their students.


    Major: Art
    Course Name: Introduction to Art Historical Methodology
    Assignment:>
    1) IMAGE-TEXT PROJECT
    Students will be giving a list of ten descriptive words for which they must 1) locate a definition; 2) find a visual image that relates to the definition they've chosen; and 3) analyze the relationship between the definition and the visual image. Students will share their findings in class; as a group they will be asked to reflect more generally on the differences between visual images and textual descriptions. LEARNING OUTCOMES: knowledge, application, synthesis, evaluation.

    2) READING SUMMARIES / IN-CLASS WRITING:
    During the semester students will complete several informal writing assignments that include reading summaries and in-class writing projects. LEARNING OUTCOMES: knowledge, comprehension, analysis,synthesis, evaluation.

    2a) SAMPLE IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENT
    A three-part assignment completed over two class periods: Students will jot down their initial impressions of an unfamiliar work of art; then they will compare their responses to that of an "expert;" last, they will read the artist's statement of intent and reflect on the relation between intention and reception, as well as the nature of the interpretative process. LEARNING OUTCOMES: synthesis, evaluation.

    3) RESEARCH PAPER:
    The 10-page research paper will be a semester-long project. Students are required to turn in a rough draft; failure to do so will lower their final paper grade by 15%. LEARNING OUTCOMES: comprehension, application, synthesis, evaluation.



    Rational:
    The successful completion of these CTW assignments will demonstrate that students have:
    1) practiced and applied reading comprehension skills.
    2) evaluated and formulated critical interpretations of works of art and art historical material.
    3) organized, assessed and synthesized source material in the production of original written work.
    4) revised written work.
    5) applied prior knowledge to new problems or contexts related to the discipline.


    Major: Art
    Course Name: Art History Capstone
    Assignment:>
    1) REFLECTION PAPER
    Students will write a 3 – 5 page narrative paper reflecting on their academic experiences as an art history major. LEARNING OUTCOMES: synthesis, self-evaluation.

    2) PAPER REWRITE FOR AN ORAL PRESENTATION
    Students will rewrite a term paper into a format appropriate for a 15-minute formal presentation. LEARNING OUTCOMES: comprehension, revision, evaluation.

    3) WRITE ABSTRACT OF OTHER STUDENT'S PAPER
    After the formal presentations, students will then write a short abstract for the paper of one of their peers. LEARNING OUTCOMES: comprehension, synthesis.

    Rational:
    same as AH 3000


    Major: Applied Linguistics
    Course Name: Language in Society
    Assignment:>
    African American English in Schools

    High schools in your school district have a large percentage of students who are monodialectal speakers of African-American English (AAE). Other students in the school district are monodialectal in non-stigmatized dialects of English, and a small percentage of students are bidialectal in AAE and a non-stigmatized dialect. Members of the school board are trying to decide what the school policy should be in terms of what dialects are taught or used in class. You know that some school board members are in favor of totally immersing all students in a variety of non-stigmatized English and correcting all uses of AAE, while others argue that AAE speakers should be encouraged to become bidialectal; that is, learn a non-stigmatized dialect for use in certain situations. What educational policy do you recommend? (You may put forward your own policy or choose one of those already favored by some board members.) What is your basis for choosing this policy, and what is your assessment of the policies you did not choose?


    Rational:
    This assignment, like the other (to be designed) homework assignments for the course, requires students to make a recommendation for addressing a common, real-world issue that involves prejudice, based on linguistic principles. Students will be provided with the rubric used to assess their work at the beginning of the semester, and essentially the same rubric will be used to assess all homework assignments (with some tweaking for individual assignments if appropriate). This will allow students to practice addressing different sociolinguistic issues in similar formats, so that they will have the opportunity to improve on their weaknesses in writing their next assignment.


    Major: Applied Linguistics
    Course Name: Communication Across Cultures
    Assignment:>
    Midterm and Final Reflective Essay Guidelines

    For the midterm essay: Using your classroom observation notes, compose a 3 to 4-page essay focusing on your reflections so far on your cooperating teacher’s teaching style and interactions with students. Conclude with a brief summative statement about what you have learned so far from your observation experience. Please note: you will be submitting two drafts of the midterm essay, the first of which will benefit from peer review. Training for peer review, i.e., how to effectively respond to a peer’s writing and how to take advantage of peer feedback, will be provided in class.

    Your final essay (approximately 10 pages) should be a culmination of all that you have learned about L2 teaching from your classroom observations, microteaching, and 4161 readings. Feel free to include anything relevant from our class discussion (online or face-to-face) and from your midterm essay. Please note: as with the midterm essay, you will be submitting two drafts of the final essay, the first of which will undergo peer review.

    Recommended outline for final essay:
    1. Introduction (one page or less)
    a. Observation site/s background information
    b. Overview of the rest of the essay
    2. Reflections on cooperating teacher’s teaching style and your own volunteer tutoring/teaching experience vis-à-vis Harmer’s advice on teaching (approximately 3 pages). Feel free to focus selectively on a-d.
    a. Speaking/Listening
    b. Reading/Writing
    c. Grammar/Vocabulary
    d. Culture
    3. Reflective observations on student behavior/performance/interactions styles vis-à-vis information in relevant sections in Harmer, Richards, or any other class readings (approximately 3 pages).
    a. Focus on class as a whole
    b. Or focus on selected individual students
    c. Or some combination of a & b
    4. Thoughts on your own emerging teaching style, philosophy of teaching, and goals for student-teacher interaction. This section should be informed by your reflective observations of teaching, your response to readings, and critical self-reflection (approximately 3 pages).
    5. Conclusion (one paragraph)
    a. Where you see yourself going, i.e., plans for the future
    b. What you see yourself still needing to learn
    c. Any other final thoughts


    Rational:
    These assignments require students to critically reflect on teaching, addressing challenging aspects of teaching linguistically and culturally diverse learners in language classes, and identifying the goals and assumptions that underlie different approaches to teaching such learners. Students have the opportunity to revise each essay after receiving peer feedback.


    Major: Applied Linguistics
    Course Name: Senior Seminar in Applied Linguistics
    Assignment:>
    In this course you will explore a topic of your choice related to applied linguistics. Examples of acceptable projects include library research on the structure and history of a specific language, a case study of an individual language learner, survey research on attitudes towards speakers of specific languages or dialects, etc. With permission of the instructor you may expand on a project carried out as a requirement for a previous course. You will turn in a project proposal, a first draft, and a final version of your paper. You will also provide written and oral feedback to one or more peers on their projects during the semester.

    Rational:
    This assignment requires students to evaluate arguments and present the rationale behind the conclusions drawn. Depending on the topic, the paper may also address personal prejudices and make reasonable, intelligent decisions about how to address real-world language-oriented controversies. Students have the opportunity to revise the paper after receiving peer feedback.


    Major: Anthropology
    Course Name: Anthropology of Violence
    Assignment:>
    The course is organized in sections, each of which will consist of one or more modules focusing on different topics and approaches to the topic of violence.

    At the end of each module, students will have to write a 4-5 pages paper where they critically examine the topic of the module and respond to, or elaborate on, assigned readings, lectures, and classroom discussions. The course instructor will give them written feedback, which they will incorporate in the revised version of their papers.

    At the end of the semester, students will be required to turn in a portfolio with all of their revised papers.

    70% of the course fulfills the CTW requirement.


    Rational:
    Rewriting module papers and turning them into a portfolio will provide students with opportunities to critically explore anthropologically relevant issues as they hone their writing skills.


    Major: Anthropology
    Course Name: Senior Seminar
    Assignment:>
    Assignment 1: Theory and Method

    Choose an article in your preferred field of anthropology. It can be an article you’ve read before for another class or an article that is new to you, but it must be in a peer-reviewed publication within the discipline of anthropology. In a 2-3 page essay, discuss the content of the article very briefly, then discuss the theoretical basis of the article (what theory or theorists are cited?), how theory is important to the findings or conclusions of the researcher, what methods are being used, how methods relate to theory (if applicable), and how well, in your opinion, the author did in terms of incorporating theory into his/her conclusions. Note that whereas major theories you are familiar with may not be referenced, there is probably still a theoretical basis to the article. Make sure to include a full citation for the article.

    Assignment 4, Mini journal article, due March 28

    For this assignment, you will reformulate and edit a paper you have written for another anthropology class in the past into a format that would be acceptable for the journal American Anthropologist. You can write the paper on the same topic as your oral presentation if you wish. Use the following style guide to format references: http://www.aaanet.org/pubs/style_guide.htm
    You can look at other American Anthropologist articles on JSTOR through our library’s computer system for samples; here is their basic format for submission of articles, essays, and research reports (notes, figures, and tables are not necessary):

    Submissions must include the following: (1) a cover page with paper title, author’s name, position, affiliation, and contact information, and a preferred running head; (2) an abstract of no more than 150 words ending with a bracketed list of three to five keywords or phrases; (3) body of the text; (4) notes, which may include acknowledgments before the first note (do not use footnote or endnote programs, and references should not be embedded); (5) references cited; (6) tables, if applicable; (7) figures, if applicable, accompanied by a list of figure captions.

    For further info on American Anthropologist author guidelines, see: http://www.aaanet.org/aa/authorinfo.htm

    Use American Anthropologist Research Reports or Research Articles as models, although your paper need not be more than 3-4 pages total (though it can be longer). You should have at least 3 bibliographic references. The paper does not have to be based on original research, but as with your abstract and future oral presentation, you should attempt to offer a new take or new insight on the material about which you are writing. You should go beyond simply fitting your paper to the format of the journal and focus on improving your writing and your arguments, perhaps based on comments you received on the paper. You will also be expected to complete two revisions of the paper based on comments I provide.

    Assignment 5: Mini-hypothetical grant proposal

    For this assignment, you will compose a grant proposal for a hypothetical research project following the guidelines below. You can be creative in suggesting your project topic, though the idea should be your own and it should relate to one or more of the four fields of anthropology. If you have not completed preliminary research on the topic you suggest, do some research about the location where you plan to study, about possible contacts you might make in the field, and about what the country requirements are for U.S. citizens (if you propose to conduct research outside of the U.S.), etc.

    Grant proposal guidelines: Arrange your proposal into the following sections:

    I. Title

    II. Statement of Purpose (1 paragraph)
    What is your project topic and where will it be conducted? What questions are you trying to answer? Why is the research important? What is new or innovative about this research?

    III. Background Research and Theoretical Approach (2-3 paragraphs)
    Who else has done research on topics related to your research problem? Whose work is relevant to your research? (Citations should be including for any works mentioned). What theories will inform the research you plan to conduct?

    IV. Research Setting (1 paragraph)
    Where will the research take place? Why is this location particularly significant in terms of your research questions?

    V. Methodology (1-2 paragraphs)
    Include a detailed summary about the methods you will use to collect and analyze your data. For example, what sampling techniques will you use, if any? What technology might be required to complete your project? How much time will the project require? Will you work alone or with assistants? Will your ability to speak another language be required to complete this research? Are there special permissions that need to be sought to conduct research on this topic or in this region?

    VI. Significance of Project (1 paragraph)
    Here you will not only reiterate the importance of the research, but also you may point out some of the possible applications of the research.

    VI. Budget
    Itemize the cost of this project. Here is a guide for items you might include:
    Travel expenses:
    Equipment/Technology needed (give details of each item):
    Estimated living expenses:
    Cost of hiring workers/assistants (if applicable):
    Other:

    VII. Bibliography



    Rational:
    Through these assignments, graduating majors will explore a variety of intellectual challenges as well as writing genres and styles that pertain to the domains of academic and professional anthropology. Multiple revisions of assignments will be encouraged and, in some cases, required.

    30% of the course fulfills the CTW requirement.


    Major: Anthropology
    Course Name: Selected Topics
    Assignment:>
    The course is organized in sections, each of which will consist of one or more modules focusing on different issues and approaches to the course topic.

    At the end of each module, students will have to write a 4-5 pages paper where they critically examine the topic of the module and respond to, or elaborate on, assigned readings, lectures, and classroom discussions. The instructor will give them written feedback, which they will incorporate in the revised version of their papers.

    At the end of the semester, students will be required to turn in a portfolio with all of their revised papers.

    Grading Policy:

    Grades will be assigned as follows:

    Course participation and attendance: 30%

    Module papers (CTW): 40%

    Course Portfolio (CTW) 30%


    Rational:
    Rewriting module papers and turning them into a portfolio will provide students with opportunities to critically explore anthropologically relevant issues as they hone their writing skills.


    Major: Art-Studio
    Course Name: Introductory Studio
    Assignment:>
    ART 1050 / Introductory Studio
    Fall 2008

    Critical Thinking through Writing (CTW) Assignments

    Each CTW assignment will be 2-3 pages, double spaced with a 12 point font. The writing must include of an intelligent and informed reaction to and analysis of the article(s). This means that you must go beyond mere reporting of the ideas presented in the article(s) and, through critical thinking, arrive at your own ideas about what is significant. This is imperative and where the greatest weight is placed in terms of assessment. What do you personally think about what is discussed in the article(s)? What do you think the important critical issues are? How do you respond to the ideas of others contained in the article(s)? Be specific as to the whys and why nots.


    Writing Assignment #1
    Ready-Made Oracle

    Read Allan Kaprow’s Art Which Can’t Be Art and the article on his Trading Dirt. Research some of the other artists listed as examples. In your writing address the concept of the ready-made, assemblage and/or performance art. Sample questions: What can be art? What are the advantages of these forms when producing art as social commentary?


    Writing Assignment #2
    12-Step Program

    Read excerpts from DO IT and the article on Sol Lewitt. Using these and the initial experience of writing a set of instructions and carrying out another set of instructions for making an artwork to discuss the question - “who is the artist?” Is this a valid question?


    Writing Assignment #3
    12-Step Program Rewrite

    Use the feedback from the last writing assignment and your continued project research to reassess, rethink and rewrite your conclusions. This further analysis should be tighter and more complete than the previous version.



    Rational:
    Rationale: The successful completion of the CTW assignments will demonstrate that students have:
    1) formulated critical interpretations that apply to their personal studio work
    2) evaluated and formulated contextual understandings in relation to historical and contemporary art production
    3) researched, organized, assessed and synthesized material to support their analysis of critical issues in art
    4) identified concepts expressed through an artistic medium
    5) gained insight into their creative process
    6) refined their critical thinking through writing drafts for revision


    Major: Art-Studio
    Course Name: Critical Issues in Contemporary Art
    Assignment:>
    Assignment #1: Discuss the political and cultural issues related to Robert Mapplethorpe's "The Black Body" project.

    Assignment #2: Discuss Karrie Hovey's "Silo Series" in terms of contemporary consumer culture.

    Assignment #3: Discuss the video "Manufactured Landscapes" in relation to globalism.

    Rational:
    The course is designed to help students identify the critical issues of a work of art within a social, cultural, and political context; provide insightful analysis of a work of art; and organize a clear and logical written statement to support their claims about a work of art with proper grammar. Students completing these assignments will gain an understanding of the processes and critical debates that inform contemporary art practice, and will have participated in a close study of the work of leading contemporary artists and their antecedents. This knowledge will further their ability to place their own work, and the work of others, in a contemporary art and theoretical context, and to more effectively develop their own personal studio work as they pursue their BA and BFA Studio Art majors.



    Major: Art-Studio
    Course Name: Directed Study
    Assignment:>
    Written Artist Statement (CTW Component) (20 points)

    Your artist statement must use clear language with proper grammar, spelling and punctuation. It should convey the basic ideas of your work and how those ideas are embodied in the work. A good artist statement will provide insight into the work and further the viewers' understanding of the artist's connection to the work. You will have an opportunity to write several drafts in order to arrive at an effective statement at the end of the course.



    Rational:
    Rationale: The successful completion of the CTW assignments will demonstrate that students have:
    1) formulated critical interpretations that apply to their personal studio work
    2) evaluated and formulated contextual understandings in relation to historical and contemporary art production
    3) researched, organized, assessed and synthesized material to support their analysis of critical issues in art
    4) identified concepts expressed through an artistic medium
    5) gained insight into their creative process
    6) refined their critical thinking through writing drafts for revision


    Major: Art-Studio
    Course Name: Portfolio II
    Assignment:>
    4950 / Portfolio II:
    Written Artist Statement (CTW Assignment)
    Your artist statement must use clear language with proper grammar, spelling and punctuation. It should convey the basic ideas of your work and how those ideas are embodied in the work. A good artist statement will provide insight into the work and further the viewers' understanding of the artist's connection to the subject. You will have an opportunity to work on several drafts of your statement in order to arrive at a strong statement at the end of the course.



    Rational:
    Rationale: The successful completion of the CTW assignments will demonstrate that students have:
    1) formulated critical interpretations that apply to their personal studio work
    2) evaluated and formulated contextual understandings in relation to historical and contemporary art production
    3) researched, organized, assessed and synthesized material to support their analysis of critical issues in art
    4) identified concepts expressed through an artistic medium
    5) gained insight into their creative process
    6) refined their critical thinking through writing drafts for revision


    Major: Biology
    Course Name: Molecular Cell Biology
    Assignment:>
    1. Students will make diagrams of the methods for their experiments. They will then write a paragraph in their own words describing the protocol.

    2. Students will write logical, succinct and specific conclusions for data they have generated in their laboratory experiments.

    3. Students will write two complete lab reports for experiments performed in the lab.


    Rational:
    #1 Students have a hard time visualizing setting up an experiment, having students make a diagram and write in their own words what they will do before they do it, will help students more critically analyze the experimental approach and logistical issues surrounding performance of experiments.

    #2 Students feel that there is one "right answer" to the experiments and therefore, they usually write their conclusions accordingly. Thus, we strive to make them more critically analyze their data and make reasonable conclusions based on the data and not on their preconceived notions of what the "right answer" should be.

    #3 Students do not have many experiences in writing lab reports so they will get the opportunity to critically analyze and synthesize all of the data with what is already known in the field and then suggest future experiments.


    Major: Biology
    Course Name: Biology Seminar
    Assignment:>
    #1 Students will receive figures from a primary literature paper. Students will write short descriptions/captions for figures in the paper.

    #2 Students will not be provided the abstract for a primary literature paper. After reading the paper, students will write an abstract.

    #3 Students will attend seminars in biology and write critical questions for the speakers.

    #4 Students will attend seminars in biology and write mini-proposals for future research in that field of biology.

    Rational:
    #1 Students tend to read papers, ignoring the figures so they do not assess the validity of the statements in the paper by looking at the data. This assignment should help them learn to analyze the data.

    #2 Students have a hard time synthesizing and summarizing lots of information. By making students condense the paper to one paragraph, these assignments will enhance their critical thinking skills.

    #3 Same #1.

    #4 Students get practice researching, developing a proposal and defending it using persuasive evidence and data to justify getting "funding" to perform a particular study.


    Major: Birth through Five
    Course Name: Professional and Ethical Practice
    Assignment:>
    Assignment #1 Professional Reflection/Quick Writes (CTW Course Requirement)
    • Reflect upon and develop his/her professional practice and professional development. (NAEYC, DEC)
    • Adhere to the professional code of ethical conduct. (DEC)
    • Identify the ethical and policy issues related to services for young children and their families. (DEC)

    A. Students will complete three (3) “Quick Writes” over the course of the semester. (See attached course calendar.) The Quick Writes provide the opportunity to use critical thinking and apply the readings and in-class experiences to new situations that require thoughtful analysis, evaluation and application.

    B. Students will receive a “writing prompt or scenario” for each Quick Write. For example, a prompt may ask you to write a letter to your legislator supporting a childcare funding bill. The first draft of each Quick Write will be completed in class over 20-30 minutes. The draft will be turned in to the instructor who will use a rubric to provide feedback and suggestions for improvement directly on the draft. The student will resubmit the second draft to the instructor by an assigned due date. A final grade will be awarded to the second, resubmitted draft. FINAL DRAFTS DUE April 21

    C. Each Quick Write/reflection final draft must be a minimum of one full page (12 pt. font, double space for the final draft). Your responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of professional standards, ethics, the NAEYC code of Ethical Conduct and concepts and vocabulary from your GSU class experience.


    Rational:


    Major: Birth Through Five
    Course Name: Language, Literacy, and Cognition
    Assignment:>
    Assignment #1
    Examining the Relation among Children’s Early Language and Literacy Development: Critical Thinking through Writing
    Purpose: This paper is designed to assist you in building your knowledge about children’s development of meaning based and code based early literacy skills. Using the “constrained” and “unconstrained” skills argument forwarded by Paris (2005; 2009), students will examine the veracity of the relative importance that both sets of skills have on children’s early literacy and language development. As part of this paper, students will integrate this argument with other research on children’s early literacy development to examine how teachers should include both wholistic views of literacy instruction with the relative importance of explicitly teaching skills in phonics. The following rubric will be used to assess student’s papers.

    Assignment #2
    Literacy Assessment Paper

    Task: Students will find, read, summarize and reflect on an article related to issues of assessing young children’s early literacy development. Articles should be located through the library using either PsychInfo or ERIC databases. The summary and reflection should be formalized into a typed double spaced report no more than 5 pages in length. Please note that your reflection should not be a regurgitation of what the authors wrote but rather a thorough examination of the article with attention to what we have discussed in class and what you have read. Use the following guidelines below and the literacy assessment rubric to guide your paper.

    Include the Following in Your Paper:
    1. Summary
    a. Your summary should briefly and clearly communicate the main ideas in this article (be careful not to plagiarize as discussed in class) and your reflection should include your response to/thinking about the issues the author(s) raise. Do you agree or disagree with what is stated and why? Did the authors do a significant job vetting the material? What in particular do you think is good and/or problematic about the issues raised? Are the issues too idealistic–that is, has an unrealistic standard for assessing children been set by this writer (i.e., are they practical or doable)?
    2. Address issues that may relate to diverse students that may or may not have been addressed in the article. Does the author raise issues of contextual or cultural background as an important aspect of assessment? What is your own experience with diversity issues in the classroom and how does your experience resonate or not with the assertions of the article.
    3. If the authors failed to address diversity issues, how might the author’s argument or position be viewed with this information in mind?
    4. How did the authors attend to the issue of how young children’s development is fluid? Do they recognize the challenges of assessing young learners?
    5. Make sure to use APA style for all references. If you are unfamiliar with APA, we can spend some time in class or in an individual meeting learning this style.
    6. Please make sure to proofread your paper carefully. Correct grammar and spelling is very important to ensuring that your ideas are properly represented.


    Rational:
    BRFV 4370 is one of two courses in the Birth Through Five program that incorporate university requirements for critical thinking through writing (BRFV 3250: Professional and Ethical Practice is the other course). The goals of the CTW initiative are outlined on the website: http://www.gsu.edu/ctw/25449.html and each CTW course is offers… “assignments that use writing to help students develop the wide range of cognitive skills and intellectual dispositions needed to effectively identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments and truth claims; to discover and overcome personal prejudices; to formulate and present convincing reasons in support of conclusions; and to make reasonable, intelligent decisions about what to believe and what to do.” (Bassham, Irwin, Nardone & Wallace, Critical Thinking: A Student's Introduction (McGraw-Hill, 2005) page 1.) For both CTW assignments in BRFV 4370, students will have the opportunity to analyze research articles and critically write about these issues as they pertain to young children's language and early literacy development.


    Major: Business Administration
    Course Name: Globalization and Business Practices
    Assignment:>
    International Newspaper Reports (INR): Once during the semester, you will need to find an article from a newspaper in the country/region you have been assigned. The article must relate to a topic covered in chapters 1-8. In 2 ½ to 3 pages, double-spaced and typed, your INR should cover these three parts:
    1) Article Summary,
    2) Relevance to Chapter “X,”
    3) Critique and Insight. (content and reporting)
    The article you select must be about a news-worthy event or an analysis or commentary on a current topic that meets the relevancy criterion. Examples of ineligible articles are press releases, new product announcements and short, one or two paragraph items about “news in general.” Select an article of substance that discusses a topic in depth from local point(s) of view. In your own words, briefly summarize the article; explain how it relates to the modules covered and provide your own critical analysis and additional insight into the subject of the article.
    In addition, you need to evaluate the article as a piece of journalism. In other words, how well did the reporter do in covering the story. What are the shortcomings of the article?
    The review must be written in first person (use the pronoun “I”). Attach a hard copy of the article to your INR. Please refer to the course schedule for due dates. You are encouraged to share interesting and provocative articles in class or through the discussion board on uLearn. Remember, you will be the “expert” on the country that you have been assigned. Sample INRs are available in the International Newspaper Reports section at uLearn. Suggested international newspaper directory websites: http://www.kidon.com/media-link/index.shtml; http://emedia1.mediainfo.com/emedia/; http://www.southamerica-business.com/newspapers/ and http://www.thepaperboy.com/welcome.html Please do your own thorough research to identify good English-language newspaper(s) from your country. Do not use the following sources for your INRs: Financial Times, New York Times, WSJ (all editions), Deutsche Welle, Kyodo, Bloomberg, International Herald Tribune or CNN, unless you cannot find an English-language article and have your instructor’s approval. The requirement is to learn about news, analysis and commentary from a local point of view, not from global news wire services.


    Rational:
    The Institute of International Business does not offer an undergraduate major. However, it does provide a core required course for all RCB students. This course is the one being used for the first phase of CTW. Each department will offer the higher level discipline-specific CTW course.


    Major: Chemistry
    Course Name: Fundamentals of Chemical Analysis
    Assignment:>
    Sample assignment taken from the Chem 4000 laboratory manual.
    Background: The first three lectures in chemistry 4000 are on statistics and how a chemist should report numerical data in a scientific journal. Detailed descriptions of error propagation, measures of central tendency and measures of dispersion are described and several problems worked out. The class then shifts to the big question “How do I tell whether two numbers are statistically the same or statistically different?” Several cases are explored using the Q –test , F-test and t-test.

    Laboratory – Students are given two bottles (A and B) which contain a light absorbing species (dye). Students are instructed to dilute this dye so that the absorbance reading is at the detection limit of the spectrometer. Using 10 independent dye samples at the sample dilution for each dye students must answer the question “Are the concentrations of dye A and dye B the same statistically or different?”

    Students then take the absorbance of the each of the dyes at 10 different dilution factors and perform a linear least squares analysis on the data to determine whether the slopes of the lines are the same or different. Again the question “Are the concentrations of dye A and dye B the same statistically or different?” must be answered.

    A students’ critical thinking ability is assessed based on the following. How did the student use Beer’s law and error analysis to determine whether the dyes were the same or different. What is the range of the “true mean” at the 95% confidence level. How well did the student establish the correct relationship between the concentrations of the solutions and the analysis of uncertainties.


    Rational:
    Critical thinking skills center on applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information and methods. Students need thorough practical training in research techniques. These must include not only mastery of instrumentation and the calibration of same, but the design of the relevant control experiments. Overall, they need to gain mastery with the techniques that chemists use to measure data, and the conventions that chemists use to express data. Students must learn to evaluate their data, looking in detail for statistical significance.
    Students not only have to know facts, they should also be able to design experiments to ascertain if these facts are true. It is vital that the skills learned in one situation be transferable to related situations.
    One of the key aspects of teaching critical thinking is developing the higher order cognitive skills of decision making and problem solving. It is vital to create an atmosphere where students grow in their ability to reason. Students need to take and analyze real world data to develop a knowledge base and the ability to draw conclusions from this knowledge base. Thought processes should be rational, logical and consequential. Conclusions should grow directly from the data and accepted fundamental chemical principles. In addition, students should not only arrive at conclusions, but be aware that they are expected to defend these conclusions. It is also important to realize that data may be interpreted in more than one way, and that science moves forward as these difference data interpretations clash with one another, and are then resolved. Students must therefore learn to deal with open ended questions, deciding which data and variables are important, and which can safely be ignored in creating a picture of the system under study.
    The ability to think critically about scientific content and processes is key to these students’ futures. Critical thinking over time should become an internal skill, transferable to the rest of the student’s life and career.


    Major: Chemistry
    Course Name: Chemical Laboratory IV(A)
    Assignment:>
    *** Note that each student gets a unique assignment relating to their instructor's research interest all students must complete a single paper to the instructor's satisfaction before receiving a grade. Below is a sample assignment from 2005***

    An Investigation of the Thermodynamics of the Binding of Different Metal-TMPyP4 Compounds to Synthetic DNA

    Irradiating certain metaloporphrins with x-rays causes a cascade of high energy electrons to be released. In this investigation (in which several undergraduate students along with graduate students and post-doctoral associates) the feasibility of a treatment for prostate cancer was investigated. Students were required to make appropriate buffers for experiments learn to use UV-vis spectrophotometers and interpret the specta, use and interpret the data from calorimetric experiments, run photon activation therapy experiments on acrylamide gels containing circular wound DNA with the different M-TMPyP4 compounds.
    The UV vis data was analyzed to determine whether plating occurred at 24 36 hrs. If plating occurred then the students had to determine the effective concentration of the porphyrin at different times. The calorimetric data was analyzed to determine the number of binding sites on the DNA along with the energetics of the process including enthalpy, entropy and Gibb’s free energy changes associated with the process. Van’t Hoff plots were attempted to determine the number of processes that were present and whether they could be determined to be the same or different interactions depending on the temperature. The photon activation therapy experiments were used to determine whether circular DNA was nicked, broken or remained intact when in the presence of the porphorin and an x-ray source.
    All students taking 4160 with this project turned in a single paper which included the experimental and a discussion of the results in which they had to interpret the data that they had obtained throughout the semester.





    Rational:
    Critical thinking skills center on applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information and methods. Students need thorough practical training in research techniques. These must include not only mastery of instrumentation and the calibration of same, but the design of the relevant control experiments. Overall, they need to gain mastery with the techniques that chemists use to measure data, and the conventions that chemists use to express data. Students must learn to evaluate their data, looking in detail for statistical significance.
    Students not only have to know facts, they should also be able to design experiments to ascertain if these facts are true. It is vital that the skills learned in one situation be transferable to related situations.
    One of the key aspects of teaching critical thinking is developing the higher order cognitive skills of decision making and problem solving. It is vital to create an atmosphere where students grow in their ability to reason. Students need to take and analyze real world data to develop a knowledge base and the ability to draw conclusions from this knowledge base. Thought processes should be rational, logical and consequential. Conclusions should grow directly from the data and accepted fundamental chemical principles. In addition, students should not only arrive at conclusions, but be aware that they are expected to defend these conclusions. It is also important to realize that data may be interpreted in more than one way, and that science moves forward as these difference data interpretations clash with one another, and are then resolved. Students must therefore learn to deal with open ended questions, deciding which data and variables are important, and which can safely be ignored in creating a picture of the system under study.
    The ability to think critically about scientific content and processes is key to these students’ futures. Critical thinking over time should become an internal skill, transferable to the rest of the student’s life and career.


    Major: Computer Information Systems
    Course Name: Systems Analysis
    Assignment:>
    CIS 3300 PRELIMINARY PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    You are required to conduct an object-oriented systems analysis modeling project for some organizational information system of your choosing.

    To get started, you need to think of an appropriate information system and organizational setting for your application. You will need to describe this in narrative form to be submitted with your project. What is the business? How is the industry characterized? What are the products/services of this business? What are the business mission, goals and objectives? How does the information system ‘move’ the organization towards its goals and objectives?

    ENHANCED PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    Please continue to develop your initial project description. Submit to me a longer written description of your intended project. Some things you might consider and include (if you have not already) are:

    1) A one page narrative description of the purpose, goals, and scope of the intended system.
    2) A “shopping list” of requirements. This might take the form of a bulletized list of the 8 or 10 or 12 most important functional requirements of the system.
    3) A preliminary domain model. That is, identify the most important 8 or 10 classes in the problem domain. What are the most important classes for your system?
    4) Actors and Use Cases. Make a list of the salient actors. Provide a very brief description of each. Make a list of the salient high-level Use Cases. Provide a description of each. For the “most important” one or two Use Cases, you might take a stab at fleshing out a preliminary “fully dressed” Use Case.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Computer Information Systems
    Course Name: System Development Projects
    Assignment:>
    From the syllabus above - much of the documentation that they students develop is written. This is where we propose to incorporate the ctw assessments. We have developed a rubric for this purpose. We highlight these documentation assignments in the excerpt from the syllabus below:

    Course Objectives
    This course is designed to provide the student experience in working with a client organization to perform systems analysis and design from the initial request through a final design and prototype. In doing this, the student will demonstrate his/her ability to :

    • Define project scope, assess feasibility, and establish a project schedule.

    • Develop specifications for system requirements.

    • Prepare and present both written and oral reports to the faculty and the client organization.

    Method of Instruction

    There will be interim project milestones and deliverables during the course to ensure that each project is progressing on schedule. On each due date, each team will submit a written report of the total project to date, and give a class presentation that updates the class on their progress.

    At the end of the course, and after approval by the Course Director, each team will arrange a final presentation for their client, in which they will present the prototype and appropriate documentation.




    Rational:
    The CTW implementation plan for the BBA in CIS would be embedded in one course, CIS 4980, System Development Projects. This course is the capstone course. Students in CIS 4980 are assigned to analyze, identify, and evaluate appropriate computer-based solutions for ‘real’ clients in local Atlanta-based organizations. In this course, the students work closely with ‘real’ information systems managers to help them identify work processes and workflows that might benefit from a proposed computer-based solution. Specifically, the student prepare a comprehensive proposal to implement a computer-based system in response to an existing, discovered problem (or opportunity) in the organization’s workflow. This comprehensive proposal is written (and presented orally), and includes formal sections that address points 1-5 in the definition of CTW for CIS BBA majors. The students are required to explicate, in great detail, how they would address points 1-5 in our definition of CTW. These points are manifestations of the learning outcomes for graduates of the BBA in CIS.


    Major: BIS
    Course Name: Metropolitan Atlanta
    Assignment:>
    1. Answers to Question of the Week. Each week a question based on the upcoming week’s class topic (usually related to the assigned reading) will be posted on our ULearn Bulletin board (it’s also shown on this syllabus). Using critical thinking skills, each student will write and post a response that draws on the week’s reading assignment to answer the question, typically providing a one or two paragraph response (200 – 250 words). Your answer to the question of the week must be posted no later than Tuesday midnight before the class on Wednesday. Each student is required to post answers to 10 questions of the week.

    2. Evaluation of “Metropolitan Frontiers” exhibit at the Atlanta History Center (130 West Paces Ferry Road, 404 814-4000). You write a 4-5 page paper in which you discuss and critique the content, design, and effectiveness of the “Metropolitan Frontiers” exhibit. You visit the exhibit the class night of January 25 and read the book, Atlanta: An Illustrated History, before writing your paper. Due: February 8. Since this is a CTW course, undergraduates will submit a draft of their paper and receive feedback on their writing and then they will turn in a final version of this written assignment.

    3. The Book Review is a five-page essay in which you give a synopsis and critical assessment of one of the books listed above (by Allen, Ferguson, Greene, Hunter, Kuhn, Pomerantz, Sjoquist, Oney, or Kruse). Other requirements and suggestions for your book review are included in this syllabus. Due: by April 12.


    Rational:
    Students will be asked to demonstrate critical thinking by evaluating arguments in their weekly response papers. Furthermore, they will be given the opportunity to rewritetheir "Metropolitan Frontiers" assignment, in which they will incorporate feedback by instructor(s).


    Major: Criminal Justice
    Course Name: Research Methods in Criminal Justice
    Assignment:>
    SAMPLE CRITICAL THINKING THROUGH WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

    The following are sample assignments that teaching faculty may use to meet the University’s CTW requirements. Faculty members retain discretion regarding which assignments best suit their individual courses; however, a substantial portion of the assignments and the resulting grades must be based on one or more critical thinking through writing assignments.


    Sample Homework Assignments

    Category I: Hypotheses formation


    Assignment 1: Exercises on Writing Hypotheses (Glenn Harper)

    1. Rewrite the following statements (see below) into a form which will make each a testable hypothesis.
    A. Our elderly population is not physically healthy.
    B. Juvenile delinquency is on the rise.
    C. Poverty breeds violence.
    D. Women are underpaid.
    E. Men make lousy parent.
    F. Catholics tend to be Democrats.
    G. Frequent smoking increases the chance of lung cancer.
    H. Bureaucracy stifles the creativity of law enforcement personnel.
    I. Correctional treatment programs reduce the chance of re-offending.
    J. Except for athletes, masculinity is inversely related to the occupational income of
    males.

    2. For each of your testable hypotheses identify, creating where necessary:
    a. The independent variable and the categories over which it varies
    b. The dependent variable and the categories over which it varies
    c. Where appropriate the control variable and its categories
    3. Identify the type of relationship expressed in your hypothesis.
    4. Sketch a graph which would illustrate data supporting the hypothesis.
    5. Identify the negative (deviant) cases for each hypothesis; each hypothesis has two sets of such cases.



    Assignment 2

    Directions: The purpose of this assignment is for you to develop two research problems that are of interest to you. The assignment is due XXXXXX, 200X at class time. Provide a detailed written response to each the following:

    1. Write two research questions and identify the independent variable and dependent variables contained in each.

    2. Next, locate one empirical or data-based study in the social science, criminology, or criminal justice journals that relates to each question. It is important that the variables identified in the research questions match (or be very similar to) those contained in the study itself. Answer all of the questions or statements below.

    a. For each research study, state the researcher’s hypothesis involving the variables in question; that is, what did the researcher expect to find? Was the hypothesis justified adequately in terms of the theoretical framework? In terms of prior research?

    b. Summarize briefly the findings as it pertains to the hypothesis in question. In other words, what did the researchers find?

    c. Discuss the extent to which the hypothesis is supported or not supported by the study’s findings.




    Category II: Literature Review


    Assignment 1:
    The Library: Locating and Using Selected Resources in the Social Sciences
    (Dr. J.A. Ruggiero): Evaluating scholarly literature in the area of your research interest

    An important part of doing any type of empirical research involves exploring and evaluating what is known in an area before you design a study. Your assignment is to learn more about your research topic and to summarize what you learn in an Introductory Statement which will accompany your research design.


    A. Procedure

    1. Select and critically evaluate at least 10 scholarly works pertinent to your research question. For each article discuss the following:

    a. Generally, what has been reported?
    b. What theories and variables have been considered relevant? Explain why.

    In the main, you will be reading articles rather than books. Limit the number of books you review to two at most. Select articles from “scholarly journals” rather than from “popular journals” (e.g., Time, Newsweek, etc.) or web blogs for this assignment. If you do find some interesting and relevant articles in such magazines, you may read them if you wish but do not include them in your bibliography. As your search for references, start with the most recent years and work backward. Your reading should adequately cover the period of about the last ten years. Use the library resources discussed in class.

    Some of you will be designing research studies on topics that have been popular in the literature whereas others of you will be exploring relatively new areas of research. Therefore, some of you will find many pertinent references and others may find relatively few. If you can not find approximately 10 relevant articles written between 1997and the present, search back farther in the literature to be sure that you haven’t missed anything worth examining. If you are still unable to find the sufficient articles on your research interest please discuss the matter with the instructor.

    2. Attach a bibliography of references to your introductory statement.
    Cite the complete reference for each work you read using the APA format as models. For a quick guide of citation format, please refer to the following web page created by Lyn Thaxton.
    http://www.library.gsu.edu/files/research/68/citation-styles.pdf
    List all bibliographic references in alphabetical order. If you read only part of the book, indicate the chapter or page numbers after the date of publication.

    NOTE: Do not simply copy abstracts out of the electronic journals/ database. Once you locate the references you plan to use, determine whether or not the articles are available in the library (hard copies) or on line (full text). If you have trouble locating any articles, you should ask the reference librarian to see if they can assist you. Keep in mind that library research and article locating takes time.

    3. Write up the results of your library research in an introductory statement of no more than 4-5 pages. Try to summarize, evaluate, and pull together ideas and research rather than report on each article you find in serial fashion (i.e., one after another).




    Assignment 2: Literature Review

    Directions: The purpose of this assignment is to write the introduction to your literature review. Write two to three pages that include the following components of your introduction. The introduction must be typed and double-spaced. Be sure to include bibliographic references on a separate page at the end of the introduction. The assignment is due XXXXX, 200X at class time.

    A. Provide a broad overview of the problem to be studied by discussing the general framework (e.g., historical, substantive, theoretical, methodological) into which the current problem fits and mentioning trends and areas in which the subject remains problematic. Discuss the need of the research and describe the expected benefits that may be derived as a result of the research. That is, provide a clear identification of the rationale of the study by addressing why this research and its findings may be useful to criminal justice and/or criminology. Identify experts or authorities in the field that have researched this problem and/or those who have called for further research in this area.

    B. After discussing the problem generally, shift the discussion to focus on the specific research problem or question under investigation. Identify the purpose (i.e., goal or direction) of the study by stating concisely the problem the research hopes to address or the question the research hopes to answer. In doing so, you must identify the limitations (i.e., weaknesses that potentially limit the validity of the results, including flaws in a study’s research design, sampling, method of data collection, operationalization of concepts, etc.) or delimitations (i.e., a boundary to which the study was deliberately confined, thus resulting in neglected or understudied aspects of the problem) of previous research. Next, state how your study intends to improve and/or build upon prior studies.


    Category III: Field Study


    Assignment 1:

    A. Select some setting in which you can observe at least three people interacting. There must be at least some difference in the statuses of the intereactants. You may be one of the participants. Possible settings are a classroom, a family discussion, or a bus ride.

    Select a setting to which you can return for your structured observation at the beginning of March. (For the follow up observation the interactants need not be exactly the same but you must use the same setting).

    B. Observe the interaction among the participants for thirty minutes to one hour. Take notes while you observe if possible, if not record your notes immediately after leaving the field.

    C. Using only the information obtained during the observation write a paper—maximum length 5 typed pages—including the following:

    1. describe the setting
    2. describe your access to the setting
    3. describe your role in the setting
    4. describe the relative status of each participant
    5. for each of the above be sure to indicate how you know each piece of information. What did you observe that told you what you know? You do not have to pretend to be a Martian (that is you can know what goes on in your culture) but you cannot use any prior knowledge of the people you are observing.




    Assignment 2

    Directions: The purpose of this assignment is to conduct an observational study of crime and deviance (e.g., observe prostitutes on a street corner or patrons at a bar or strip club), court proceedings (e.g., observe a juvenile court case), or the criminal processing of offenders (e.g., do a “ride-along” with the city police). Write a four to six page paper that describes your observations and evaluates your observation methods and strategies used. The paper must be typed and double-spaced. The assignment is due XXXXX, 200X at the beginning of class.

    1. Describe the type of observational method used and what strategies you used to record or remember the observations. Discuss any problems that you encountered with the observational method and strategies employed.

    2. What did you observe? Describe in detail the setting, people (including offenders, victims, and official agents of control as appropriate), and circumstances you observed.

    3. What are some problems that you encountered while making your observations that may pose as threats to the reliability and validity of your observations? What would you do differently in future observations to avoid or eliminate these problems?

    4. Observational data can be very useful in the development of research questions and hypotheses. Based upon the observations made, formulate two separate research questions and a hypothesis for each question.




    Assignment 3: (Non-participant Observations of Brief, Face-to-face interactions)

    Directions: Find a situation where brief, face-to-face interactions between two people take place very frequently—with one of the two people always being the same person; they should be brief so that you can observe 12 interactions in a fairly short period of time; clearly this should be a very public situation in which you can do your observations; e.g., information counters in Marta stations and bus terminals; counters in restaurants, bars, and taverns; busy news stands and convenient stores; waiting rooms, etc. Use your imagination in selecting a suitable locale. One important consideration in selecting a suitable locale is: can you take notes there without attracting attention? (e.g., without disturbing the situation by your presence).

    Reporting details: The field work report to be handed in should contain at least the following--in 3-4 pages:
    a. A sketch of the locale where you did your observations, indicating those features that are salient to the interactions that you are recording.
    b. A recording of your actual observations, making sure that you keep observations and conclusions separate.
    c. A brief summary, at the end, of what you have found out about the type of interaction represented by your small sample of 12 cases.




    Category IV: Research Proposal


    Research Proposal: The student will write a research proposal on a research problem in criminal justice or criminology. The student will submit one or more of the following components of the paper for review and feedback from the instructor prior to turning in the final project: an outline, elements of the proposal (abstract, introduction, literature review, etc.), or the completed paper in draft form.


    Guidelines for the Research Proposal Paper

    The basics:

    • The paper must be NO less than 10 pages and NO MORE than 12 pages long.
    • Page length includes the following
    o The title page
    o The “body” of the paper (i.e., the intro, methods, and budget)
    • Page length does NOT include the following
    o The abstract
    o The references
    o The appendices
    • You must use 12 point font. Only Times New Roman or Arial are permissible (TNR will allow you to squeeze more in and Arial will allow you to meet the minimum page requirements)
    • You must use 1-inch margins all the way around the paper
    • The paper must have a page header in the upper right hand corner. It must be a smaller version of the title (no more than three words long) with a page number to its right
    • You may include footnotes. They must be located at the bottom of the page where they are referenced (not at the end of the paper as an endnote). Footnotes must be in 10 point font
    • The title page must NOT have a header or page number on it

    Title Page



    Abstract: The abstract goes on the second page. It is one paragraph, no more than 100 words long and is a summary of what the reader is about to see in the body of the proposal. Provide brief descriptions of the intro and methods but NOT the budget.

    The Body: The body of the paper is composed of three main parts

    1) The introduction/literature review. Should be around 4- 7 pages. Provides the reader with the research background of your project. The lit review can be done in two ways
    o Temporal review: gives a history of the research that has preceded your proposal. Starts from earliest work and moves forward in time to the present.
    o Conceptual review: provides the reader with previous research that has been conducted on different variables in your proposal. For example, if you are testing two variables - say, the effect of education and poverty on juvenile prostitution – the review would cover each variable separately. There would be a brief review of research on education and juvenile prostitution, then a brief review of the research on poverty and juvenile prostitution. That would lead up to your proposal which proposes to study the combined effects of education and poverty on juvenile prostitution.
    • For the purposes of this paper I want you to use at LEAST six references (five of which must come from academic, refereed articles, and the sixth of which can come from an academic book). These sources must be original material (i.e., no magazine or newspaper articles, no web sites, and no textbooks).
    • Use APA style for all referencing and general style requirements. You can find copies of the APA guide in the library.

    2) Proposed Methods: This is where you describe what you will do with the money that you are asking for. Think of this section as if it were a “recipe” for conducting research. You must provide enough detail to the reader so that he/she knows what you are doing and how you will do it. You must include the “ingredients” (i.e., materials, forms, supplies, necessary personnel, etc.) as well as “instructions” (i.e., procedures) in this section. The following are GENRERALLY what should be included in the methods, but this is totally up to you depending on what kind of proposal you are doing.
    o Setting: If you are doing the research in a particular place and this place has an important role in the research then describe it here. For example if you are comparing an urban (i.e., Atlanta) city to a rural (i.e., Helen, GA) one in a proposed qualitative research project, you would provide crime statistics and demographic information for both places. You do not need a setting section if the setting is not crucial to the proposal (i.e., you don’t need one if all you are doing is a quantitative study of police suicide rates across the US).
    o Participants: This is where you describe the individuals you are studying. Provide age, gender, and other demographic and criminal justice related information here. You don’t need this section if people are not what you are studying (for example, a study of how different newspapers report crime).
    o Materials: This is where you describe any physical material you will need to use in your study. For example, a description of any psychological measures or surveys would go here (a description, but not the actual survey itself…that would go in the appendix). If you are going to use computers or other equipment, describe here.
    o Procedures: This is where you describe the process of research, from start to finish (the “how to do it” portion). Include a timeline here.
    o Budget justification: This is where you explain why you need to spend money on things (computers are needed to compile data, they cost this much. I will need a course release, it costs this much, etc.).

    3) Budget: The budget is a spread sheet that describes every proposed expenditure DOWN to the PENNY. It must be exact. If your study will take more than one year, you must provide separate budget lines for each year of the project.

    References: Use APA format or the format used in the journal, Criminology.

    Appendices: Any graphs, tables, or materials (questionnaires, surveys, etc.) go here.






    Rational:
    The rationale for each assignment is specified in the assignment as described in the syllabus.


    Major: Criminal Justice
    Course Name: Ethics in Criminal Justice
    Assignment:>
    ASSIGNMENT #2 – JUSTICE AND ETHICS
    POLICE and ACTUAL INNOCENCE
    For this assignment, you will be answering questions based on Actual Innocence and a news article as well as class. You must write a 3-5 page paper that answers the following questions. Your answers must be typed and you must secure your answer and supporting materials with a staple. Be sure to place your name on your document as well. Materials that are submitted that are not in accordance with these guidelines will not be accepted.
    1. What are the problems identified in Actual Innocence about the use of Snitches? Briefly describe the Williamson case and how snitches were used. Based on this chapter, do you think the use of Snitches is ethical? Why or why not?
    2. According to the book Actual Innocence and your own thoughts, why would someone falsely confess to a crime? Should confessions be given more primacy than other forms of evidence? Why or why not? Be sure to think about fraud by scientists discussed in Actual Innocence.
    3. Read the attached article regarding police officer behavior and answer the following questions:
    a. Is it ethical for the police, as undercover officers, to actually receive sexual services in attempts to arrest prostitutes? Why or why not? Use an ethical system to explain your answer.
    b. What are the implications for the community when officers do such activities?
    c. In the article, it is argued that the police were using the “same lawful investigative techniques” as undercover officers who purchase illegal drugs. Do you agree with this statement? Why or why not?

    ASSIGNMENT #1 – JUSTICE AND ETHICS
    ETHICAL ISSUES IN DAILY LIFE
    For this assignment, you will be answering questions about an ethical dilemma that you have faced in your life and how others approach dilemmas in their life. You must write a 3-5 page paper that addresses the following questions. Your answers must be typed. Be sure to place your name on your document. Materials that are submitted that are not in accordance with these guidelines will not be accepted. Due by beginning of class on Sept. 2.
    1. Think of an ethical dilemma that you have faced in your life. This dilemma can have to do with a personal or professional issue that you have had to address. Think about some time in your life when you have had to consider what the right thing to do would be. Answer the following questions about the dilemma you choose.
    2. Write a brief description of the ethical dilemma you have faced.
    3. What options did you have to resolve the dilemma?
    4. What did you decide to do to resolve the dilemma? In other words, what did
    you do?
    5. Why did you make the choice that you did? Also, what ethical system could
    you apply that would support your choice? How does this ethical system
    apply to your particular choice?
    6. Looking back, do you think that you made the correct, ethical decision? What ethical system most closely reflects how you generally make decisions in your life? Why?
    7. Ask one person – someone who is not a Criminal Justice Major or in this class – about an ethical dilemma he/she have faced in their life. Provide a description of the person you asked (e.g. teacher, mother, student) and a brief description of his/her dilemma and what he/she decided to do to resolve the dilemma. Based on what he/she tells you, what ethical system could apply to their decision? How does this ethical system apply to the decision? Do you think his/her decision was the most ethical one? Why or why not?

    There is a 3rd assignment developed at this date, but I am unable to cut-and-paste it in.

    Rational:
    These assignments require students to recognize/identify ethical issues in the field, apply theoretical explanations to ethical dilemnas, distinquish between personal positions and the frameworks of others - as well as recognized ethical frameworks in the field, and demonstrate the ability to sythezie information, among other skills. Students are required to accomplish these tasks and demonstrate their ability to do so using written communication.


    Major: Criminal Justice
    Course Name: Seminar in Criminal Justice
    Assignment:>
    CTW Assignment Overview: Each student will write an Analysis of Criminological/Criminal Justice Issue Essay that is valued at 60% of the student's grade. This essay, which is designed to test the student's ability to critically evaluate or assess an issue in criminology and/or criminal justice, consists of three major components--identification of a criminal justice issue that is directly related to the placement experience, a review of relevant theoretical literature, and a discussion of current policy implications. Students will submit a detailed outline of paper, an initial draft, and a final draft. Each student will receive individualized feedback from the instructor and/or CTW Consultatnt on the outline and first draft. Each essay must contain academic references in text and in the reference section. All references MUST conform to APA citation and style requirements. While the length of each essay will vary, it is assumed that most will be approximately 6-9 pages in length. All papers must be APA requirements.

    Analysis of Criminological/Criminal Justice Issue Essay: This essay is designed to test your ability to critically evaluate or assess an issue in criminology and/or criminal justice. For this assignment, you must first identify a single issue from your internship experience that involves crime or the criminal justice system and discuss why you find it interesting or significant. A central feature of this component of the assignment is the care taken to define and clarify not only the issue but also the reasoning behind labeling the issue interesting or significant.
    The second component of this assignment tests your understanding of theory in the criminal justice/criminology context. You are to select a theory that has had an impact on our understanding of the issue you previously identified as being of interest to you (such as a criminological, sociological, psychological, organizational, or legal theory). Then drawing upon original sources from the literature (not textbooks) explain the theory, state its significance by indicating how it has impacted knowledge of this issue, identify criticisms directed at the theory, and assess the theory’s practical influence on crime and/or justice policy in this area.
    The third component of this essay is designed to test the breadth and depth of your understanding of the issue you have identified and its impact the justice system. You are asked to construct a debate by identifying the strengths and weaknesses on both sides of the issue. Your analysis and evaluation must be informed and supported by the criminal justice literature in this area.

    Effective Fall semester 2009 GSU will require that every student take and successfully pass two CTW courses in the Major prior to graduating. The Seminar in Criminal Justice has been designated as a CTW course. The Analysis of Criminological/Criminal Justice Issue Essay has been developed to meet the CTW requirement. While teaching faculty will retain discretion regarding how the assignment is administered (e.g., whether to require students to prepare an outline, submit elements of the paper for review and feedback [abstract, introduction, literature review, etc.], or submit the completed paper in draft form for review and feedback) all faculty must provide students feedback and an opportunity for revision. The Department has developed and will maintain a standard rubric to be used by faculty to assess student performance.



    Rational:
    The Analysis of Criminological/Criminal Justice Issue Essay is designed to test the student's ability to critically evaluate or assess an issue in criminology and/or criminal justice. The issue chosen is selected by the student based on his/her internship experience. The assignment also requires students to conduct criminological research, which allows them to understanding the theoretical underpinnings of their issues and determine how they relate to other issues in the field.


    Major: Computer Science
    Course Name: DATA STRUCTURES
    Assignment:>
    [These three examples are based on current assignments, since we plan to adapt this course.]

    Programming Assignment #2

    Description of Program

    You are to write a program name phonedir that maintains a list of records containing names and phone numbers. The program will prompt the user for a command, execute the command, then prompt the user for another command. The commands must be chosen from the following possibilities:

    a Show all records
    d Delete the current record
    f Change the first name in the current record
    l Change the last name in the current record
    n Add a new record
    p Change the phone number in the current record
    q Quit
    s Select a record from the record list to become the current record


    The following example illustrates the behavior of each command
    ...

    MENU DISPLAYED AGAIN

    Enter a command from the list above (q to quit): z

    Illegal command

    Enter a command from the list above (q to quit): q


    Here are some other additional requirements for this program:

    * Your comments must include design choices, as well as justifications.
    * You may assume that phone number contains no spaces.
    * After a deletion, there is no record currently selected
    * Each record (first name, last name and phone number) must be stored as an object. These object must be stored as a list.
    * The list must be kept sorted at all times based on last name. Note: Changing the last name will require resorting.
    * Use as many generic algorithms as you can.

    What to turn in

    Turn in a disk containing phonedir.cpp, phonedir.exe and any other source files and header files in your program. Also turn in listings (hard copies) of all source and header files. The listing should show your program working for several different input cases. The grader will also test the functionality of your program, using different input.


    ***

    Programming Assignment 3

    You are to write a program name calc that evaluates an infix expression entered by the user. The expression may contain the following tokens:
    (1) Integer constants (a series of decimal digits).
    (2) x (representing a value to be supplied later).
    (3) Unary operators (+ and -).
    (4) Binary operators (+, -, *, / and %).
    (5) Parentheses

    Spaces between tokens are allowed but not required. The program will convert the expression to postfix (RPN) form and display the converted expression.
    In the postfix version of the expression, unary + will be removed, and
    the unary operator will be replaced by the _ (underscore) character. The program will repeatedly prompt the user for the value of x, displaying the value of the expression each time. When the user enters the letter q instead of a number, the program terminates.

    The following example illustrates the behavior of the program (user input is in bold and red):
    Porgram output is in bold and green.

    Enter infix expression: (x + 1) * (x - 2) / -4
    Converted expression: x 1 + x 2 - * 4 _ /

    Enter value of x: 5
    Answer to expression: -4

    Enter value of x: 7
    Answer to expression: -10

    Enter value of x: q

    If the infix expression contains an error of any kind, the program must display the message Error in expression (with an optional explanation) and then terminate. The following examples illustrate various types of errors:

    Enter infix expression: 1 2 +
    Error in expression!! No operator between operands. Also last token must be an operand.

    Enter infix expression: 10.4
    Error in expression!! Cannot accept floating point numbers.

    Here are some other additional requirements for this program:

    (1) You must use stack objects during the translation from infix to postfix and during the evaluation of the postfix expression.

    (2) Operators must have the correct precedence and associativity. Unary operators take precedence over * and /, which in turn take precedence over binary + and -. Unary operators are right associative; binary operators are left associative.


    What to turn in

    Turn in a disk containing calc.cpp, calc.exe, postfix.h and postfix.cpp.
    Also turn in listings (hard copies) of all source and header files. The listing should show your program working for several different input cases. The grader will also test the functionality of your program, using different input.

    Hints:

    1. Do the program in stages. First, get the infix to postfix conversion working for binary operators. Next, implement the evaluation of the postfix expression. Then add the unary operators. Finally, add code to check the infix expression for errors. Use the examples form the hand out as a starting point for the program, but keep in mind that this code does not allow unary operators, nor does it handle associativity properly.

    2. To tell the difference between unary and binary operators, use a
    Boolean variable that keeps track of whether the previous token was an operand or an operator. If the program encounters a + or token when the previous token was an operator, then the + or is a unary operator. (Note: Watch out for the beginning of the expression.)

    3. To detect errors in the infix expression, you will need to check for several situations:

    A binary operator is preceded by an operator or an operand is preceded by an
    operand.
    An illegal character is encountered (such as a period).
    The last token in the expression is not an operand.
    There is no left parentheses anywhere in the stack when a right parentheses is
    encountered.
    The stack contains a left parenthesis when the expression ends.

    ***

    Programming Assignment 4

    [Note to CTW committee: This assignment is an advanced version of the
    previous example, and allows the students to re-use some of their
    previous solution and correct mistakes.]

    You are to write a program name expressionTree.cpp that evaluates an infix expression entered by the user. The expression may contain the following tokens:
    (1) Integer constants (a series of decimal digits).
    (2) Alphabetic characters (representing a value to be supplied later).
    (3) Binary operators (+, -, * and /).
    (4) Parentheses
    (5) Unary operators (+ and -)

    You will parse the input expression creating an expression tree with the tokens, the use the postOrder tree traversal algorithm to extract a postfix expression from the tree. Display this postfix expression(String).You will supply this postfix expression (string) to the calculator engine to produce a result.

    Spaces between tokens are allowed but not required. In the parse tree as well
    as the postfix version of the expression, unary + will be removed, and
    the unary - operator will be replaced by the _ (underscore) character. The program will repeatedly prompt the user for the value of x, displaying the value of the expression each time. When the user enters the letter q instead of a number, the program terminates.

    The following example illustrates the behavior of the program (user input is in bold):

    Enter infix expression: (x + 1) * (x - 2) / -4
    Converted expression: x 1 + x 2 - * 4 _ /

    Enter value of x: 5
    Answer to expression: -4

    Enter value of x: 7
    Answer to expression: -10

    Enter value of x: q

    If the infix expression contains an error of any kind, the program must display the message Error in expression (with an optional explanation) and then terminate. The following examples illustrate various types of errors:

    Enter infix expression: 1 2 +
    Error in expression!! No operator between operands. Also last token must be an operand.

    Enter infix expression: 10.4
    Error in expression!! Cannot accept floating point numbers.

    Enter infix expression: 1 ( + 2)
    Error in expression!! No operator between operand and left parentheses.

    Enter infix expression: 5 - (x - 2))
    Error in expression!! No matching left parentheses for a right parentheses.

    Enter infix expression: 1 ** 2
    Error in expression!! The * operator cannot be preceded by a * operator.

    The output of your program must match the format illustrated in this example.

    Here are some other additional requirements for this program:


    (1) You must use stack objects and list during the translation from infix to the parse tree and during the evaluation of the postfix expression.

    (2) Operators must have the correct precedence and associativity. Unary operators take precedence over * and /, which in turn take precedence over binary + and -. Unary operators are right associative; binary operators are left associative.

    What to turn in:


    Turn in a disk containing expressionTree.cpp, expressionTree.exe, parse.h and parse.cpp. Also turn in listings (hard copies) of all source and header files. Please mark your name prominently on the disk and listings. You must put comments at the beginning of the program giving the program name, your name, the course number (CSC 3410) and the date.

    Hints:


    1. Do the program in stages. First, get the infix to parse tree conversion working for binary operators. Next, implement the post order algorithm to produce the postfix expression then evaluate of the postfix expression. Then add the unary operators. Finally, add code to check the infix expression for errors. Use the examples from the hand out as a starting point for the program, but keep in mind that this code does not allow unary operators, nor does it handle associativity properly.

    2. To tell the difference between unary and binary operators, use a Boolean variable that keeps track of whether the previous token was an operand or an operator. If the program encounters a + or token when the previous token was an operator, then the + or is a unary operator. (Note: Watch out for the beginning of the expression.)

    3. To detect errors in the infix expression, you will need to check for several situations:

    A binary operator is preceded by an operator or an operand is preceded by an
    operand.
    An illegal character is encountered (such as a period).
    The last token in the expression is not an operand.
    There is no left parentheses anywhere in the stack when a right parentheses is
    encountered.
    The stack contains a left parenthesis when the expression ends.

    4. Use a string to store the postfix expression. Use a stack of operators and a stack of a
    list of nodes during the translation from infix to the parse tree.

    5. Use the isdigit function (from ) to test whether a character is a digit. Use the atoi function (from ) to convert a string to an integer.



    Rational:
    The assignments build on each other, becoming more complex and advanced over time. The students are able to re-use some of their previous solutions, after those have been graded, and adapt them to the new assignment. The students must justify their solutions through in-code comments, and demonstrate correctness through several test cases. The grader will likewise test the students' solutions.


    Major: Computer Science
    Course Name: Software Engineering
    Assignment:>
    Project Report #1: Team Description & Project Organization

    o Due: Sept 4

    o Turn in printed copy at the beginning of the class

    o This report should include:

    o Team Description: Team name, team members’ resumes, team coordinator selected

    o Signed Copy of the Contract

    o Project Description: a few paragraphs (half page) describing the project

    o Programming Language of Choice (Java or C++)

    o A project organization chart (may be in a hierarchical way). Sample.

    o A task-role table -- an example on page 91.

    o A Gantt chart -- an example on page 91.

    o A PERT chart -- an example on page 92



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Class Project Report #2: Requirement Elicitation Report

    *

    Due: Sept 18
    *

    Turn in printed copy at the beginning of the class
    *

    RAD document template on page 152 (page 126 in prev. edition) in the textbook.
    *

    Sections 1 through 3.4.2 need to be completed.
    *

    Part of section 3.4.5 -- a mock-ups user interface (only for the main interface) is also needed for this report.
    *

    For section 3.2 functional requirements, write in the format of "shall" statement and "will" statement (An example is shown on the handouts).
    *

    Add a "Rationale" section describing (informally) the rationale for Requirement Elicitation. This section will serve as the basis and become part of your Class Project Report 6: System Design Rationale Document (SDRD)
    *

    Have at least 10 use-cases identified.
    *

    Sample RAD 1 (ignore the class diagrams, sequence diagrams, etc.)
    *

    Sample RAD 2 (ignore the class diagrams, sequence diagrams, etc.)



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Class Project Report 3: Requirement Analysis Document (RAD)

    *

    Due: Oct 2
    *

    Turn in printed copy at the beginning of the class
    *

    RAD document template on page 200 (page 158 in prev. edition) in the textbook.
    *

    Sections 3.4.3-3.4.5 are to be added (section 3.4.5 be extended), other sections need to be revised, revision history needs to be added.
    *

    At least 5 sequence diagrams (e.g., corresponding to 5 of the identified use cases) and at least 2 state diagrams (e.g., for the system/subsystems, or for specific objects) are needed.
    *

    Add a section describing (informally) the rationale for Requirement Analysis.
    *

    See sample documents from the last assignment (RAD 1 and 2).
    *

    For a sample section 3.5.5 in RAD (User interface - navigational paths and screen mock-ups) see this sample RAD document: Bonus Subsystem in JAMES.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Class Project Report 4: System Design Document (SDD)

    *

    Due: Oct 18
    *

    Turn in printed copy at the beginning of the class
    *

    SDD Template is in book (page 283 in new edition and page 222 in old edition).
    *

    Add a section describing (informally) the rationale for system design.
    *

    Sample SDD1
    *

    Sample SDD2


    Rational:
    SAME except that this class also requires student presentations.


    Major: Early Childhood Education
    Course Name: Reading and Language Arts in Early Childhood Education
    Assignment:>
    Online Discussion Prompt SAMPLE:
    As you conduct running records within an Informal Reading Inventory (I.R.I.) with your first grade students, you notice one child who continually replaces words (i.e., like) with another similar meaning word (i.e., love). What could this mean? How would you address this switch in the word? Is this a comprehension problem? A fluency problem perhaps? What strategies could you teach her that might alleviate this “word swap”?

    Quickwrite Prompt SAMPLE:
    [Four authentic informal assessments are provided.]Take a few minutes to look at the initial assessments conducted by a fifth grade teacher on her student, Gloria. As you look at the initial assessments pretend you are Gloria’s teacher. Think about how the “get-to-know-you” assessments will inform your work with Gloria, as a person and learner. What do you know about Gloria’s reading? What will you do to teach Gloria to read better? What are you still wondering?


    Rational:
    The online discussion provides a forum for students to display critical thinking through writing; however, through the use of teacher- and peer-questioning students are encouraged to hone their thinking and writing.

    The quickwrites are given several times (5-10) in a semester. They are graded and returned to students with questions and comments. Students can revise and resubmit their quickwrites within an agreed upon time period for regrading.


    Major: Economics
    Course Name: MACROECONOMICS
    Assignment:>
    The CTW component of this course is embedded in the problem sets, designed to have the student think critically in his/her major and receive feedback. The two homework assignments, worth 10% each, will be given back after the first draft to allow the student to improve on it. Thus, two drafts of each problem set in total will be handed in. The problem sets will involve interpreting articles in the media and applying current events to concepts learned in class.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Economics
    Course Name: SENIOR CAPSTONE IN ECONOMIC POLICY
    Assignment:>
    The individual book review will require the student to explore topics in economics that he or she is interested in and choose a book to read and thoroughly review. The review should be done in 5-6 pages (using one-inch margins, double-spaced, Times New Roman 12 font). The review should incorporate 2-3 economic concepts and provide a detailed, thoughtful analysis of the book, not simply a summary. A sample book review will be provided with instructions on the format. The instructor must approve of the book first (in Week 4). An outline for the book review will be due in Week 5. Three versions of the book review will be handed in by the end of the semester. The first draft is due Week 7; the second is due Week 11; and the final version is due on the last day of class (Week 15). The student will be required to address any concerns the instructor has in subsequent versions of your book review in order to improve the book review grade. Concerns will be based on the bullet points outlined in the sample book review outline that will be made available on uLearn. In particular, the student will be graded on the following components of the book review: the introduction, explanation of the book, application of at least two economic concepts to the book explanation in the body of the text, structure of review, valid opinion and conclusion, and references (graded also through citing sources accurately and not plagiarizing).

    Quizzes and class participation will also involve thinking critically. Some quizzes will involve grading other students' work and explaining why or why not they agree or disagree with colleague’s grade upon having the quiz returned. The quizzes will often require the students to critically evaluate classical economic assumptions and provide real-world examples of how and why these assumptions may not be valid.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Middle Childhood Education
    Course Name: Critical Issues in Middle Grades Education
    Assignment:>
    Classroom Management Plan:

    Students will develop a conceptual classroom management plan that includes a theoretical/conceptual premise (cite sources/authors/theories from course texts) and details of how they will implement classroom procedures in their own classrooms. The plan should be a synthesis of students' readings and field experiences that result in a cohesive and comprehensive professional classroom management philosophy that will be designed in such a format as to carry over the student's first year of teaching. This conceptual plan should explain the student's choice/rationale in the development of his/her approach to classroom management.

    Reflection and Professional Goal Setting:

    Students will reflect on artifacts collected in portfolio throughout the semester in light of the objectives for this course as well as the requirements for the exit requirement. Artifacts should be added to the portfolio throughout the semester to demonstrate growth and accomplishments. Based on their analysis of the artifacts, the students will (1) set professional goals in areas they feel they need the greatest growth, and (2) construct a plan to enable them to reach those goals. These professional goals are to be articulated in a paper (3-6 pages). The professional goal setting should include goals for not only the student teacher semester, but extend to the first year of teaching.

    Rational:
    As a CTW course, students will be heavily engaged in the writing process, which will require critical analyses of the texts and materials that will be used throughout this course. Students' writings are expected to express clear, yet concrete ideas about the various aspects of teaching in the middle grades.


    Major: Middle Childhood Education
    Course Name: Reading and Writing in the Content Areas
    Assignment:>
    1. Professional Book Group Discussion and Paper

    In a group of 3 or 4, students will read one of the professional books outlined in the syllabus. The class will meet three times across the semester to discuss the ideas presented by the authors. As a group, students will write a reflection of the book and a discussion, and will need to audio record their book discussions in order to include quotes in their paper, which highlights their discussion of ideas. Students will attach their digital voice recordings of their discussions and their final paper in the appropriate LiveText folder.

    2. Literacy teacher/specialist/coach interview and written reflection.

    Students will interview a teacher who teaches at least one reading class to struggling readers, or a reading specialist or literacy coach who will work with struggling readers in the school where students are completing their practicum. Students will develop guiding questions as a class. Students will also audio record their interviews (and include it on LiveText) and write a synthesis of what they learned from their interview. Students will also include connections to the texts in your written synthesis and reflection paper.

    3. Literacy Observation and Analysis

    Students will use a Literacy Observation Chart, which will be developed in class, to help them focus their observations of the students in the class in which they will be teaching their practicum. Students will develop a class profile of the students with a written analysis, which includes connections to the texts.

    4. Text Set Development
    You will design a text set, which addresses a topic of study in the content classroom in which you are teaching in your practicum. Your text set must include at least one adolescent novel, three picture books, two web-based resources, the textbook used in the classroom, the newspaper and/or news magazine, and content focused adolescent magazine articles (such as Faces, Scholastic Action, etc – not teen fashion or sports focused magazines).Your chosen texts must include a range of reading levels as well as narrative and expository texts. You will read each of the texts you choose and write a summary of each of them along with details about why you chose that particular text and how the information connects to the chosen topic.




    Rational:
    As a CTW course, students will be heavily engaged in the writing process,which will require critical analyses of the texts and materials that will be used throughout this course. Students' writings are expected to express clear, yet concrete ideas about the various apects of teaching in the middle grades.


    Major: English
    Course Name: Introduction to Literary Studies
    Assignment:>
    Close Reading Exercise (CTW) – 10%

    You will be working on 3 CTW projects this semester. These written exercises are not meant to be formal papers and will not be graded as such. Each will be assessed using the Department of English’s critical thinking rubric. Your final project will be a formal paper based on the ideas and skills you are developing in these CTW assignments.

    Objectives:

    • Understand the concept of close reading
    • Analyze a literary text
    • Interpret a literary text
    • Develop a clear argument
    • Organize a clear argument

    The Assignment:

    • Choose 1 of the poems we discussed on September 6th (the poems are listed on the syllabus)
    • Follow the steps on the close reading instructions we went over in class (on the other side of this handout)
    • Come to some conclusion about the meaning of the poem
    • Write a 2 to 3 page argument about the meaning of the poem based on your close reading

    Assessment:

    I will use the critical thinking rubric developed by the Department of English to assess this project. We will be discussing this rubric throughout the semester. For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills:

    • Analyze- Your close reading should examine the component parts of a text to better understand the work as a whole.
    • Interpret- Your close reading should lead to thoughtful conclusions about the meaning of your chosen text.
    • Development- Although this assignment will not be graded as a formal paper, you will need to provide appropriate examples and explanations to support your argument.
    • Organization- Although this assignment will not be graded as a formal paper, you will need to organize your ideas in a way that best supports your argument.



    -------------------------------

    Theory Exercise (CTW) – 10%

    Objectives:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of a literary theory
    • Apply a literary theory to a text
    • Interpret a literary text
    • Develop a clear argument
    • Organize a clear argument

    The Assignment:

    This exercise will be an informal 3 to 5 page theory paper on any of the stories or poems from this semester.

    We have discussed many of the major theoretical approaches to literary study this semester and have used some of these theories to explore a number of short literary works. For this assignment you will apply at least one of these theories to one of the literary works we have read. You must use one of the theoretical approaches besides New Criticism.

    Be sure that you offer a clear thesis that suggests your theoretical approach and what this brings to an understanding of the text you are addressing. Then defend your thesis with examples. Use plenty of direct quotations of words, phrases, and lines. Look at the methodologies and student papers in your textbook for guidelines. Each school of theory approaches a text in a different way, so there is not one specific methodology for all of your papers. Avoid using any outside criticism at this point. You will have a chance to do this in the final paper.

    Assessment:

    I will use the critical thinking rubric developed by the Department of English to assess this project. We will be discussing this rubric throughout the semester. For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills:

    • Apply- Clearly show how the theory you are using is useful in exploring the text you have chosen for this project.
    • Interpret- Your application of a literary theory should lead to thoughtful conclusions about the meaning of your chosen text.
    • Development- Although this assignment will not be graded as a formal paper, you will need to provide appropriate examples and explanations to support your argument.
    • Organization- Although this assignment will not be graded as a formal paper, you will need to organize your ideas in a way that best supports your argument.

    ---------------------------------------


    Annotated Bibliography (CTW) – 10%

    Objectives:
    • Find appropriate sources
    • Use MLA citation
    • Distinguish between types of articles
    • Summarize articles
    • Evaluate articles
    • Apply research to course texts

    The first step will be choosing a work we are addressing in class and finding 5 sources that would be helpful in writing a research paper about your chosen work. You should not simply use the first 5 sources you come across. In class we will discuss the importance of finding appropriate sources. (For help, read the 4 parts in the Research Overview section of Purdue’s site: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/552/01/#resourcenav) After deciding upon 5 sources, you will create an annotated bibliography.

    Questions:
    As you read possible sources ask the following questions:
    • What are the 3 most important points made in the article?
    • What type of source is this? And why is this important to know?
    • Choose 2 quotations. Why are they important?
    • What questions do you have about the article?
    • Do you agree with the article?
    • How does the article affect your understanding of your chosen work?

    The Assignment:
    For each article, you will turn in a 1-page response that includes:
    • Citation (Use MLA format. Be sure to consider the particular type of source you are using. For help, use the various pages found on Purdue’s site: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/07/ )
    • Summary and Evaluation (You should use some of the earlier questions as a guide)
    • Application (Explain how the article affects your understanding of your chosen work)


    Assessment:

    I will use the critical thinking rubric developed by the Department of English to assess this project. We will be discussing this rubric throughout the semester. For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills:

    • Summary- I will not be familiar with the sources you are using. After reading your summary, I should have a basic understanding of the source. It must also be clear to me that you understand the source.
    • Evaluation- You must weigh the validity of the source you are using. Many types of sources can be useful, but you must explain the type of source and how it is appropriate to how you would use it in a research paper.
    • Apply- Clearly explain why each source is useful in addressing the text or film you have chosen for this project. If you don’t have much to say here, then you probably shouldn’t use the source.
    • Citation- Though citation is not a part of the critical thinking rubric, the citation for each entry will be a factor in determining your grade.




    Rational:
    The department of English has developed a rubric with ten critical thinking categories important to the study of English. The three sample assignments for ENGL 3040 are meant to develop some of the general skills that are essential to English majors—close reading, literary theory, and research. Each assignment will be assessed using several of the critical thinking categories in the rubric. For example, the theory assignment is meant to allow students to practice using the literary theories they are learning about in the course to better understand literary texts. The critical thinking skills involved in this exercise are Apply, Interpret, Develop, and Organize. The CTW assignments will not be treated as formal papers; they will be assessed using the rubric categories. Class discussion about the critical thinking rubric will be an important part of the CTW assignments. The final paper, which will not be a CTW assignment, will be a formal paper that asks students to use the skills and ideas they are developing in the CTW assignments.


    Major: English
    Course Name: Introduction to Rhetoric and Advanced Composition
    Assignment:>
    Annotated Bibliography and Response Paper
    Assessment: 20% of final course grade; CTW Requirement
    Purpose and Invention: The purpose of this assignment is for you to research an issue in rhetoric and composition; practice MLA format; summarize and evaluate articles; apply the articles to your experience; share this information with your peers. Your assignment has three parts:
    1. an annotated bibliography
    2. a one-page handout for your classmates (definition of issue; 1-2 paragraphs summarizing articles’ main points; 1-2 sentence-annotated bibliography).
    3. a synthesis and response paper

    Evidence: The evidence in your paper is what’s been written about your topic in scholarly journals and books (see the list of journals below). Consult the ERIC and MLA databases in Galileo, Herrick’s bibliography, the sources on my Helpful Resources page, and CompPile (http://compile.tamucc.edu) for sources. Use our library’s J-Stor to search the following journals in rhetoric and composition. Have all your sources approved by me before you proceed.

    Arrangement:
    Your annotated bibliography will include the MLA citation, a rhetorical précis, and a paragraph with a couple of important points and quotations. Follow MLA (Gibaldi) and my handouts for the annotated bibliography.

    For your response essay, evaluate the articles and apply their insights to your own writing experience. Consider: do you agree/disagree with the article and why? Have you been taught using these methods? Were they effective? Does the article remind you of current issues? What are your questions about the article?

    For your handout, write a definition of the issue, summarize the main points of your articles, and include a brief annotated bibliography (1-2 sentences—what the source includes).

    Style: Use clear, Standard English and academic style for the bibliography, paper, and handout. Your goal is to explain, teach, and inform us about the issue. Follow MLA format for style and citations.

    Delivery: Your bibliography, paper, and handout are due on Oct. 25. Turn in one copy of the bibliography, paper, and handout to me; make enough copies of the handout for the class. You will also turn in a copy of this project online for the CTW requirement.

    CTW Assessment: Comprehension (summarize, evaluate, analyze), Synthesis (compare/contrast and apply), and Argumentation (development and organization).



    Daily Questions and Papers (30% of final average and CTW requirements)

    These assignments are designed to help you master the course material, apply what you’re learning to your experience, and practice rhetorical strategies through various short writing activities. They will also help you become more aware of “rhetorical moments” you observe or experience in practice and help you apply the concepts you’re learning to your writing.

    Procedures:
    1. All assignments except in-class work must be typed. Follow MLA format for headings (name, class, date, assignment title).
    2. Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the day due.
    3. Late work must be turned in within one class day for a letter grade penalty—for any reason you’re absent. The letter grade deduction applies if you turn in the paper after class or miss class and submit it to my box or email, etc. In rare circumstances, I may, at my discretion, accept work EARLY if you make arrangements with me.
    4. Some of these will be assigned as CTW assignments, so you’ll turn these in online.

    Examples of Assignments:
    1. Discuss a rhetorical strategy or theory you see applied (in texts, web pages, other courses, television, personal experience, etc.)
    2. Create your online portfolio and print out a record; describe the process and your identity/philosophy as a writer (one entry).
    3. Two newspaper editorials with one-page rhetorical analysis (one using classical rhetorical theories; one using contemporary theories)
    4. Description of past experience with writing instruction and application to current topic.
    5. Chapter questions (number and answer in complete sentences). (summary).
    6. One rhetorical document from civic or workplace situation with a one-page audience/rhetorical situation analysis (analysis, compare and contrast, contextualization, development)
    7. Reaction or extension of class discussion, question, or topic (application)
    8. Research journal articles; evaluate sources; summarize material
    9. Group activities and skits
    10. Lead discussion of chapter from Murphy book. You’ll turn in a summary of the chapter and a set of discussion questions. My chapter is ___________________. (summary, organization)

    CTW Assessment: See particular assignments above for particular goals, but these assignments are designed to encourage: Comprehension (interpret, evaluate, summarize), Synthesis (contextualize, compare/contrast, apply), and Argumentation (organize).


    Rational:
    See description of assignments


    Major: English
    Course Name: Senior Seminar: Literary Studies
    Assignment:>
    1. Article summary, 1 page (10%).
    Pick one recent essay on regionalism. Aim to distill the thesis of the essay, to summarize its argument accurately, and to evaluate its use of evidence in developing its argument. Cite your source correctly using MLA format. You will submit this assignment online.

    Assessment:
    I will use the critical thinking rubric developed by the Department of English to assess this project. We will be discussing this rubric throughout the semester. For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills: analysis, summary, and evaluation.


    2. Peer review of Research Proposal , 3 paragraphs (10%).
    Write a thoughtful response to your partner’s Research Proposal that evaluates its argument, organization, and rhetoric and provides constructive suggestions for revision. You will give your response to your partner and submit the assignment online to be graded as a CTW assignment.

    For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills: Evaluation, Application, Development.


    3. Response to Peer Review, 1 paragraph (5%).
    Now that you have another student’s critical review of your proposed project, revise your plan. Explain in one or two well-written paragraph(s) how you will incorporate some suggestions and defend your decision not to incorporate others. You will submit this CTW assignment online.

    For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills: Contextualization; Comparison and Contrast; Rhetoric.


    4. Abstract of research paper, 1 paragraph (5%).
    Include with your final research paper a one-paragraph abstract that summarizes its argument. This abstract should be accurate and concise; it should also represent your best thinking and writing. You will also submit a copy of the abstract online to be graded as a CTW assignment.

    For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills: Interpretion; Contextualization; Rhetoric.


    Rational:
    See description of assignments


    Major: English
    Course Name: Senior Seminar: Workshop in Poetry
    Assignment:>
    This is a CTW course. Your responses and your self-evaluation paper will be assessed as CTW exercises using the Department of English’s critical thinking rubric. You will turn in all CTW assignments online (http://www.was.gsu.edu/wow)

    Responses (CTW): For the scheduled reading assignments, you will need to submit online a 3-5 page response to the book you have read for class. You need to submit them by midnight of the night before we discuss the reading (please see schedule). In these I will be evaluating you based on how well you comprehend and analyze the book you have been asked to read. I want you to pay particular attention to craft of the book: how the book is organized and how that organization effects the overall message and meaning of the collection; how the writer uses sound, imagery, figurative language and so on; how the writer uses form and what the effect of form has on the overall text; and finally, how one or two poems are constructed and how they speak to the book as a whole. To demonstrate your thinking you need to be analytical (identifying the overall pattern or patterns of the book thematically, formally and structurally and examining the meaning or meanings that emerge from the book). You should back up what you write about the book using examples and including quotes from the poetry. You should make some general comments about the book overall: structurally, formally and thematically, and then focus your response around two or three poems to which you were particularly drawn, using these specific poems to speak to what you have talked about as some of the larger thematic and formal concerns of the author.

    Reflection Essay (CTW): This is a 2-4 page essay that will be considered a part of your final portfolio and will emerge from the work you do completing the portfolio. In this essay, I would like you to reflect on and assess the process of composition and revision that you have completed based on the feedback you have received from me and from your peers during the course of the workshop. Here are some questions you will want to answer in the course of these essays: How has my work changed based on the feedback I’ve received? What feedback was most helpful and why? How have I grown as a writer and how is that growth reflected in the revisions I’ve completed for this course? How satisfied am I with the final portfolio and what would I hope to change in these poems or in my work overall as I continue to write and evolve as a writer?


    Rational:
    See description of assignments


    Major: English
    Course Name: Senior Seminar: Workshop in Fiction
    Assignment:>
    "Reading as a Writer" Responses (CTW)
    These written exercises are not meant to be formal papers and will not be graded as such. Each will be assessed according to the Department of English's critical thinking rubric.

    Objectives:
    *Understand the concept of "reading as a writer," i.e. reading with an eye toward the craft of writing
    *Analyze a literary texxt "as a writer"
    *Develop a clear argument
    *Organize a clear argument

    For each story we discuss, choose at least two and no more than four aspects of narrative craft you feel the writer uses most of least successfully; identify examples of these techniques taht you can offer to support your claims. Develop, organize, and execute a clear argument for the story's merit as a model for your own writing based on the aspects of craft you have chosen. Write a 1 to 2-page response.

    Assessment:
    I will use the critical thinking rubric developed by the Department of English to assess this project. We will be discussing this rubric throughout the semester. For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills: Analyze, Develop, Organize.

    Assignment #2
    Self-Evaluation (CTW)

    Objectives
    *Understand the concept of "reading as a writer," i.e. reading with an eye toward the craft of writing
    *Analyze a literary texxt "as a writer"
    *Develop a clear argument
    *Organize a clear argument

    This assignment asks you to look back at the creative work you have done over the semester and evaluate your evolution as an artist and craftsperson. Your self-evaluation should be 3 to 4 pages and should combine an honest and thorough critique of the fiction you wrote and revised this semester and a reflection of what you learned about writing fiction from workshop discussions and from reading the anthology.


    Assessment:
    I will use the critical thinking rubric developed by the Department of English to assess this project. We will be discussing this rubric throughout the semester. For this assignment, I will be assessing the following skills: Analyze, Evaluate, Develop, Organize.


    Rational:
    See description of assignments


    Major: English
    Course Name: Senior Seminar: Rhetoric, Advanced Composition and Technical Writing
    Assignment:>
    Reading Response 1: Images of Writing/Writers
    For this short paper, find five-eight images or descriptions of writing or writers. Analyze the cultural values about writing in these images and explain what types of writing are represented. Be sure to contextualize the images/descriptions—where you found them, the time period, context, etc. These may be from the Internet (art sites, etc.), newspapers (cartoons, articles), magazines, syllabi, workplace documents, etc. If you choose them all from one setting (academic), you may be able to conjecture what a certain profession thinks of writing at a certain cultural moment. If you choose varied images, you’ll get a broad sense of how writing has evolved. Please be sure to include copies of the images (where possible) and full citation information so we can find them later.

    These responses are designed to help you explore ideas, but final drafts should be focused and aimed toward helping us understand your claim or viewpoint. I imagine you’ll need 2-4 pages typed, double-spaced to accomplish this task.
    Use MLA style for cited material.

    Assessment: This will count as a reading response, but will also be assessed as a CTW assignment on summary, analysis, contextualizing, and comparison and contrast.

    Reading Response 5, Due Tues. Oct. 30

    For this reading response, please listen attentively to your peers’ book review presentations and take notes on the books. Write a summary of each of the books, its importance, context, etc. Compare and contrast it to the other books you read and heard about. Describe what you liked about each presentation itself, the way the groups collaborated, etc. Finally, write a reaction to the books (you may combine the response section if you like).

    These responses are designed to help you explore ideas, but final drafts should be focused and aimed toward helping us understand your claim or viewpoint. I imagine you’ll need 2-3 pages typed, double-spaced to accomplish this task. Use MLA style for cited material.

    Assessment: These count as a reading response grade but will also be assessed as a CTW assignment on summary, comparison/contrast, and evaluation.

    Reading Response 5, Due Tues. Oct. 30

    For this reading response, please listen attentively to your peers’ book review presentations and take notes on the books. Write a summary of each of the books, its importance, context, etc. Compare and contrast it to the other books you read and heard about. Describe what you liked about each presentation itself, the way the groups collaborated, etc. Finally, write a reaction to the books (you may combine the response section if you like).

    These responses are designed to help you explore ideas, but final drafts should be focused and aimed toward helping us understand your claim or viewpoint. I imagine you’ll need 2-3 pages typed, double-spaced to accomplish this task. Use MLA style for cited material.

    Assessment: These count as a reading response grade but will also be assessed as a CTW assignment on summary, comparison/contrast, and evaluation.



    Rational:
    See description of assignments


    Major: English
    Course Name: Senior Seminar: Secondary English
    Assignment:>
    Article summary, 1 page (5%)
    Find a critical article on Death of a Salesman or Fences (at least eight pages in length) that examines aspects of the play that could be integrated in the teaching of this literary work on the secondary level. Provide a summary of the article that succinctly states the article’s thesis, summarize the main argument, and evaluate its use of evidence in developing its argument. You will submit this assignment online, and it will be graded as a CTW assignment.

    Assessment:
    Summary – Your summary should clearly identify the main idea or ideas, should provide adequate amount of supporting detail, and should remain faithful to the text.
    Analysis – Your summary should identify component parts of a larger whole, should recognize the organization of the parts, and should explain how the parts work together to build meaning of the whole.
    Evaluate - Your summary should assess the value of materials based on appropriate criteria.


    Compare/ contrast writing on Death of a Salesman and Fences, 3 pages (10% each)
    Write a short essay that focuses a significant point of similarity or difference between Death of a Salesman and Fences that you would be interested in exploring when teaching these works on the secondary level. Explore the way the topic you have selected is presented in each text and how the two texts speak to one another when considered side by side on this particular point. Indicate any conclusions that emerge from this comparison or contrast. You will submit this assignment online, and it will be graded as a CTW assignment.

    Assessment:
    Compare and Contrast – Your short essay should demonstrate an understanding of each text’s core issues, should establish an appropriate point of comparison, and should draw relevant conclusions.
    Organization – Your short essay should present a clearly defined central position, should sequence main ideas and supporting ideas in a manner that effectively supports the main idea, and should make effective use of transitions of connect ideas, sentences, and/ or paragraphs.

    3) Close Reading Exercise on poetry from Collected Poems of Wilfred Owen, 2-3 pages (10%)
    Choose a Wilfred Owen poem from the collection that we did not discuss in class which would be well suited for teaching at the secondary level. Follow the steps on close reading instructions that we went over in class. Come to some conclusion about the meaning of the poem, and write a 2-3 page argument about the meaning of the poem based on your close reading.

    Assessment:
    Interpretation – Your close reading should demonstrate an understanding of the literal meaning of the poem but should also provide conclusions that go beyond a literal of basic understanding.
    Analysis – Your summary should identify component parts of a larger whole, should recognize the organization of the parts, and should explain how the parts work together to build meaning of the whole.
    Organization – Your short essay should present a clearly defined central position, should sequence main ideas and supporting ideas in a manner that effectively supports the main idea, and should make effective use of transitions of connect ideas, sentences, and/ or paragraphs.


    4) A two-page response to an English Education conference you attended, 2 pages (5%)
    Write a report about your conference attendance, summarizing what you learning at the various sessions and articulating thoughts on how you plan to apply the knowledge and skills learning at the conference in your future teaching.

    Assessment:
    Summary – Your report should clearly identify the main idea or ideas, should provide adequate amount of supporting detail, and should remain faithful to the experience.
    Apply – Your report should demonstrate understanding of the cores issues presented at the conference, should demonstrate an ability to utilize disciplinary knowledge, and should pose appropriate questions or conclusions.



    Rational:
    See description of assignments


    Major: Finance
    Course Name: Financial Analysis / Introduction to Commercial Loan Structuring
    Assignment:>
    FIRST ASSIGNMENT: (assigned on the first day of class after groups have been formed)

    Write a 1-page autobiography. Include an introduction, three body paragraphs (an historical detail about yourself, a current detail about yourself and a future detail about yourself), and a conclusion. Each paragraph should have a topic sentence and at least three supporting details.

    Your paper must be single spaced, 12-point type, one-inch margins on all sides, and cannot exceed one page in length.

    On Tuesday, you will share your autobiography with members in your group. You must bring 4 copies of your paper to class. Each group member will read and grade (according to the autobiography rubric posted on WebCT) your paper. Rubric grades and a copy of your paper will then be turned in to your instructor.


    SECOND ASSIGNMENT:
    Please read the article at the following link:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20040173/

    Your assignment is to create four PowerPoint slides describing yourself using your autobiography as the basis for your slides. Your first slide should be about you in general (approximately, but not limited to, what you say in the first paragraph of your autobiography). Your second slide should be about the historical fact, the third slide about the current fact and the fourth slide about the future fact that you described in your autobiography. You can add information to what you discussed in your written autobiography for each of the facts, but you CANNOT change any of the facts. That is, if your historical fact was that when you were 12 years old you climbed to the top of Mt. Everest, you cannot change the fact to when you were 8 years old you fell out of a plane at 10,000 feet without a parachute and survived. You must stick with the Mt. Everest fact in your PowerPoint. Thus, think of the PowerPoint as a visual presentation of your paper.

    Your PowerPoint slides will be shown to the entire class without any narration. That is, you will show us your four slides, but you cannot speak or fill in any gaps as the slides show. All you can do is click to move to the next slide when you think sufficient time has been allowed to view. You can use any dynamic features allowed in PowerPoint except for verbal narration (i.e., music or other sound effects are allowed). Also, similar to the link restrictions, you cannot include hyperlinks or videos.

    The goal of this assignment is to be as creative as possible. Think of this in terms of the link above. There are indications that other school and possibly employers are considering making a personal PowerPoint presentation to be part of the school or job application process.

    You can and most certainly should involve your group members in your PowerPoint creation. You can discuss your ideas, ask for feedback, get assistance from one another on PowerPoint creation, etc. Although each individual must create his/her own presentation, this is very much a group assignment.


    THIRD ASSIGNMENT

    First, print and review the following documents (all posted on uLearn) concerning Sealard Technology:

    · Sealard - Common Size Income Statements.pdf
    · Sealard – Ratios and DuPont Equation.pdf
    · Sealard – Statement of Cash Flows.pdf
    · Sealard – Basic Proforma Statement.pdf

    Carefully read the case and analyze the data in these files/tables. Then, write a two page SWOT analysis for Sealard Technology. I posted a file entitled, “An Overview of SWOT Analysis” for you to get a basic idea of what a SWOT analysis entails. Note that this is a generic description and listing of ideas – these may or may not apply to Sealard. These are just meant to assist you in determining/identifying some strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats for Sealard.

    Your paper should have 6 paragraphs. In the first paragraph describe the company and industry. The second paragraph should describe and defend (what you consider to be the) two key strengths of Sealard Technology. State what you think is a strength and then give some support for your statement. I want you to get into the habit of making a statement and then supporting that statement. The ‘support’ you cite may be from the data tables, the text of the case or from something that you think the case or data implies. The statement should be one sentence and the support should be one sentence. Then do the same for a second strength. If you do this correctly, the “Strength” paragraph should be four sentences long.

    Follow the same procedure for weaknesses (paragraph 3), opportunities (paragraph 4) and threats (paragraph 5). Be sure to write complete and logical sentences. Also be sure to vary your sentence formats so that each paragraph is unique – not just carbon copies of one another. Also, be sure your paragraphs are interesting. Do not present is just a list format or style.
    The final paragraph should indicate your summary evaluation and recommendation to the company. (Note the final two sentences in the case: “What was needed now, they concluded, was a well-thought-out financial plan. Thus, in May of 1995, they hired a consultant (you) to analyze the firm's past, current and future forecasted positions. They want an evaluation of the financial management of the company to date and a course of action recommendation about future operations and financing”).

    Your paper CANNOT exceed two pages in length, double spaced, Times Roman 12 pt type with one inch margins on all sides. Your name should appear in the upper right hand corner of the paper. Staple your paper BEFORE coming to class!!!


    Rational:


    Major: Film
    Course Name: Film Theory and Criticism
    Assignment:>
    The first writing exercise is to write a good thesis statement about a film, a single sentence articulating an argument that could be supported in a longer paper. The writing assignment gives a checklist that details the qualities of a good thesis, allowing the student to check his/her work. Putting this exercise first tells the students that they must have a solid argument about a film before they can write an insightful paper. Coming up with a good thesis will be part of all subsequent exercises.

    The focus of the second exercise is on description of a particular example within a film that could be used as supporting evidence for the student’s thesis. A successful exercise contains a good thesis statement and a thorough description (using appropriate film terminology) of a moment from the film that could be used to help establish the thesis. At this point the students don’t have to argue anything; they just have to demonstrate the ability to describe.

    Exercise three requires the student to link the overall thesis with a particular example in a “unit of criticism.” The lesson here is that convincing criticism links objective description to interpretive analysis. The student writes a thesis statement and then gives a “unit of criticism” which links an individual example to that overall pattern/argument.

    The fourth exercise is to write a two page paper on a film attempting to prove a central thesis. The focus of this exercise is on paragraph structure: using topic sentences, structuring the paper around theme and variation, and so on. Paragraphs use “units of criticism” to supporting detail from particular examples to make the overall case.

    Exercise five is individually geared toward addressing a problem in the student’s writing style. The student must write a two page paper (much like exercise four), but they must also correct bad tendencies in their grammar and/or their written expression. Such problems would include misuse of possessives, a reliance on passive voice, and so on.

    The final exercise turns this process on its head. Having taught the students how to do “it fits” criticism (to find a pattern in a film and to support their argument using examples that fit), the last exercise recognizes that actual texts are more complex than a single pattern. The student writes a three page paper, much like exercises four and five. The difference is that the student must also examine one moment that is an exception to the pattern they’re arguing for, explaining why this moment is an exception.


    Rational:
    This course's assignments are structured around the notion that writing is complex, that it requires a set of discrete skills. Students concentrate on one of these skills at a time by repeating an assignment until they master the skill, then they progress to assignments of increasing complexity. Throughout the assignments the student focuses on proving/supporting a single coherent critical argument about film.


    Major: Film
    Course Name: Senior Seminar in Film
    Assignment:>
    The final assignment will be an individual student research/creative project dealing with some aspect of authorship or audience studies. This project may either be a research paper (15-20 pages), a website (15-20 pages), or a fiction/nonfiction video (5-10 minutes), depending on the student’s preference and previous technical experience (students will not receive technical training in the details of web design or video production as part of this class).

    The student will write a 3 page proposal for the project. Students creating research papers, nonfiction videos, or websites will detail the questions to be investigated and the sources they will use (including bibliography). Those creating fiction videos will present a story synopsis and a statement of their project’s intended meaning/purpose. The instructor will grade these proposals and provide individual feedback.

    After collecting the materials for the paper/website/video, the student will present (in written form) the rhetorical structure of his/her project. The primary document in this assignment will differ based on the type of project. A nonfiction video project will present a segmentation, dividing the project into sections and noting the persuasive function of each. A fiction video student will create a full script. Students preparing a research paper will write an expanded outline for the paper as a whole. Those creating websites will create an expanded site map. This primary document will be accompanied by a 3-5 page paper in which the student articulates the rhetorical/aesthetic decisions they made in designing the project and justifying those decisions in terms of the intended argument/meaning. The instructor will provide individual feedback. The student will then revise the rhetorical structure writeup and submit this version to the instructor for a second evaluation and a grade.

    Students will be placed into small groups (around 5 members each) with other students doing the same type of project. Within the small group, each student will present a short segment of his/her project along with the rhetorical structure written assignment. Video students will present a 3 minute edited segment of their project. Those creating websites will present a sample module from the site. Those writing papers will present the first half of the paper to be read by all students in the group. Each student in the group will provide feedback on how effective the project sample is in making its argument and achieving its goal (articulated in the written rhetorical structure). Students make suggestions on how the final project may be improved. Students then can incorporate the feedback before they finish the project and hand it in for a second assessment by the group members and a final grade from the instructor. All projects will be “published” on a public website for the class (involving streaming videos, links to individual sites, and PDFs of papers).



    Rational:
    This course assumes that research papers and effective videos/websites all present arguments, and the written assignments focus on articulating and sharpening those arguments through feedback and rewriting. Students develop critical thinking by comparing the aims of their peers' projects with intermediate steps in project execution, evaluating the effectiveness of the argument.


    Major: French
    Course Name: Introduction to the Analysis of Literary Texts
    Assignment:>
    As for all literature courses, assignments will take two forms: 1) commentaries of literary texts (following the pattern of the famous and classical French “explication de textes” based on excerpts of prose, theater and poetry and 2) thematic essays on literary topics related to the works studied in class.

    Rational:
    Students in this CTW course are able to apply their critical judgment by writing commentaries or essays on literary texts. More specifically, students who think critically about French literature can: 1. Interpret (categorize, decide significance, clarify meaning), 2. Analyze (examine ideas, identify arguments, analyze arguments), 3. Evaluate (assess claims, assess arguments), 4. Infer (query evidence, conjecture alternatives, draw conclusiong), 5. Explain (state results, justify procedures, present arguments), 6. Self-reflect (self-examine, self-correct).
    In this course, one commentary and one essay will be assessed. Each assignment will receive three ratings: the first will focus on the Interpretation and Analysis skills based on the detailed outline submitted by the student; the second will primarily focus on the Evaluation, Inference, Explanation skills (first draft) and the third on the Self-reflection skill (final draft after rewriting).


    Major: French
    Course Name: French Civilization
    Assignment:>
    As for all civilization courses, CTW assignments for this course will be essay ("dissertation française) "on a cultural topics (social, artistic and political), with an emphasis on comparison, either within the target culture or with another culture.

    Rational:
    Students in this CTW course are able to apply their critical judgment by writing essays on cultural topics. More specifically, students who think critically about French culture can: 1. Interpret (categorize, decide significance, clarify meaning), 2. Analyze (examine ideas, identify arguments, analyze arguments), 3. Evaluate (assess claims, assess arguments), 4. Infer (query evidence, conjecture alternatives, draw conclusiong), 5. Explain (state results, justify procedures, present arguments), 6. Self-reflect (self-examine, self-correct).
    In this course, two essays will be assessed. Each assignment will receive three ratings: the first will focus on the Interpretation and Analysis skills based on the detailed outline submitted by the student; the second will primarily focus on the Evaluation, Inference, Explanation skills (first draft) and the third on the Self-reflection skill (final draft after rewriting).


    Major: French
    Course Name: Contemporary France
    Assignment:>
    As in all civilization courses, CTW assignments will be essays ("dissertation française") on cultural topics (social, artistic and political), with an emphasis on comparison, either within the target culture or with another culture.

    Rational:
    Students in this CTW course are able to apply their critical judgment by writing essays on cultural topics. More specifically, students who think critically about French culture can: 1. Interpret (categorize, decide significance, clarify meaning), 2. Analyze (examine ideas, identify arguments, analyze arguments), 3. Evaluate (assess claims, assess arguments), 4. Infer (query evidence, conjecture alternatives, draw conclusiong), 5. Explain (state results, justify procedures, present arguments), 6. Self-reflect (self-examine, self-correct).
    In this course, two essays will be assessed. Each assignment will receive three ratings: the first will focus on the Interpretation and Analysis skills based on the detailed outline submitted by the student; the second will primarily focus on the Evaluation, Inference, Explanation skills (first draft) and the third on the Self-reflection skill (final draft after rewriting).


    Major: Geography
    Course Name: Urban Geography
    Assignment:>
    REFLECTIONS
    In at least one paragraph and not more than one page, you should reflect on the readings by exploring the connections of the authors’ arguments. Your reflection papers may be guided by the questions posed each week in the syllabus. For example, you may consider whether the authors are essentially agreeing or disagreeing. Your reflection will be collected on Wednesday of each week (unless otherwise noted), although you may skip three weeks without penalty. The purpose of reflection papers is to encourage you to read carefully, and consider critically, the literature being explored and to articulate your thoughts on paper.

    You are required to rewrite at least two of your reflection papers during the semester.


    FINAL PROJECT
    Given that this course is about urbanization and the experiences of different urban places, students will have an opportunity to analyze an urban theme in more detail, using Atlanta as a case study to illustrate that theme. You will need to submit a proposal for your project on September 19th and a progress report on October 29th. You will receive feedback on both of these drafts, which should be reflected in improvements made to the design and implementation of your final paper. Final projects will be presented/turned in on December 4th or 6th.

    FINAL EXAM
    The final exam will be a take-home, essay exam, which will be due on December 12th by 12:30 p.m., although early submission is encouraged.


    Rational:
    Students will be required to write often and to respond to the instructor's feedback. The short-paper assignments provide students with the opportunity to engage in academic literature, recognizing arguments, and synthesizing the kinds of "conversations" going on among scholars.


    Major: BIS
    Course Name: Urban Geography
    Assignment:>
    REFLECTIONS
    In at least one paragraph and not more than one page, you should reflect on the readings by exploring the connections of the authors’ arguments. Your reflection papers may be guided by the questions posed each week in the syllabus. For example, you may consider whether the authors are essentially agreeing or disagreeing. Your reflection will be collected on Wednesday of each week (unless otherwise noted), although you may skip three weeks without penalty. The purpose of reflection papers is to encourage you to read carefully, and consider critically, the literature being explored and to articulate your thoughts on paper.

    You are required to rewrite at least two of your reflection papers during the semester.


    FINAL PROJECT
    Given that this course is about urbanization and the experiences of different urban places, students will have an opportunity to analyze an urban theme in more detail, using Atlanta as a case study to illustrate that theme. You will need to submit a proposal for your project on September 19th and a progress report on October 29th. You will receive feedback on both of these drafts, which should be reflected in improvements made to the design and implementation of your final paper. Final projects will be presented/turned in on December 4th or 6th.

    FINAL EXAM
    The final exam will be a take-home, essay exam, which will be due on December 12th by 12:30 p.m., although early submission is encouraged.


    Rational:
    Students will be required to write often and to respond to the instructor's feedback. The short-paper assignments provide students with the opportunity to engage in academic literature, recognizing arguments, and synthesizing the kinds of "conversations" going on among scholars.


    Major: Geography
    Course Name: Climatic Change
    Assignment:>
    Geography 4784: Literature-Review Paper


    I. Overview
    For this assignment, you will explore a specific topic within the area of climatic change by synthesizing research previously conducted by others. This "literature review" is an essential component of a research proposal, thesis, and dissertation; when created for those purposes, the review is often used to summarize published studies and – more importantly – reveal major deficiencies of those studies. A literature review often is found at the beginning of a research paper, since the research questions posed in the paper stem from information distilled from the literature review. A literature review also can be employed in a critique-based paper.

    The expectation of students in Geography 4784 is a summarization of published research on a specific topic. Please be advised that you should be as comprehensive as possible in your review of the literature; therefore, choosing a topic that has not be studied extensively is a wise move. It would be extremely impressive if you could determine the major deficiencies (i.e. "gaps") in the literature, but that is a difficult accomplishment over a period of several months. It is my firm belief that the researching and writing of your literature-review paper can be a much more intellectually productive activity for you than is the absorption of information in lectures as well as the perusal of textbooks and class notes. Moreover, if the topic for your paper is selected carefully, then he work you perform on it can be transferable to other courses. For example, you may choose to use your paper as the foundation for a senior thesis or M.A. thesis, either now or in the future.

    II. Components of the Assignment
    In order to ensure that the development of the literature-review paper occurs continuously throughout the semester, the various components of the assignment are due on varying dates. The components are as follows:
    • Proposal: The proposal should contain a single sentence that states what your topic is and the minimum number of references that can be found for that topic. I will look at these sentences to determine which topics are too broad, too narrow, not well related to climatic change, etc. The proposal is due in class on 13 September 2007.
    • Rough Draft: The rough draft should be an early draft of your paper. By submitting a rough draft, you are allowing me to review it and provide you with extremely beneficial feedback. As a result, you will receive suggestions on how to improve your paper. The rough draft is on 15 November 2007.
    • Presentation: The presentation should be a three-minute “lecture” to the course on your specific topic. Presentations will take place on 4 December 2007 and 6 December 2007.
    • Final Draft: The final draft will in no way represent the ultimate draft of the paper. In fact, there is no true "final" draft of any paper. Your final draft will be a version of your paper that you choose to submit after making revisions – which are often substantial – to your paper. The final draft is due in class on 13 December 2007.
    All submitted materials (i.e. proposal, rough draft, and final draft) should be typed double-spaced in 12-pt Times New Roman font on single side of paper.

    III. Documentation of Sources
    Your literature-review paper should contain a substantial number of references. In fact, nearly every sentence – except for the topic sentences – should have one or more references, especially if you are simply synthesizing information from previously published studies. At all possible costs, you should only examine and cite peer-reviewed papers, because those papers have been reviewed by experts. You should avoid grey literature, which is comprised mostly of government reports and conference proceedings. Often the information in grey literature is unreliable and even false. Parenthetical documentation should be used to cite all sources. Finally, all sources cited in the text should be presented in a list of references following the Association of American Geographers format, which is as follows for journal articles, books,
    book chapters, respectively:

    Diem, J.E. 2003. Potential impact of ozone on coniferous forests of the interior southwestern United States. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 93:265-280.

    Brown, D. E. 1998. Biotic communities of the Southwest. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press.

    Bytnerowicz, A., and N. E. Grulke. 1992. Physiological effects of air pollutants on western forests. In The response of western forests to air pollution, ed. R. E. Olson, D. Binkley, and M. Böhm, 183–34. New York: Springer-Verlag.


    Rational:
    Students will be required to write often and to respond to the instructor's feedback. The short-paper assignments provide students with the opportunity to engage in academic literature, recognizing arguments, and synthesizing the kinds of "conversations" going on among scholars.


    Major: Geography
    Course Name: Senior Seminar
    Assignment:>
    For Geog 4830 Senior Seminar, students will be required to submit short response papers in addition to multiple drafts of a term paper. Short papers will provide an opportunity for students to engage in particular paradigms that characterize geographic knowledge. The term paper will be an opportunity for students to develop an original research paper. The instructor will provide feedback on various stages of the student work, including proposals, detailed outlines, and drafts of the paper. Students will be assessed based on their ability to synthesize literature and to construct cogent arguments.

    Rational:
    Students will be required to write often and to respond to the instructor's feedback. The short-paper assignments provide students with the opportunity to engage in academic literature, recognizing arguments, and synthesizing the kinds of "conversations" going on among scholars.


    Major: Geology
    Course Name: Sedimentary Environments and Stratigraphy
    Assignment:>
    Geol 4006

    Geology of Georgia project

    Due dates:
    Topics selected Feb 4, 2008
    Annotated References turned in Feb 27, 2008
    Outline from each person Mar 12, 2008
    Figures from each group/person Mar 26, 2008
    Paper Due Apr 9, 2008
    Revised paper due Apr 30,2008
    Presentation April 28, 2008

    Overview
    The purpose of this project is to analyze, synthesize, interpret, and communicate the state of knowledge regarding the sedimentary environments and stratigraphy represented by the rocks and sediment of Georgia. Each student will go through a semester-long process of building an individual paper, and then synthesizing his or her paper with those of his or her classmates.
    Each group will present the geology of Georgia for your era: the Paleozoic of Georgia, the Mesozoic of Georgia, and the Cenozoic of Georgia. Each student in the group will write a “chapter” in a “guide” to the Geology of Georgia. The guide should be organized by geologic time, i.e. systems, series, or formations will be the chapters.
    The rocks you want to focus on are those Sedimentary rocks found on the surface, but some rocks may only be found in the subsurface; you should include these in your guide as well. The focus will be the sedimentary sequence, but igneous rocks may intrude the sedimentary rocks so these rocks can be included in the guide too. Each group will coordinate so the individual papers of the group fit together to form a single guide for your era’s rocks of Georgia.
    Each Era “section” will begin with an overview of that era. This introduction to your group’s era will be written by the graduate student in your group. I will look to the graduate student to coordinate the group and keep the group on task.
    Your paper should thoroughly address your topic. A suggested organizational scheme for your system or series that you may be writing on would be first to discuss the rock units found i.e. the stratigraphy; and then to discuss the depositional history that this sequence of strata represents. You may have multiple depositional environments so each should be discussed.

    Here are some expectations for your group and paper:
    1. Each era will be thoroughly covered. All the strata for that era will be discussed.
    2. Areas where the rocks outcrop in Georgia will be clearly discussed.
    3. The depositional history for your geologic time will be discussed. This may take coordination to have this completely discussed. Geological depositional events may cross the boundaries that you have set for individual papers, thus two or more students may have to collaborate to discuss the depositional history.
    4. The Geological “guide” your group produces should read not as separate papers but as a unified text. (I recognize that each person will have a varied writing style, but I don’t want to read duplication of the same material from student to student “chapters”.)
    5. Each student will do roughly equal work compared to the others in that group.
    6. The paper will be between 8 to 10 pages, double-spaced with 1-inch margins. Illustrations, figures, tables, and the references section are not included in the page count. Figures do not have to be embedded into the text.
    7. Each “chapter” will have a references section. It does not have to be separated from the text, it can begin two lines below the last sentence of the “chapter”.
    8. You must reference all ideas and data using the citation style of the Geological Society of America (see recent issue of Geology for examples). Figures must be neatly referenced and clearly reproduced. If you make your own tables be sure to reference the source for the data. Captions are essential. Either include them on the same page as the figure or put them on the adjoining page.
    9. Do not plagiarize. It will be discovered. The University policy on plagiarism is here: http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwdos/codeofconduct_conpol.html. Here are some resources on plagiarism: http://www2.gsu.edu/~geotel/plagiarism%20links.html.

    I. PAPER
    Before you start, read papers on the general geology of Georgia. Begin your research by collecting a few appropriate papers. Read these and most importantly, read those associated articles that the original paper references which are pertinent to your topic. Reading scientific papers is a learned skill as well as a learning activity. It will help you to learn to write better. You can use the internet to find good papers, but rarely are useful references found online. The best sources are papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Often it helps students to set up a review sheet for each paper you read. Print out a few copies of the following in table form: Author; Title; Reference; Topic; Date you read the paper; Main ideas; Data new to the paper; Old data and the reference; Logic flow used in paper; Conclusions reached by author. When you are reading, fill in this information. Also relate the data to their conclusions and determine if this is reasonable. Make notes of any flaws or omissions of logic.
    During the semester, we will periodically discuss aspects of this project, including 1) Library research; 2) Assessing the quality of publications; 3) writing and citation styles; and others.

    II. PRESENTATION
    You are responsible for presenting the stratigraphy of your “chapter” to the class in a 12 minute talk. This is the standard length of a talk at a professional meeting. It is a lot of time, provided you fill it with well organized material and practice giving the talk. Do not try to cram every detail of your paper into your talk. Instead, focus on the main issues. Spend about 3 minutes total on Introduction and Regional Geology .Devote about 5 minutes to the Stratigraphy and another 3 on Depositional history. Wrap it up with a short Conclusion. Key figures should be shown using Powerpoint, which we will go over in class.
    Grading will focus on the actual presentation. The presentation is worth 50 of the 150 possible points. You will not be graded on content per se (the paper grade reflects that). Instead, you will be graded on the quality of your presentation. Is it well organized? Does the speaker present the information clearly? Can the audience see/ hear/ understand the overheads? Does the speaker end early or late?

    PRESENTATION:
    Knowledgeable about subject;
    Logical explanations;
    Professional;
    Helpful visuals
    Audible
    Finishes on time

    You must practice! People can ask questions after you are finished. Hint: be sure you understand the topic! Then practice your presentation with your group and encourage them to ask questions, and to alert you to confusing definitions or illogical conclusions.




    Rational:
    Students will be required to write often and to respond to the instructor's feedback. The short-paper assignments provide students with the opportunity to engage in academic literature, recognizing arguments, and synthesizing the kinds of "conversations" going on among scholars.


    Major: Geology
    Course Name: Critical Thought and Analysis in the Geological Sciences
    Assignment:>
    Geol 4xxx
    Written assignments

    Essays will be assigned for several different topics. Each student will write the essay, following carefully the restrictions regarding length, scope, and format. Following a class discussion, each essay will be critiqued and turned back for re-write. The re-written essay will be critiqued, the results serving as the grade on that essay. A distributed rubric will serve as the template for the critique.

    Sample writing assignments:

    1. Anatomy of a Mountain Belt:
    Review the arguments for the formation of mountains by the geosynclinal theory and the plate tectonic theory. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of each. (Note, a weakness in one theory does not necessarily constitute a strength in the other.)

    Prepare two one-page papers, one making an argument in favor of the geosynclinal theory and the other in favor of the plate tectonic theory. Identify and elaborate on any “fatal flaw(s)” you can find with either theory.

    2. Unconformities:
    “Traced far enough, all unconformities become conformities.” Spend some time considering and evaluating this proposition, sketching in your mind and on paper how unconformities look as they are traced toward and away from the sediment source area. Prepare a one-page paper showing how the statement must correct, using as appropriate the null hypothesis.

    3. The Holy Trinity of Stratigraphy:
    Lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and chronostratigraphy have been called the holy trinity of stratigraphy by Derek Ager. Ager argues that all three of these are mental constructs which obscure the real goal of stratigraphy which is the correlation of events. Yet, as Ager says, we “see” rocks and there “is” time, and we cannot have witnessed the events. So what are we to do? Prepare a three-page paper evaluating the nature of this impasse, and what it means to enlightened interpretation of the stratigraphic record.

    4. Dependable Ridges:
    It has been pointed out by Turcotte that despite the great number of variables possible in the process of partial melting of the mantle to produce the ocean floors, the chemistry of MOR basalts is remarkably consistent from ocean to ocean. Is this really true, and if it is, is it so unexpected after all? Prepare a three-page essay addressing this observation and commenting on possible explanations.


    Rational:
    Students will be required to write often and to respond to the instructor's feedback. The short-paper assignments provide students with the opportunity to engage in academic literature, recognizing arguments, and synthesizing the kinds of "conversations" going on among scholars.


    Major: German
    Course Name: GRMN Advanced German I
    Assignment:>
    Assignment 1: Students are given a copy of the American Bill of Rights in German. They are then asked to choose one of the amendments and reflect on its impact on American culture and investigate if this right is guaranteed in Germany (or should be).

    Assignment 2: Students write a reflective essay on what it means to be "other" in Germany. This may be from personal experience as many of our majors are from Bosnia and other Eastern European countries and have experienced it first hand, or it may be based on research.


    Rational:
    A technical skill, including language learning, is one which can be taught in the same way across a number of contexts without necessarily involving an individual's basic feelings, beliefs or motives in any significant way. A technical skill, then, can be learned in the same manner regardless of whether one is a fair-minded or compassionate individual or whether one has foundational knowledge in any particular subject. Critical and creative thinking are not these types of skills. Rather, developing these thinking abilities involves will or desire on the part of the thinker to go beyond what is given and to make an attempt to understand the self and question the motives of others. Such thinking is highly dependent upon human purpose. These types of assignments encourage this type of cross-cultural reflection that involves both the self and the other. Students will be advised at the beginning of the course that the types of questions below will aid them in this quest and give them an advanced organzier as to how to write a critical essay.
    Types of Critical Questions
    1. Questions of clarification:
    Examples
    —Could you give me an example?
    —Is your basic point ___or___?
    2. Questions that probe assumptions:
    Examples
    —You seem to be assuming ___
    —How would you justify taking this for granted?
    —Is this always the case?
    3. Questions that probe reasons and evidence:
    Examples
    —How could we go about finding out whether that is true?
    —Is there reason to doubt that evidence?
    4. Questions about viewpoints or perspectives:
    Examples
    —How would other groups or types of people respond? Why? What would influence them?
    —How would people who disagree with this viewpoint argue their case?
    5. Questions that probe implications and consequences:
    Examples
    —What effect would that have?
    —If this and this are the case, then what else must also be true?
    6. Questions about the question:
    Examples
    —To answer this question, what questions would we have to answer first?
    —Is this the same issue as . . . ?


    Major: German
    Course Name: Advanced Grammar: Morphology and Syntax
    Assignment:>
    Assignment 3: (Business German - Translation/Grammar)
    Students are given newspaper article on the German automobile industry ("Free access for everyone to all markets of the world--that is what the German automobile industry pleads for")
    In addition to the standard reading comprehension questions (identifying appropriate headlines, naming the countries with certain influences on this market, providing statistics from the text and marking the most important presuppositions for a world-wide automobile industry), the reading comprehension is expanded to include critical thinking: Who do you think is the author of the article? What is his job title? How is he connected to the topic of this article? Where in the text does the author state his opinion concerning a free world market for the German automobile industry? What would be the implications of such a market on the US economy?

    Assignment 4: (Morphology)
    Students are asked in a short research paper to investigate the nature of "hate" speech, what words or statements are considered inflammatory in the target culture and why certain slurs are accepted in some cultures and not in others (sociological as well as lexical analysis): e.g.
    "Neger" in German as apposed to the American equivalent.



    Rational:
    Although the assignments require a more sophisticated proficiency level in the target language, the students are encouraged to go beyond oral and written communicative competence and integrate problem solving strategies into their learning. The are encouraged to contextualize tasks in a business setting, for example, reflecting on, analyzing and critically evaluating business information and practice. They are encouraged to reasses their own prejudices and consider the validity of other cultural norms that they may perceive as exclusive and xenophobic. The following comments are possible when they are asked to rewrite their essays and should foster a measureable development in critical thinking skills :
    1. Questions of clarification:
    Examples
    —Could you give me an example?
    —Is your basic point ___or___?
    2. Questions that probe assumptions:
    Examples
    —You seem to be assuming ___
    —How would you justify taking this for granted?
    —Is this always the case?
    3. Questions that probe reasons and evidence:
    Examples
    —How could we go about finding out whether that is true?
    —Is there reason to doubt that evidence?
    4. Questions about viewpoints or perspectives:
    Examples
    —How would other groups or types of people respond? Why? What would influence them?
    —How would people who disagree with this viewpoint argue their case?
    5. Questions that probe implications and consequences:
    Examples
    —What effect would that have?
    —If this and this are the case, then what else must also be true?
    6. Questions about the question:
    Examples
    —To answer this question, what questions would we have to answer first?
    —Is this the same issue as . . . ?


    Major: Hospitality
    Course Name: Hospitality Strategic Management
    Assignment:>
    Case Analysis and Presentations including two CTW rewrites

    Each student will analyze three assigned cases and will lead the class in a discussion of one of the cases. These case vignettes are based on realistic managerial/business challenges in the hospitality industry. For two of the cases, each student will do a rewrite based on feedback from the instructor and the class discussion. The rewrites are due one week after original submission deadlines.

    The cases are from the book, “Executive Decisions” by William Fisher, Ph.D.
    (Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association)

    Rubrics for this case assignment are included in this syllabus under R2.

    Team Project

    The class will divide into teams (determined by an analysis of skill areas). Each team will be responsible for components of an analysis of an actual business. The specific research questions will be delineated during the first week of the semester after a class meeting with representatives of the company. The assignment for spring semester 2008 will be an analysis of the Executive Conference Center at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Questions will include a critique of the physical lay-out of the Center including size and types of meeting and event rooms; analysis of A/V and current technology; analysis of the current marketing strategies including a review of the current marketing plan; the financial model of the Center including a competitive analysis of area conference centers; staffing including number and experience level; food and beverage operations including the potential to grow catering business and pricing analysis; consideration of other uses for the facility. Each group will be assigned specific segments of this project.

    Each group will be responsible for keeping a log of their research processes as well as presenting deliverables to the organization by the end of the semester.

    (See R1 for the rubrics for this assignment)

    A preliminary presentation will be conducted by each group. Based on class and instructor feedback, revisions will be expected by the final group presentation date.

    The final group presentation, scheduled for 4/24, will be before key executives from Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Written and verbal feedback will be given to each group from these representatives.



    Rational:
    The case studies and group project entail business decision making situations that involve evaluation and analysis, synthesis of information and application of a variety of business principles and theories including the involved company's core values, organizational structure, financial condition and service standards. Written assignments are included with both types of projects with rubrics developed that target specific critical thinking skills.


    Major: History
    Course Name: Introduction to Historical Studies CTW
    Assignment:>
    After reading and carefully considering all the documents collected in My Lai: A Brief History with Documents, select three sources of different varieties and write a short paper (4 – 5 pages) to be handed in during class describing what could be learned from them. Analyze them as sources of historical knowledge. Consider, for instance, who wrote the source and why? In what context did it originally appear? Was it public or secret? Was it private or widely known? How did people at the time respond to the particular source? What is the nature of the source—is it an economic report, a legal proceeding, a photograph, a memoir—and how does that determine how an historian could use the document in question? You will present your analysis to the rest of the class.

    Each of you will present your ideas for paper topics to the class. We will have a short discussion regarding its viability and its potential, and drawing upon our collective knowledge we will consider potential sources, theoretical models, and pitfalls. You must submit a one-paragraph description of your topic through the Writing Across the Curriculum site by 9:00am. Bring a hardcopy to class.

    Rational:
    Each of these sample assignments asks students to use writing to probe the possibilities inherent to a set of discipline-specific goals, in this case the generic pitfalls and possibilities of historical source material analysis. The second assignment begins the process of crafting critical analysis through the written formulation of the "first step" towards a viable historical thesis that links argument to evidence.

    Students receive feedback in both written and oral forms.


    Major: BIS-Community Studies
    Course Name: Introduction to Historical Studies CTW
    Assignment:>
    After reading and carefully considering all the documents collected in My Lai: A Brief History with Documents, select three sources of different varieties and write a short paper (4 – 5 pages) to be handed in during class describing what could be learned from them. Analyze them as sources of historical knowledge. Consider, for instance, who wrote the source and why? In what context did it originally appear? Was it public or secret? Was it private or widely known? How did people at the time respond to the particular source? What is the nature of the source—is it an economic report, a legal proceeding, a photograph, a memoir—and how does that determine how an historian could use the document in question? You will present your analysis to the rest of the class.

    Each of you will present your ideas for paper topics to the class. We will have a short discussion regarding its viability and its potential, and drawing upon our collective knowledge we will consider potential sources, theoretical models, and pitfalls. You must submit a one-paragraph description of your topic through the Writing Across the Curriculum site by 9:00am. Bring a hardcopy to class.

    Rational:
    Each of these sample assignments asks students to use writing to probe the possibilities inherent to a set of discipline-specific goals, in this case the generic pitfalls and possibilities of historical source material analysis. The second assignment begins the process of crafting critical analysis through the written formulation of the "first step" towards a viable historical thesis that links argument to evidence.

    Students receive feedback in both written and oral forms.


    Major: History
    Course Name: Historical Research CTW
    Assignment:>
    • Analysis of reading and debate with classmate – hand in shall be 3-5 pages (30% of final grade). In the written portion of the assignment, students are expected to provide a brief but closely-reasoned discussion of the thesis, argument, and source materials used by the author of the text.

    • Final Paper (40 % of final grade). Students are expected to produce a series of writing assignments that document their progress towards this paper. You will need to create a thesis statement, a critical description and analysis of the primary sources you will employ as evidence (charting, for instance, who or what created the source, when, and why; the types of information can be obtained from the source and how), and a rough draft. Students will also participate in a peer review process and you will be expected to generate a short critical analysis of one of the paper produced by a colleague.


    Rational:
    The assignments work together to allow students the experience of conceptualizing, researching, drafting an original research project. Students also participate in collegial critiques of others's work.


    Major: Journalism
    Course Name: Advanced Media Writing
    Assignment:>
    Discuss the ethical considerations of live broadcast coverage of an event in which profanity (MTV Awards show) and obscene gestures (Michael Vick’s single finger salute to the Georgia Dome crowd) are a probable element of the story. Should your audience be subjected to these spontaneous expressions? Do these occurrences lend anything of value or substance to your news report? Should any be allowed on the air?


    Write a :30 radio news story based on these facts obtained by your source within the criminal division of the city police department:

    • rape victim: Dorothy Green;19 years old; Central Valley State University student; major: music; minor: art history; Miami, FL, native; 5’8”; 130 pounds; black hair
    • rape suspect: Tom R. Spencer; 35 years old; assistant librarian at CVSU; resides at 3030 Colcord Ave.; police have him in custody for questioning
    • incident: Green studying late at the library and when it closed she left to walk back to her dorm; She was wearing shorts and a halter top when her assailant grabbed her from behind and her go with him in the landscaping in Hurt Park. He tore her clothes and raped her at gunpoint. Before letting her go, he threatened her that if she tried to identify him, she would be “dead, dead, dead.” Upon arriving at her dorm, she asked a resident assistant to call the Women’s Crisis Center. Police arrived at her dorm at 1:20 AM and she went to Grady Hospital for treatment where the sexual assault was confirmed at 3:35 AM.

    Write a :20 radio news bulletin based on these facts you obtained by calling your source within the State Police after you heard on the police scanner about a truck involved in an accident on Interstate 20 near Greensboro:

    • tractor trailer truck carrying radioactive materials overturned 55 miles east of Atlanta
    • Governor, State Police, National Guard, state Environmental Protection Division’s Hazardous Material Unit and the Federal Environmental Protection Agency have been notified
    • Local officials at the scene are trying to determine if the accident site is radioactive
    • All local officials are refusing to comment—referring all questions to state officials
    • The driver of the truck is not at the scene and presumed to be missing
    • Interstate 20 near exit 40 is shut down and traffic is beginning to back up in both directions for miles as no alternative routes have been deemed safe
    • Residents and businesses in the area of exit 40 are being evacuated.


    Rational:
    Rationale for ethical discussion: Students studying journalism learn about the First Amendment and reporting facts, but judgment is used by professional journalists when deciding what to include in coverage and what to exclude. Honing critical thinking skills will help make students aware of how to make judgments better and to recognize the various facets of a situation. In this assignment students will have to weigh the reporting “as it happened” with the offensive nature of the event and how that may affect those who access their coverage. The discussion would include the following topics: First Amendment as an absolute vs. limited protection; ethical standard of Society of Professional Journalists to “do no harm;” making a moral judgment for the audience rather than letting the audience decide individually if it is offensive.

    Rationale for reporting a rape story: Radio journalists have the shortest stories of all journalists so this assignment makes it difficult for students to decide what to include and exclude from their brief story. Critical thinking skills help students understand how journalists value certain kinds of information and often rely on professional standards and conventions to decide what is more worthy of inclusion in a news story that other details. One of the judgments that has to be confronted is disclosing the name of the alleged rape victim as nearly all professional journalists agree to withhold rape victim’s identity. If the name is withheld, then the students will have to decide how to describe the victim, including her student status and the name of the school. This restriction on identity disclosure does not apply to accused rapists, and in this assignment the accused has not been charged but is being questioned.

    Rationale for radioactive bulletin: Life threatening information is often provided by journalists, and in this assignment the students are confronted with getting a little information disseminated to the audience quickly. Critical thinking skills must be used to determine the most important information to be given in as few as three sentences. Judgments must be made regarding how many government agencies which have been notified to reveal to the audience in addition to the traffic and hazardous nature of the incident. Another judgment must be made regarding whether to include that the truck driver is apparently missing.


    Major: Journalism
    Course Name: History of News Media
    Assignment:>
    Focus group assignment:
    To stimulate the conversation this semester, each student joins three focus groups -- focusing on three selected chapters, and on the personalities, events and philosophies therein.
    In choosing Focus Groups, follow your interests in one of two ways by choosing areas in which you know a good deal, or areas about which you would like to know more.
    During the first class meeting, please list six choices—prioritizing your 1st choice through 6th. Your top three preferences will be honored as much as possible, but we need students in all areas so the assignments must be spread evenly among the chapters.
    ESSAYS. Working independently, each member of a Focus Group will write a two- to three-page double-spaced, typed essay on his/her selected Focus Group chapters. These will be graded.
    QUESTIONS. Individual Focus Group members will also come to class with a list of QUESTIONS TO RAISE IN THE CLASS DISCUSSION. In class, the Group combines to raise these questions.
    Grading: The three Focus Groups essays (50 points each) count for 150 points, or 15 percent of the course grade.
    What does a focus group do?
    First, read the assigned readings for the coming week, as everyone else does, but with the idea of leading or stimulating the conversation when your Focus Group is in charge of discussion. As you read, take notes, jotting down what interests you most and raising questions to ask in class.
    Second, after reading the Focus Group chapters, write an essay of two to three pages double spaced, typed.
    Third, during class, you join your Focus Group and help the teacher raise questions, some of which may not easily be answered. As class leaders, you help break down the artificial barriers between teacher and class. You also create new ways of looking at the record of the past 311 years.

    Annotated Bibliography assignment:
    Compose an annotated bibliography, dividing primary and secondary sources. Primary sources are those within the time frame of your paper – including newspapers and magazines of the time (actual or microfilm), letters, government documents, manuscripts, photographs, autobiographies, recorded radio shows and interviews. Secondary sources are usually written ABOUT the period under study – biographies, histories and other books, and articles published after your time period.

    Research report sample assignment:
    This should be a six-page sample of your research paper to be presented to the class. Your classmates and instructor will provide valuable feedback to you.

    Rational:
    The rationale for the focus group assignment is to have the students critically analyze their reading assignment that's due for a particular class period. The written assignment will allow the students to provide their opinions about the readings in an essay format. It is not merely an outline of the chapters or articles; rather, it is engaging the students to provide their assessment of the content. Composing questions from the readings requires the students to think critically about how some of the information in the readings can be used to prompt in-class discussion and learning.
    The rationale for the annotated bibliography assignment is to require the student to concisely summarize important information found in the research of the term's topic. Writing annotations are particularly useful for students of journalism who have to develop critical thinking skills to determine what parts of information from sources are worthy to include in their stories/reports.
    The rationale for the six-page sample of the research report is to engage the student with writing about the topic early in the research process. It satisfies a number of purposes: (1) research on a particular aspect of the topic must be far enough along to allow for six pages to be written; (2) the writing itself can be evaluated at an early stage and valuable feedback provided to help improve the final report; and (3) demonstrates how the research must be synthesized into an originally written paper and can aid in making further research more productive.


    Major: Journalism
    Course Name: Media, Ethics and Society
    Assignment:>
    1. Literature review/outline: The student will submit a preliminary outline of the report based on the review of sources relevant to the topic. The literature review should provide an analysis of the body of knowledge relevant to your topic. Critical thinking skills will be used to assess (1) source credibility; (2) relevancy of sources to the topic; and (3) how portions of the sources can be used in one or more sections of the report. Decision-making is an integral part of critical thinking, and many decisions must be made in the research process. For this assignment decisions about the quality of information found on the topic will be emphasized. It is also related to the practical aspects of journalism in that, media professionals in general, and reporters specifically, must decide what information they will use in their stories and other media creations to disseminate to their audiences.
    Based on what is learned from the sources about the topic, a draft outline of the report can be composed. Critical thinking skills will be used to determine the organization of the information gathered from the literature, and how transitions can be more easily made with grouping some information together. These same skills can help identify what aspects of the topic require more research for the later draft of the full report.
    The literature review will be no more than five pages long.

    2. Ethics description: The student will discuss the ethical dilemma that is the topic of the research report. This assignment will combine elements of the literature review about the dilemma but also include the ethical choices available but not taken in the actual case. Critical thinking skills will be used to determine what the dilemma is and how it could have been resolved by using alternative means. Dilemmas, by definition, require decision making skills to assess what ramifications could occur if different actions are taken. Media professionals and journalists are routinely confronted with decisions which involve ethical choices about how sources are described to their audiences and what specific kinds of information should be divulged in their stories and other original compositions.
    This will be a significant portion of the final research report as the student describes the ethical bases of alternative decisions and/or actions and their possible outcomes. Critical thinking skills will be used to assess these alternatives and whether the possible outcomes would be reasonable to assume to have occurred if they had actually taken place.
    A revision of this paper will be included as part of the final draft of the research report. This assignment would be no more than six pages long.

    3. Take-home final exam: The student will develop her/his own individual code of professional ethics. This will be based on the student’s synthesis of the research report, readings from the textbook, lectures and classroom discussions. At least three professional codes of ethics must be cited and used in the composition of the individual’s ethical code. Critical thinking skills will be used to assess what aspects of the different codes and from what was learned throughout the semester are relevant to the development of the individual’s code of ethics. This will be a maximum of five pages long.


    Rational:


    Major: Kinesiology and Health
    Course Name: Physiology of Exercise
    Assignment:>
    Physiology of Exercise
    KH 3650: Fall, 2007

    Journal Article Summary Assignment

    The purpose of this assignment is to examine original research papers in exercise physiology in scholarly journals and to write a concise summary of the important aspects of each paper. There are a total of five (5) papers to be reviewed, one in each of the following general areas of exercise physiology: Exercise Metabolism, Neuromuscular, Cardiovascular, and Pulmonary. The journal articles will be provided to you in pdf format on uLearn. The article summaries will be due at various times throughout the semester – please see the course schedule. The assignment for each topic area consists of two parts:

    1) Citation - consists of each journal article citation in APA (American Psychological Association) format (see example below).
    2) Journal article summary - a concise description of the major findings and important aspects of each study.

    Please turn in a single, typed page with the citation and summary - see example below.

    Each Journal Article Summary is worth a possible maximum of 10 points, 2 points for the Citation and 8 points for the Journal Article Summary:

    Citation – the article must be cited correctly in the specified format (APA 5th Ed.)

    Journal Article Summary – should be a concise summary of the major findings and important aspects of the study. It should be approximately 1-3 paragraphs in length, and should include the purpose of the study, important details of the study design and methods, and a summary of the results, conclusions, and practical application(s) or significance of the study.




    EXAMPLE

    John Doe
    KH 3650
    Article #1
    09/11/07

    Birkeland, K. I., Stray-Gundersen, J., Hemmersbach, P., Hallen, J., Haug, E., & Bahr, R. (2000). Effect of rhEPO administration on serum levels of sTfR and cycling performance [Electronic version]. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32 (7), 1238-1243.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if blood doping by using recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) improved cycling performance, and if assessment of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) could be used to detect blood doping. Male endurance athletes (n = 20) were given either a placebo or rhEPO by injection 3 times a week for 4 weeks in a random, double-blind fashion. Blood samples were taken at the beginning and 3 times each week of the study, and for 4 weeks during a follow-up period. Time to exhaustion and maximal oxygen consumption were measured on a cycle ergometer.

    There were no changes in blood parameters or in cycling performance in the placebo group. The group receiving the rhEPO increased their VO2max by 7% (from 63.6 to 68.1 ml/kg/min), which was a statistically significant improvement. Hematocrit in the rhEPO group also increased significantly, from 42.7 % to 50.8 %. Serum sTfR was significantly elevated in the rhEPO group, and remained elevated for 1 week after the last rhEPO injection.

    Injections of rhEPO over 4 weeks lead to increases in hematocrit and significant improvements in cycling performance. Improvements in performance may last as long as 3 weeks after the last injection of rhEPO. Elevations of sTfR can potentially be used to detect blood doping by rhEPO, but may only be effective for 1 week after the last injection. Endurance athletes can potentially use injections of rhEPO to raise their hematocrit and improve their performance, and the performance benefits last longer than the methods that are available to accurately detect rhEPO use. Prevention of blood doping by this method will depend upon random, year-round testing and by developing more precise detection methods.


    Example Article:

    Birkeland2000.pdf

    Writing the Citation

    A. Citation

    The citation must be written in American Psychological Association (APA) format – 5th Edition.

    Example:

    Birkeland, K. I., Stray-Gundersen, J., Hemmersbach, P., Hallen, J., Haug, E., & Bahr, R. (2000). Effect of rhEPO administration on serum levels of sTfR and cycling performance [Electronic version]. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 32 (7), 1238-1243.

    Order of citation items and notes for journal articles/periodicals:

    1. Author(s): Last name first, comma, initials of first and middle name. Commas between names of different authors. The last author’s name is preceded by an ampersand (&). List all author’s names – do not use “et al.”

    2. Year of publication: Immediately follows authors - in parentheses followed by a period.

    3. Title of journal article: Capitalize only the first word of the title and of the subtitle, if any, and any proper names. Do not underline, italicize or put quotation marks around the title. End with a period.

    4. Journal name: Write out the full journal name (do not abbreviate), ending with a comma. Italicize or underline the journal name.

    5. Volume: The volume of the journal follows the journal name, and is also italicized or underlined. Separate from page numbers with a comma. If there is a number or issue for the journal, it immediately follows the Volume in parentheses, but is not italicized or underlined.

    6. Page numbers: Write the full beginning and ending page numbers, separated by a hyphen. End with a period. Do not use identifiers such as “pp” or shorten the page numbers (e.g. 1238-43).

    There are some additional citation issues if you have obtained your journal article from an online, electronic journal:

    1. If the article is an exact duplicate of the print version use the same basic primary journal reference but you should add in brackets after the article title "Electronic version" as in the following fictitious example:

    VandenBos, G., Knapp, S., & Doe, J. (2001). Role of reference elements in the selection of resources by psychology undergraduates [Electronic version]. Journal of Bibliographic Research, 5, 117-123.

    2. If you are referencing an online article that you have reason to believe has been changed (e.g., the format differs from the print version or page numbers are not indicated) or that includes additional data or commentaries, you will need to add the date you retrieved the document and the URL.

    VandenBos, G., Knapp, S., & Doe, J. (2001). Role of reference elements in the selection of resources by psychology undergraduates. Journal of Bibliographic Research, 5, 117-123. Retrieved October 13, 2001, from http://jbr.org/articles.html

    3. If you are referencing an article in an Internet-only journal:

    Fredrickson, B. L. (2000, March 7). Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being. Prevention & Treatment, 3, Article 0001a. Retrieved November 20, 2000, from http://journals.apa.org/prevention/volume3/pre0030001a.html

    Find further information about the APA citation style at: APA Online: http://www.apastyle.org/


    B. The Summary

    The summary should be a concise summary of the major findings and important aspects of the study. It should be approximately 1-3 paragraphs in length, and should include the purpose of the study, important details of the study design and methods, and a summary of the results, conclusions, and practical application(s) or significance of the study.

    Make sure that the summary is written in your own words! Do not copy the purpose statement or concluding statements of the authors from the article.

    Lab assignment and sample lab report

    There will be laboratory activities that require participation, written reports, and a final laboratory quiz. See the attached course schedule for lab topics and the current lab manual for details on the labs.

    Measuring Heart Rate and Blood Pressure KH 3650
    Purpose: To learn and apply the concepts of measuring heart rate and blood
    pressure at rest and during exercise

    Concepts: • Palpation • Sphygmomanometer
    • Auscultation • Systolic Blood Pressure
    • Heart Rate Monitor (HRM) • Diastolic Blood Pressure
    • Heart Rate
    Overview:
    Students will locate pulse sites by feel (palpation) and will determine heart rate at rest and during light intensity exercise and will compare their results to a wireless heart rate monitor (HRM). Students will learn the proper placement and operation of the Sphygmomanometer, and will determine systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest and during light intensity exercise.
    Specific Procedures:
    1. Resting Heart Rate (RHR)
    a. Have your subject sit quietly for several minutes. Locate three pulse sites - radial,
    brachial, and carotid
    b. Measure resting heart rate by palpation counting the number of heart beats in 60 seconds.
    Record resting heart rate in beats per minute on the data sheet.
    c. Measure resting heart rate using the wireless Polar Heart Rate Monitor (HRM).
    • Chest strap should be secure, but not restrictively tight
    • The transmitter component should be centered on the chest with the sensing pads
    just underneath the pectoral muscles
    • Using tap water, lightly wet the sensing pads to increase conductivity
    • On Polar watch, press Select button (top right) until Measure appears at the
    bottom of the watch screen.
    • Press Store/Recall button (red button at bottom) to get heart rate. A flashing
    heart will appear to indicate heart rate signal.
    d. Record resting heart rate via HRM in beats per minute on the data sheet.
    e. Calculate the difference in the resting HR between palpation and the HRM.
    2. Resting Blood Pressure (RBP)
    a. Placement of blood pressure cuff (Sphygmomanometer)
    • By palpation, locate the point of the brachial pulse
    • Select the correct size cuff based upon the arm size: small, medium, large
    • Wrap the cuff around the upper arm with the Artery arrow (or the middle of the
    bladder) in line with the brachial artery. The cuff should rest on bare skin, with
    no clothing underneath.



    b. Systolic blood pressure by palpation (without using stethoscope)
    • Palpate the brachial pulse
    • Inflate the cuff to approximately 200 mmHg
    • Slowly release cuff pressure
    • As cuff pressure declines, feel for the resumption of the brachial pulse while
    watching the pressure gauge on the sphygmomanometer
    • The pressure at which the brachial pulse resumes is a good approximation of the
    Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP)
    c. Blood pressure by auscultation (using stethoscope)
    • Place the head of the stethoscope directly over the point of the brachial pulse. Do
    not put under the edge of the blood pressure cuff.
    • Inflate the cuff to approximately 200 mmHg
    • Slowly release cuff pressure
    • As cuff pressure declines, listen for the blood pressure sound
    • The first sound (loud, regular "thumping") is the Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP)
    • The point at which the loud thumping either becomes very muffled or disappears (no sound) is the Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP)
    d. Record resting SBP and DBP on the data sheet for each student
    3. Exercise Heart Rate and Blood Pressure
    a. Position your subject on a Monark cycle ergometer - proper seat height, handlebar
    position, toe strap tightness
    b. Have your subject pedal for a few minutes at a light to moderate exercise intensity - 60-
    90 rpm, 1-2 kg resistance (60 - 180 Watts)
    c. Measure Exercise Heart Rate
    • While the subject continues to pedal, lift 1 arm off of the handlebars and palpate
    the radial pulse
    • Count the number of beats in a 15 second period and convert to beats per minute
    (multiply by 4)
    • Compare to the HR obtained with the HRM
    d. Measure Exercise Blood Pressure
    • While the subject continues to pedal, lift 1 arm off the handlebars and place the
    blood pressure cuff correctly
    • Place the stethoscope head over the brachial artery and measure the blood
    pressure while the subject continues to pedal
    e. Record the exercise HR and BP on the data sheet for each student









    Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Lab
    Summer 2007

    Example ___Stan Marsh___
    assessed by____Eric Cartman____________ assessed by_______ Eric Cartman____________
    systolic ___120____ mm/Hg systolic __118_____mm/Hg
    diastolic __76_____ mm/Hg diastolic __82_____ mm/Hg
    Resting __60_____ BPM Resting ___64____BPM



    Name _____________________________________

    assessed by___________________________ assessed by______________________________
    systolic ___________ mm/Hg systolic ___________ mm/Hg
    diastolic __________ mm/Hg diastolic __________ mm/Hg
    Resting _________ BPM Resting _________ BPM


    Name _____________________________________

    assessed by___________________________ assessed by______________________________
    systolic ___________ mm/Hg systolic ___________ mm/Hg
    diastolic __________ mm/Hg diastolic __________ mm/Hg
    Exercise _________ BPM Exercise _________ BPM




    Barry Bonds
    KH 3650
    National League – Giants
    09/08/2004

    Accuracy of Heart Rate Measurements

    Purpose

    The purpose of this lab was to determine the relative accuracy of two methods to measure heart rate: palpation and a wireless Polar heart rate monitor.

    Results

    Subject Polar Palpation
    1 73 68
    2 77 80
    3 79 77
    4 76 74
    5 97 94
    6 102 98
    7 65 72
    8 89 74
    9 96 88
    10 64 69
    11 76 70
    12 92 86

    Mean = 82.2 79.2

    Mean diff = 82.2 - 79.2 = 3.0

    Discussion

    • Was there a difference between heart rates measured by palpation and by Polar heart rate monitor? If so, was the difference “significant?”
    • During palpation of heart rate, what is being measured? How does the Polar heart rate monitor determine heart rate?
    • What are the sources of error for determining heart rate by palpation and by heart rate monitor? Which method do you think would be consistently the most accurate?
    • What might explain the large range of resting heart rates obtained for the members of the class?

    The mean difference in heart rate measurements was 3 beats per minute (bpm), which does not appear to be a large difference. With a mean HR of 79.2, a difference of 3 bpm is less than a 4% difference, which would not seem to be significant.
    During palpation, the pulse is felt in an artery that is close to the surface of the skin. Each time the heart beats a wave of blood flow (i.e. the pulse) progresses away from the heart and is detected during palpation. The Polar heart rate monitor detects the electrical activity of the heart (via the chest strap) and transmits this to the wrist watch which then displays a heart rate.
    With heart rate by palpation, most sources of error probably involve technician error. When counting for 60 seconds during palpation there is the chance that the technician may not feel the pulse correctly, miscount, or, more likely, have to miss a fraction of the heart rate at the very beginning and end of counting. With the Polar HRM, most sources of error would probably be related to the equipment. The chest strap may not pick up the electrical signal very well, the transmitter may not be working correctly, or the watch may not be receiving the signal correctly. In addition, some other equipment with electrical motors (e.g. treadmills) may interfere with the HR signal.
    Because it is able to constantly able to update its measurement from beat to beat, I would suspect that the Polar heart rate monitor is more accurate, if working correctly.
    The wide range of readings in resting heart rate obtained for the class could be because of a number of reasons. Resting heart rate can be influenced by heredity, exercise training status, current state of “restfulness,” caffeine intake, etc. For example, a subject who had exercised recently or consumed a caffeinated beverage would possibly exhibit a higher resting heart rate. Additionally, the fitness status of the students in the class is probably be different, with those that are physically active, and hence “fitter,” displaying lower resting heart rates.
    In conclusion, it has been shown that measuring heart rate by different methods can provide similar results, but there can be minor differences. A Polar heart rate monitor could possibly be considered more accurate than a technique based on palpation because of reduced possibility of technician error.







    Rational:
    The journal article reviews will require students to critical think as they analyze a research study and determine the worth and relevance along with the meaningfulness of the article and its data. The laboratory assignments will require students to apply the knowledge gained in class during experiments. After conducting the experiments, students will be expected to use the data to make sound and reasonable conclusions.


    Major: Kinesiology and Health
    Course Name: Sexuality Education Inclusive of Special Needs Students
    Assignment:>
    Structured Academic Controversy:
    Abstinence Education vs. Comprehensive Human Sexuality Education

    Overview
    Structured academic controversy requires students to use high level reasoning and critical thinking. At the end of this experience students will experience the following benefits:
    • Increased understanding of both sides of the controversy
    • More insight into ways to formulate an argument
    • Greater mastery and retention of material
    • Ability to generalize concepts to a wider variety of situations and contexts
    • Opportunity to reach a consensus from different points of view
    • Higher academic self-esteem
    • Higher levels of reasoning and different levels of critical thinking skills

    How the Process Works

    1. Instructional materials were given to you to support your position.

    2. You will be divided into two groups
    a. The groups will then be subdivided into pairs (one group will have 3 students).
    b. Individually at home, you will read the literature supporting your position and make notes regarding the main ideas, concepts, and arguments to support your position (written first argument)
    c. The next class, each pair develops a presentation that advocates its position. You will have 20 minutes to prepare to argue effectively for your position

    3. Each pair meets with another pair of students who are preparing the same position. You exchange ideas and information. You will have 10 minutes to share your ideas, exchange information and refine your arguments (revised first argument).

    4. With your original partners, form new groups of four (one group of 5) that include two members supporting one position and two members supporting the opposite position
    a. Each group will present their argument. The presentation should include a series of persuasive arguments, supported by facts and prepared through research and exchange of ideas. The opposing pair listens critically and takes notes. After the first group has presented, the second group should present their position and the other group then takes notes. (reverse argument)

    5. Following the presentations, reverse positions and argue for the opposing perspective. As part of this process you are expected to build upon the previous arguments and include any additional points and facts that could lend weight to your new position. The ideas communicated orally at this stage should be incorporated into your written assignment for your reverse argument.

    6. As a group, come up with a consensus summarizing the best points made from both perspectives and detailing the facts of each side. The report should reveal a joint point of view supported by strong rationale. (consensus statement)

    7. Each group presents its report to the entire class. You will be provided transparencies and markers for this activity. Often the resulting position is a third perspective or synthesis that is more rational than the two assigned.


    Written Assignments Due Date

    1. Written first argument Tuesday June 19
    2. Revised first argument Thursday June 21
    3. Written reversed argument Thursday June 21
    4. Consensus statement Thursday June 21

    Instructions for Assignment Completion

    1. You must come to class on June 19 with the written first argument typed

    2. Develop of cover sheet for your work with the following information
    a. Your name, Class # and name, name of assignment and date
    b. Name of group members for revision of first argument
    c. Name of group members presenting the reverse argument
    d. Name of group members with whom you developed the consensus statement

    3. Thursday June 21, you must bring to class, typed and stapled together
    a. your cover sheet
    b. your first written argument
    c. revised first argument
    d. reversed argument
    e. consensus statement

    While the ideas for these three writing assignments are generated by group work, the writing must be independent and must reflect your own expression and wording of the ideas discussed in the respective groups.


    Structured Academic Controversy – Grading Rubric
    Name: ___________________________________ Semester: Summer 2007
    Criteria Unsatisfactory 0-1 Basic - 2 Proficient - 3 Distinguished - 4 Weighted Total
    Content Knowledge and critical thinking Misunderstands key concepts. Has not read the chapters on the topic. Significant errors in content, interpretation of the material. Understand key concepts but is unable to draw inferences. Information presented has some errors Has read textbook and understands key concepts and draws valid inferences. Paper includes complete information Student understands the subject matter fully and all related concepts and draws valid and insightful inferences. Paper includes complete, relevant and accurate information

    ___ * 6 = _____
    4 24
    Structure of Paper Chaotic, disorganized presentation of material Associate, digressive, elliptical, or circular presentation of ides. Arranges material in conventional order Can articulate ideas and arranges information in the best possible order for the audience

    ___ *2 = _____
    4 8

    Grammar and Mechanics Frequent use of poor grammar, sentence structure, and spelling Uses correct grammar spelling and sentence structure Uses correct grammar. Can convey ideas to others in an accurate and efficient manner Is aware of the audience and writes eloquently free of all grammar, spelling and sentence structure.

    __ * 1 = _____
    4 4

    Preparation Work appears to have been done quickly with little emphasis on quality. More interested in completing the work than learning what the assignment has to teach. Uses minimal resources from course to complete the assignment. Focused on learning the necessary material Student uses available information which enhances the quality of work and student learning Quality of work suggests personal revision and reflections. Work is of exceptional quality

    ___ * 4 = _____
    4 16


    Structured academic controversy requires students to use high level reasoning and critical thinking. At the end of this experience students will experience the following benefits:
    • Increased understanding of both sides of the controversy
    • More insight into ways to formulate an argument
    • Greater mastery and retention of material
    • Ability to generalize concepts to a wider variety of situations and contexts
    • Opportunity to reach a consensus from different points of view
    • Higher academic self-esteem
    • Higher levels of reasoning and different levels of critical thinking skills

    How the Process Works

    1. Instructional materials were given to you to support your position.

    2. You will be divided into two groups
    a. The groups will then be subdivided into pairs (one group will have 3 students).
    b. Individually at home, you will read the literature supporting your position and make notes regarding the main ideas, concepts, and arguments to support your position (written first argument)
    c. The next class, each pair develops a presentation that advocates its position. You will have 20 minutes to prepare to argue effectively for your position

    3. Each pair meets with another pair of students who are preparing the same position. You exchange ideas and information. You will have 10 minutes to share your ideas, exchange information and refine your arguments (revised first argument).

    4. With your original partners, form new groups of four (one group of 5) that include two members supporting one position and two members supporting the opposite position
    a. Each group will present their argument. The presentation should include a series of persuasive arguments, supported by facts and prepared through research and exchange of ideas. The opposing pair listens critically and takes notes. After the first group has presented, the second group should present their position and the other group then takes notes. (reverse argument)

    5. Following the presentations, reverse positions and argue for the opposing perspective. As part of this process you are expected to build upon the previous arguments and include any additional points and facts that could lend weight to your new position. The ideas communicated orally at this stage should be incorporated into your written assignment for your reverse argument.

    6. As a group, come up with a consensus summarizing the best points made from both perspectives and detailing the facts of each side. The report should reveal a joint point of view supported by strong rationale. (consensus statement)

    7. Each group presents its report to the entire class. You will be provided transparencies and markers for this activity. Often the resulting position is a third perspective or synthesis that is more rational than the two assigned.


    Written Assignments Due Date

    1. Written first argument Tuesday June 19
    2. Revised first argument Thursday June 21
    3. Written reversed argument Thursday June 21
    4. Consensus statement Thursday June 21

    Instructions for Assignment Completion

    1. You must come to class on June 19 with the written first argument typed

    2. Develop of cover sheet for your work with the following information
    a. Your name, Class # and name, name of assignment and date
    b. Name of group members for revision of first argument
    c. Name of group members presenting the reverse argument
    d. Name of group members with whom you developed the consensus statement

    3. Thursday June 21, you must bring to class, typed and stapled together
    a. your cover sheet
    b. your first written argument
    c. revised first argument
    d. reversed argument
    e. consensus statement

    While the ideas for these three writing assignments are generated by group work, the writing must be independent and must reflect your own expression and wording of the ideas discussed in the respective groups.


    Structured Academic Controversy – Grading Rubric
    Name: ___________________________________ Semester: Summer 2007
    Criteria Unsatisfactory 0-1 Basic - 2 Proficient - 3 Distinguished - 4 Weighted Total
    Content Knowledge and critical thinking Misunderstands key concepts. Has not read the chapters on the topic. Significant errors in content, interpretation of the material. Understand key concepts but is unable to draw inferences. Information presented has some errors Has read textbook and understands key concepts and draws valid inferences. Paper includes complete information Student understands the subject matter fully and all related concepts and draws valid and insightful inferences. Paper includes complete, relevant and accurate information

    ___ * 6 = _____
    4 24
    Structure of Paper Chaotic, disorganized presentation of material Associate, digressive, elliptical, or circular presentation of ides. Arranges material in conventional order Can articulate ideas and arranges information in the best possible order for the audience

    ___ *2 = _____
    4 8

    Grammar and Mechanics Frequent use of poor grammar, sentence structure, and spelling Uses correct grammar spelling and sentence structure Uses correct grammar. Can convey ideas to others in an accurate and efficient manner Is aware of the audience and writes eloquently free of all grammar, spelling and sentence structure.

    __ * 1 = _____
    4 4

    Preparation Work appears to have been done quickly with little emphasis on quality. More interested in completing the work than learning what the assignment has to teach. Uses minimal resources from course to complete the assignment. Focused on learning the necessary material Student uses available information which enhances the quality of work and student learning Quality of work suggests personal revision and reflections. Work is of exceptional quality

    ___ * 4 = _____
    4 16


    Structured academic controversy requires students to use high level reasoning and critical thinking. At the end of this experience students will experience the following benefits:
    • Increased understanding of both sides of the controversy
    • More insight into ways to formulate an argument
    • Greater mastery and retention of material
    • Ability to generalize concepts to a wider variety of situations and contexts
    • Opportunity to reach a consensus from different points of view
    • Higher academic self-esteem
    • Higher levels of reasoning and different levels of critical thinking skills

    How the Process Works

    1. Instructional materials were given to you to support your position.

    2. You will be divided into two groups
    a. The groups will then be subdivided into pairs (one group will have 3 students).
    b. Individually at home, you will read the literature supporting your position and make notes regarding the main ideas, concepts, and arguments to support your position (written first argument)
    c. The next class, each pair develops a presentation that advocates its position. You will have 20 minutes to prepare to argue effectively for your position

    3. Each pair meets with another pair of students who are preparing the same position. You exchange ideas and information. You will have 10 minutes to share your ideas, exchange information and refine your arguments (revised first argument).

    4. With your original partners, form new groups of four (one group of 5) that include two members supporting one position and two members supporting the opposite position
    a. Each group will present their argument. The presentation should include a series of persuasive arguments, supported by facts and prepared through research and exchange of ideas. The opposing pair listens critically and takes notes. After the first group has presented, the second group should present their position and the other group then takes notes. (reverse argument)

    5. Following the presentations, reverse positions and argue for the opposing perspective. As part of this process you are expected to build upon the previous arguments and include any additional points and facts that could lend weight to your new position. The ideas communicated orally at this stage should be incorporated into your written assignment for your reverse argument.

    6. As a group, come up with a consensus summarizing the best points made from both perspectives and detailing the facts of each side. The report should reveal a joint point of view supported by strong rationale. (consensus statement)

    7. Each group presents its report to the entire class. You will be provided transparencies and markers for this activity. Often the resulting position is a third perspective or synthesis that is more rational than the two assigned.


    Written Assignments Due Date

    1. Written first argument Tuesday June 19
    2. Revised first argument Thursday June 21
    3. Written reversed argument Thursday June 21
    4. Consensus statement Thursday June 21

    Instructions for Assignment Completion

    1. You must come to class on June 19 with the written first argument typed

    2. Develop of cover sheet for your work with the following information
    a. Your name, Class # and name, name of assignment and date
    b. Name of group members for revision of first argument
    c. Name of group members presenting the reverse argument
    d. Name of group members with whom you developed the consensus statement

    3. Thursday June 21, you must bring to class, typed and stapled together
    a. your cover sheet
    b. your first written argument
    c. revised first argument
    d. reversed argument
    e. consensus statement

    While the ideas for these three writing assignments are generated by group work, the writing must be independent and must reflect your own expression and wording of the ideas discussed in the respective groups.


    Structured Academic Controversy – Grading Rubric
    Name: ___________________________________ Semester: Summer 2007
    Criteria Unsatisfactory 0-1 Basic - 2 Proficient - 3 Distinguished - 4 Weighted Total
    Content Knowledge and critical thinking Misunderstands key concepts. Has not read the chapters on the topic. Significant errors in content, interpretation of the material. Understand key concepts but is unable to draw inferences. Information presented has some errors Has read textbook and understands key concepts and draws valid inferences. Paper includes complete information Student understands the subject matter fully and all related concepts and draws valid and insightful inferences. Paper includes complete, relevant and accurate information

    ___ * 6 = _____
    4 24
    Structure of Paper Chaotic, disorganized presentation of material Associate, digressive, elliptical, or circular presentation of ides. Arranges material in conventional order Can articulate ideas and arranges information in the best possible order for the audience

    ___ *2 = _____
    4 8

    Grammar and Mechanics Frequent use of poor grammar, sentence structure, and spelling Uses correct grammar spelling and sentence structure Uses correct grammar. Can convey ideas to others in an accurate and efficient manner Is aware of the audience and writes eloquently free of all grammar, spelling and sentence structure.

    __ * 1 = _____
    4 4

    Preparation Work appears to have been done quickly with little emphasis on quality. More interested in completing the work than learning what the assignment has to teach. Uses minimal resources from course to complete the assignment. Focused on learning the necessary material Student uses available information which enhances the quality of work and student learning Quality of work suggests personal revision and reflections. Work is of exceptional quality

    ___ * 4 = _____
    4 16


    “Critical Thinking Through Writing” assignment: Reflection Papers

    First Reflection:
    From class discussion, interviews, and assigned readings, reflect on the interaction among the parent, teacher, and child during the process of school-based sexuality education. Consider disparate values and needs that influence this process; discuss the influence of culture on this process; and develop rational, reasonable, and informed solutions for effective school-based sexuality education. The paper is limited to no fewer than three and no more than five pages single spaced.

    Second Reflection:
    From class discussion, interviews, and assigned readings, reflect on methods and materials you plan to integrate into your school-based sexuality education to effectively adapt information and activities for students with special needs. Present a clear expression of derived conclusions, judgements, and conclusions. The paper is limited to no fewer than three and no more than five pages single spaced.

    The Process of Reflection

    Reflection is a cognitive process that promotes self-awareness and encourages self-assessment. The cognitive process of reflecting on one’s authentic knowledge, practice, and beliefs/attitudes is important to developing professionalism. Reflection allows one to think critically about one’s ability to effectively join content knowledge with practice to reach diverse populations of learners.
    Self-reflection provides a means for practitioners to identify issues; state opinion, inferences, and predictions; and express feelings, beliefs, and attitudes. The practitioner’s responsibility in self-reflection is to support personal opinion, inference, and prediction by inclusion of relevant content knowledge presented in published works.
    By asking the following questions prior to writing self-reflection, one will more effectively integrate the inclusion of relevant content knowledge from published works:

    • How has the published work either supported or changed your authentic knowledge, attitudes, and/or beliefs? Give specific examples from the published work.
    • What trends are apparent in the published work and how do these trends either support or negate your inferences and/or predictions? Give specific examples from the published work.
    • What new knowledge or new understanding of previous knowledge have you acquired from the published work that you perceive will influence your practice? Give specific examples from the published work.
    • Where did you disagree with the author of the published work? What is your counter argument? Give specific examples from the published work.




    Rational:
    Same


    Major: Health and Physical Education
    Course Name:
    Assignment:>
    Guidelines for KH 2130 Position Papers

    1. Each position paper is worth 10 points

    2. Papers are due by the date listed on the syllabus from the time topics are handed out in class, or at another designated deadline. Hard copy Due IN CLASS. Late papers receive an automatic 5-point deduction. No exceptions.

    3. Each paper must be typed, no longer than three double-spaced pages.

    Directions:

    1. Select one of the topics from those given to you for each of the areas below.

    • Sport Position Paper - select EITHER Side A or Side B. This is the side that best reflects your personal position on that topic. Write the topic and the side you have selected at the start of your paper.

    2. Exercise Science Majors must do the Fitness Position Paper and HPE majors the PE position paper.

    • Fitness Position Paper - select EITHER Side A or Side B. This is the side that best reflects your personal position on that topic. Write the topic and the side you have selected at the start of your paper.
    • PE Position Paper – select from one of 3 options

    4. Locate at least one reference source that supports your position on this topic. See Ms. Walker if you have trouble finding a good reference. Use that reference in the text of your paper and cite it at the end. You are encouraged to use more than one reference in your paper.

    5. Make your “case” in a clear, logical, defensible manner, using your reference(s) to give “expert” support to your arguments.

    Grading Criteria:

    a. Familiarity with the issue, and coverage 4

    b. Clear statement of your position 2

    c. Selection and use of references 2

    d. Writing and grammar 2

    e. Points will be deducted for not using correct format
    (Double space, 12 font-times new roman, 3 page limit, citing references)


    KH 2130 Final Paper

    You have just been appointed Chair of a new department at Atlanta University, a large public university in Atlanta, GA. The department will include one or more areas in the allied fields of health, physical education, sport (not athletics), exercise, and recreation. The department is starting from scratch -- it presently has no faculty, students, or programs. Your first job as Chair is to write the Master Plan to guide the start-up of this new department. You have been given permission to hire 10 new faculty members to start the department. Your Master Plan should include the following parts:

    1. A departmental mission statement that reflects the area/s of emphasis it will have and the major activities to be pursued (i.e., teaching, research, community education) (3)

    2. A department name that matches the mission. You cannot use Kinesiology and Health or Health and Kinesiology (2)

    3. A list of undergraduate degrees to be offered in your department, a brief description of what students will study in each degree, and what kinds of jobs they will be qualified for when they graduate. Note: DO NOT list courses, only study areas (10)

    4. A list of faculty expertise areas needed to teach in those degrees. You can have more than one person in each area, but remember, you can hire only 10 faculty members. If you have more than one person in an area, explain how they differ (e.g., two exercise science professors: one in cardiac rehabilitation, one who does fitness education) (5)

    5. For each of the ten faculty members (30):

    a. Describe what kind of training/education he/she needs to have
    b. Describe what kind of prior experiences he/she needs to have
    c. Describe what kind of research he/she will be doing
    d. Give (make up) the title for one study he/she has published
    e. Describe at least two professional organizations he/she must be a member of


    6. MUST BE TYPED, DOUBLED SPACED. Due to Mrs. Metzler no later than Wednesday, July 25 by 10am.







    KH 2130: Position Paper Topics for Fitness


    Issue #1
    Side A:
    All teaching staff working in fitness facilities should be certified for the specific job they perform.

    Side B:
    Certification of fitness professionals is unnecessary and amounts to over-regulation by the government

    Issue #2
    Side A:
    Diet supplements should be regulated in the same way as prescription medicines.

    Side B:
    Diet supplements are not drugs, and should not be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Issue #3
    Side A:
    Access to fitness development activities is a basic right that should be available to all citizens, regardless of their level of income. That is, the government should offer “fitness insurance” for all people.

    Side B:
    Access to fitness development activities is a privilege, so people should participate only if they can afford to do so.

    Issue #4
    Side A:
    Fitness products, (videos, equipment, etc.) should be required to demonstrate that they are safe and effective (that is, they do what they say they do) before being allowed on the market.

    Side B:
    “Let the buyer beware!”

    Issue #5
    Side A:
    Being fit is a personal choice.

    Side B:
    Being fit is part of one’s social responsibility because we all “pay” for unfit people in many ways (higher insurance costs, lost productivity, etc.)




    Issue #6
    Side A:
    School PE programs should be devoted entirely to fitness development for all children.

    Side B:
    School PE programs should strive for a variety of outcomes, with fitness development among those.

    Issue #7
    Side A:
    Cosmetic fitness is a worthwhile goal for one’s fitness development.

    Side B:
    There are too many dangers in the pursuit of cosmetic fitness, so people should be strongly advised against this as a goal.

    Issue #8
    Side A:
    Steroids should be allowed for professional body builders.

    Side B:
    Steroids should not be allowed in professional body building.

    Issue #9
    Side A:
    Access to fitness development activity is fair and equitable in our society. Anyone who wants to, can be fit.

    Side B:
    Access to fitness development activity discriminates against many people, based on level of income, location, amount of education, race, gender, and physical ability.


    A:\fitness position paper


    Rational:


    Major: Kinesiology and Health
    Course Name: Fitness Program Management
    Assignment:>
    Facility Visitations

    You are to visit one type of fitness/wellness facility. For example, it can be corporate, community or other type of facility. Expect to stay at the facility for about 2-3 hours in order to complete your work. You will write a paper no shorter than 10 pages double spaced, 12 font size on the facility. Your evaluation of the facility must include the following:

    1. Flow of the front desk staff
    2. Courtesy and helpfulness of the front desk staff
    3. Health History, consent forms, medical clearance forms performed
    4. Fitness evaluations – are they a part of the procedures?
    5. Strength Training Consultations – are they a part of the procedures?
    6. Billing of membership fees – what are the options, what are the prices, are the
    prices in range with other nearby facilities? What do you pay extra for, what is
    included in the membership?
    7. Exercise Staff – qualifications, knowledge
    8. Group Exercise Instructors – qualifications, knowledge
    9. Nursery provided? Fees
    10. Children’s area provided? Fees
    11. Locker rooms – are they accessible? Are they clean and neat? Are they centrally located?
    12. Restrooms – are they handicap accessible? Are they clean and neat? Are they
    centrally located
    13. Where do children change clothes? Are they allowed in certain areas of the facility?
    14. Is the facility itself handicap accessible? If not, why.
    15. Does the exercise staff supervise the exercise floor?
    16. Is the exercise staff helpful?
    17. Is the equipment appropriate for the age and number of members? Is it handicap accessible?
    18. Is the exercise floor too crowded with equipment? Is there not enough equipment?
    19. Are there elevators in the facility?
    20. Would you join the facility? Would you want to work here?

    Options on types of facilities (see attached list):
    1. Corporate (Corporate Sports, Coca Cola, etc.)
    2. Hospital Based (DeKalb Medical, Gwinnett Medical)
    3. Community (YMCA, Gold’s, etc.)
    4. Government (CDC, US Public Health)

    You MUST attach brochures, flyers, this page and the evaluation form to your paper. Failure to do so will result in an automatic 30 point deduction. Due: July 21st, 2008.



    FITNESS PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

    EXERCISE FACILITY/PROGRAM EVALUATION

    Name of Club/Facility Evaluated:

    Date of Evaluation:

    Club/Facility/Program Location:

    General Manager: Phone:




    INFORMATION
    COMMENTS

    Length of Operation (Club Age)



    Number of Members



    Club Size (square feet)



    Club capacity (members)



    Space sufficient



    Design/layout



    Membership Fee





    Hours of Operation
    Monday - Friday
    Saturday
    Sunday



    Qualifications of Staff/Exercise Instructors - certifications, etc.



    Cardiovascular Exercise Equipment (Types and Name Brands)







    Aerobic Exercise Classes Offered







    Strength Training Equipment (Types and Name Brands)











    Rational:
    Same


    Major: Math
    Course Name: Bridge to higher Math
    Assignment:>
    1. Prove that the sum of any two odd integers is divisible by 2 but not divisible by 4.

    2. Someone claims that for any sets A, B, C,
    A-(B-C) = (A-B)-C. Give a proof or disproof.

    Rational:
    The characteristic thinking of mathematics is deductive reasoning, in which one uses logic to conclude that certain statement is true based on other statements accepted as true. A proof is a complete explanation of why the statement is true. Most assignments in Math 3000 ask students to prove or disprove mathematical claims. By completing these assignments, the students review mathematical concepts and learn how to formulate and present a proof or a counterexample.


    Major: Math
    Course Name: Senior Seminar
    Assignment:>
    1. Give a complete proof of the Intermediate Value Theorem.

    2. Use Maple or Matlab to find the eigenvalues of a 4X4 matrix.

    3. Solve a practical problem: URL
    http://www.prenhall.com/divisions/esm/app/ph-linear/kolman/html/proj2.html

    Rational:
    In Math 4991, some assigments ask for proofs (of difficult results); some assigments ask students to solve practical problems by theorems in Linear Algebra and Analysis.


    Major: Managerial Sciences
    Course Name: Optimal Resource Allocation
    Assignment:>
    SHORTER ASSIGNMENTS

    Project 1: Answer part a of Question 10 at the end of Whalen & Churchill with a complete simple cogent paragraph. Attach one 3 page printout consisting of the main page, the answer report, and the sensitivity report. Each of these three must be well laid out on a single page with appropriate choice of font size and landscape or portrait alignment. The main page must have grid lines and row/column headings.

    Project 2: Correct any errors in part a and do parts b through e of Question 10 at the end of Whalen & Churchill. Attach one 3 page printout for the original problem statement *sam as Projec 1) consisting of the main page, the answer report, and the sensitivity report. Each of these three must be well laid out on a single page with appropriate choice of font size and landscape or portrait alignment. The main page must have grid lines and row/column headings. Answer each part with a separate complete, clearly labeled paragraph. Justify your answer using only the printout for the original situation; your answer must not rely on rerunning the model. (You may rerun the model as a check, but do not include the printout or any references to it in your report!)

    Write a second draft of an executive summary addressed to the President. The summary must be correct (mathematically AND grammatically), cogent, and simple. The second draft should be two pages double spaced.

    ****************

    LONGER ASSIGNEMENT
    10) Epidemiologists at the Centers for Disease Corralling (CFDC) have identified a frightening new disease which they have named Virulence. Scattered cases are already occurring in this country. Indications point to massive new outbreaks within the next 6 months. CFDC has been motoring the situation since this new disease first came to light, and at this point several important facts are now well established: ˆ Virulence is highly contagious.
    ˆ Immunity to virulence is virtually nonexistent in this country.
    ˆ No effective treatment specific to the disease has yet been developed, but conventional treatments for the symptoms yield 91% complete remission of symptoms and 4% partial recovery with some significant disablement. The other 5% die.
    ˆ Survivors seem to be totally immune to getting the disease again.
    ˆ All types of vaccine under test have shown rather good effectiveness and almost complete absence of side effects for most of the population. Oral vaccines seem to be necessary to the safe vaccination of diabetics and certain others.
    You have been appointed by the President of the United States to take immediate charge of the immunization program in this country. Four vaccines have been given emergency type approval by the FDA as being safe and effective. However, no vaccine is perfect. In this disease, between 1% and 10% of those vaccinated do not develop immunity, but the more people are immunized the less chance those not immunized, either from not being vaccinated or from an ineffective vaccination, will be exposed and get sick. The approved vaccines, and their effective immuni¬zation rates, are:
    Vaccine Type % of those vaccinated who become immune
    I Oral, live virus 90%
    IIOral, killed virus 96%
    IIIIntramuscular, live virus 95%
    IVIntramuscular, killed virus 99% Under the President's recent Executive Order, you are being asked to effectively immunize as many people as possible. In any event, there are approximately 48 million individuals who must be vaccinated to prevent destruction of the fabric of our society. This includes individuals who are at high risk of exposure, such as police, teachers, and medical professionals. It also includes individuals otherwise critical to the continued functioning of society, such as the judiciary and virtually all politicians, major political contributors, and lawyers. Of these 48 million, at least 10 million are subject to conditions that make an oral vaccine mandatory. Many materials and processes are involved in the production of any safe and effective vaccine. Not all of these are scarce enough to limit the Virulence Program, but a few are. The process of attenuating a live virus for vaccine
    will require .3 units of the attenuating medium per dose of the oral vaccine and 1.7 units per dose of the intramuscu¬lar vaccine. 20 million units of attenuating medium can be made available in time to meet your deadline. Killed virus vaccines require a virus killing medium. .25 (i.e., 1 ) units of killing medium are needed per oral dose and 1.5
    4 units are required for each dose of intramuscular killed virus vaccine. The industry can provide up to 30 million units of virus killing medium. The processes for converting a killed or attenuated virus culture into a vaccine are complex. Due to recent industry over-expansion, those processes that are in common between oral and intramuscular vaccines are available in such generous supply that there is no possibility that they might limit the Virulence Program. Unfortunately, this is not true for the processes that are specific to either oral or intramuscular vaccines. Using a composite unit of measure of manufacturing capacity, 80 million such units can be made available for intramuscular vaccine production, of which a a dose of the killed virus vaccine requires 3 and the live (attenuated) virus vaccine requires 2. Only 6 million composite oral vaccine manufacturing units are available to the program, but oral vaccines only require .3 units per dose of live virus vaccine and only .32 units per dose of the killed virus vaccine. The industry is cooperating fully, but they require direction and coordination. Specifically, they need you to tell them how many doses of each vaccine they should produce in order to meet the country's needs. Once they know that, they can proceed to implement the vaccine manufacturing program. The President is also interested. Based on available resources, what will you and the industry be able to accomplish?
    Formulate this situation as an LP problem and solve it using EXCEL.
    74
    Answer each of the following with a complete, clearly labeled paragraph. Justify your answer using only the printout for the original situation; you answer must not rely on rerunning the model. (You may rerun the model as a check, but do not include the printout or any references to it in your report!)
    Do not carry over the changes from one question to another; for example answer part c assuming you do have to provide 10 million oral vaccinations, answer part d assuming you do have to provide 10 million oral vaccinations and you get no help from Canada.
    a) How many immunities cad be produced? How many units of each kind of vaccine need to be made to achieve this?
    b) How many immunities could be produced if you didn't have to meet the constraint of 10 million oral vaccinations? How many units of each kind of vaccine need to be made to achieve this?
    c) Canada has offered to supply the US with 100,000 units of any of the four key raw materials (Attenuat¬ing medium, killing medium, oral composite, intramuscular composite). However, because of the very long and expensive process of certifying pharmaceuticals coming from foreign countries, we can only accept one of the four materials. Which offer of 100,000 units should CFDC accept? How many total immunities will the new situation enable the U.S. to produce?
    d) How many immunities could be produced if you didn't have to meet the constraint of 48 million vacci¬nations?
    e) Give a brief description of what would happen if the efficiency of the Oral Live vaccine could be raised from 90% to 91%. Give an even briefer description of what would happen if, instead, the efficiency of the Oral Live vaccine could be raised from 90% to 92%.
    f) Treat 48 million vaccinations as one goal and the number of immunities from (d) as another goal. Give shortfalls from either goal the same weight of 1. What solution minimizes the weighted sum of shortfalls?
    g) Membership in the fuzzy set of politically bad outcomes = shortfall from goal 1 divided by 48 million. Membership in the fuzzy set of medically bad outcomes = shortfall from goal 2 divided by the answer to (d). Membership in the fuzzy set of bad outcomes = membership in the set of politically bad outcomes or membership in the set of medically bad outcomes, whichever is more. What solution minimizes membership in the fuzzy set of bad outcomes?
    75


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Managerial Sciences
    Course Name: LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF HRM
    Assignment:>
    MGS 4320
    Examples of Short Assignments
    (To be written at the start of classes nine times during the semester)

    1. Henry Blackfox, Cherokee Native American and GSU graduate with a degree is finance, applied for the job of branch manager at a local bank in Atlanta. His parents and grandparents were born and raised in north Georgia so he was very excited about working near his family. Although he was the most qualified, the bank said that the job was his only if he agreed to change his current hair style (decorative braids traditionally worn by his ancestors) to one more “conservative.” He refused and filed suit charging the bank with illegal discrimination based on race, sex, and national origin discrimination.

    ? Under what circumstances does he have a case? Why?



    2. While fighting a fire, a Gwinnett county firefighter suffered a serious fall when a floor gave way. He developed epilepsy because of trauma to the brain. He became despondent upon learning that he could never again work as a firefighter. As his seizures and terrible headaches became more frequent and nearly six months after the accident he attempted suicide. His suicide attempt triggered a stroke which caused substantial paralysis on his left side.

    Is it likely that his stroke is covered by workers compensation? Explain.



    3. A video camera aimed at the loading dock of Packages R Us (PRU), where packages are loaded onto trucks for delivery, records Phillip Murray, a line employee, stealing laptop computers being shipped from the computer manufacturer to customers. Based on the tape, factory officials searched Murray’s locker and found two stolen laptops. Murray was fired immediately.
    Does Murray have grounds for a lawsuit, especially since employees were not told of the cameras? Explain.


    4. Jeff Ryan, a software engineer, worked for Lockheed Missiles and Space Company in Sunnyvale, California. Ryan received “Excellent” ratings for 10 years. In 2001, he got a new manager, Albert Parisi, who against the advice of Human Resources, changed Ryan’s job duties and re-ranked Ryan from second best from the top to second worst among 49 employees. Lockheed used a relative rating system that required managers rank subordinates from best to worst based on ratings determined by the graphic rating scale shown below. Ryan received “Poor” ratings in every category. The new manager also re-ranked other African-American employees lower. Eventually, Ryan and other African-Americans sued Lockheed for race discrimination.

    Explain why the current system led to Lockheed’s legal troubles. Explain the weaknesses of the current system.

    ******************

    MGS 4320
    On-Line Scenario Write-up Example
    Nidds, a 59-year-old white male, had been a gaming dealer at a Las Vegas casino for 35 years. In 1989, he was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in his knees and feet. Nidds’ physician prescribed various anti-inflammatory drugs. However, over the past five years, he found it increasingly difficult to stand during dealing shifts. In January 2003, he requested one of the following accommodations:

    • Sit while dealing
    • Deal at the table for disabled players, where dealers sit.
    • Take a lower stress shift (the day shift was not as busy as Nidds’ current evening shift)
    His supervisor refused his request, stating that Nidds was just “burned out after 35 years on the job.” Over the next six months, Nidds was unable to complete his shift on four occasions because of severe pain in his knees and feet. On July 18, 2002, Nidds was fired for poor performance. Nidds has sued the casino for discrimination based on age, sex, and disability and has charged the company with violating the Family and Medical Leave Act.


    Facts:
    • The casino has 500 employees.
    • Nidds received excellent performance ratings until 2003.
    • Based on the assumption that standing looks more “professional and energetic,” the casino requires that all dealers stand.
    • Because many dealers want to sit. The casino said granting Nidds’ request would “set a bad precedent” and require that everyone be allowed to sit.
    • The casino reserved the day shift for less experienced dealers because the pace was slower.
    • Many dealers asked to work the day shift, especially women with young children. The casino said that making an exception for Nidds, a very experienced dealer, would “create an uproar among the women.”
    • The average age of the casino’s dealers is 32 years.
    • Nidds is the oldest dealer in the company.

    Gaming supervisors oversee the gaming operations and personnel in an assigned area. They circulate among the tables and observe the operations to ensure that all of the stations and games are covered for each shift. It also is not uncommon for gaming supervisors to explain and interpret the operating rules of the house to the patrons who may have difficulty understanding the rules. Gaming supervisors also may plan and organize activities to create a friendly atmosphere for the guests staying in their hotels or casino hotels; and, periodically, they address and adjust service complaints.

    Gaming dealers operate table games such as craps, blackjack, and roulette. Standing or sitting behind the table, dealers provide dice, dispense cards to players, or run the equipment. Some dealers also monitor the patrons for infractions of casino rules. Gaming dealers must be skilled in customer service and in executing their game. Dealers determine winners, calculate and pay winning bets, and collect losing bets. Because of the fast-paced work environment, most gaming dealers are competent in at least two games, usually blackjack and craps.

    Does Nidds have grounds for a lawsuit based on the information provided? In answering this question be sure to identify the critical facts, the laws and regulations that should be used in deciding whether a case could exist, and how, based on the analysis of those items, you reached your conclusion.
    This is to be prepared in a Business Memo format of three pages.



    Rational:


    Major: Managerial Sciences
    Course Name: Small Business Management
    Assignment:>
    MGS 4560

    Spring 2010

    Individual case Write-up Assignment



    Assignment Background



    In this class each student will be responsible for an individual case analysis. This assignment will require the student to use the tools developed in this course and in other prerequisite course and to apply critical thinking skills in making a recommendation for action based on the facts presented in a large case study. This exercise will be graded on two sets of skills and will be turned in for scoring both as a draft and as a final exercise. Each of the two sets of component skills will be weighed equally in evaluating both the draft and the final paper. It will quickly be determined that these two sets of skills are tightly interwoven. As pointed out in the syllabus, an entrepreneur wishing to effective interact with a wide range of external parties on which the firm is dependent will need to incorporate both systematic problem solving and effective communications.




    The first set of skills to be scored will capture the ability of the student to correctly apply concepts and material from this class and from the prerequisite classes in addressing the problem and determining the solution. Students will need to show that they have command of the concepts used, know when and how to apply them, and how to interpret for a small business the output of the analysis or application. Students will be introduced to many concepts over the course of the semester and some of these will be developed in later classes, such as sources of financing. Thus, some of these tools will not be developed prior to the due date for the initial draft. The draft, therefore, will be graded on the materials presented up to the week before it is due. The final paper will assume that all the material except that discussed on the week the final version is du will be incorporated.




    The second set of skills to be scored will capture the ability of the student to use critical thinking skills in addressing the case problem and writing skills to effectively communicate their analysis and conclusions. Critical thinking skills for managers in business today are defined by the Department of Managerial Sciences as:
    Critical thinking is an intellectually disciplined process that has three main components. First is skillfully and broadly gathering or generating data. Second is analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating the information in that data through the use of systematic, logical reasoning processes and the applications of relevant decision assisting tools developed ex ante. And third is the ability to reach conclusions and make recommendations for action that are logical, supported by evidence, and devoid of pre-existing individual bias or preference.

    Through effective writing, students will be expected to exhibit of these steps in their decision process. Students will receive separate feedback on their drafts highlighting the strengths and weakness of their critical thinking through writing skills and providing guidance on how to improve the effectives of these skills. The rubric used in this evaluation is posted on the class SharePoint sight so that students can see the standards to be applied and can ask questions about concepts that are unclear.




    Assignment Questions



    The case for this semester is Pro Clean, Tennessee. The entrepreneur in this small business, Kevin Wilson, has developed a good, small firm, but when trying to expand the business Kevin has run into many problems that threaten to destroy his firm. In your case write up you will want to do the following:




    • Identify and Prioritize the four or five biggest challenges PCT faces at this time.

    • Set out an Action Agenda, including a timetable for the action, the Kevin can use to address these challenges.




    In addressing these points you will want to systematically proceed through a critical thinking process moving from fact collection, through an analysis and comparison of alternatives, to a recommended solution. By now you have seen the critical thinking approach in many contexts, but it is important to always keep in mind that this means that you have to anticipate and answer the “why” question for what you are concluding in each part, and you have to address the “how” question when looking at actions you are recommending.




    Reminders



    All papers, both draft and final, are due at the start of class on the due dates listed in the syllabus. There are no exceptions. Please bring a hard copy to class and send an e-copy as well. If you are absent you will still be responsible for getting an e-version of the draft or final analysis into my GSU e-mailbox by start of class. Papers that are late will be docked one third of a letter grade for every 24 hours or part thereof that they are late. E.g. a paper that is two and one-half days late will be docked a full letter grade. You will still receive all of your feedback and assessment of both your paper’s content and your critical thinking through writing skills that will be make by the same standard as any other paper, however the return of your paper may be delayed.




    All work is to be done by you and you alone. Use of on-line case write-ups or similar services are well known and will result in a grade of “F” for the paper as well as referral to the Department for disciplinary actions consistent with the Code of Conduct. Please note all of the statements on academic Honest in the syllabus and in the student catalog and handbook. These standards for individual work and for the correct and full citation of sources used in your work will be enforced. As entrepreneurs you will want credit for your work; and when others rely on your work you will want full credit for your intellectual property. You are expected to exhibit these values in all of your work in this class.



    Rational:
    This assignment will be effective because it will require the student to use the tools developed in this course and in other prerequisite courses and to apply critical thinking skills in making a written recommendation for action based on the facts presented in a large case study. This exercise will be graded on two sets of skills and will be turned in for scoring both as a draft and as a final exercise. These two sets of skills are tightly interwoven. As pointed out in the syllabus, an entrepreneur wishing to effective interact with a wide range of external parties on which the firm is dependent will need to incorporate both systematic problem solving and effective communications.


    Major: Managerial Sciences
    Course Name: Service Operations Management
    Assignment:>
    MGS 4770
    Homework Assignments


    Chapter 2: PC Repair: Develop a business strategy (p. 30), as well as, state the Target Market, Service Concept and discuss the Service Delivery System. Include “Capacity Strategies” that will support the service delivery system. Download the outline provided under “Assignments” at WebCT Vista for Chapter 2. Limit to 3 to 4 pages. This homework represents one of your key assignments for the course. Please type your homework. This assignment will be returned to you with CTW feedback. You will re-write this assignment and turn it back in one week later.


    Critical Thinking through Writing
    Final Exam Paper
    MGS 4770

    You are developing a strategic service vision to take to your primary bank in order to obtain a proposed $1million loan to begin a new sole proprietorship business in the third quarter of 2008. You are writing your own business plan based on what you have learned in MGS 4770, Service Operations Management, as well as, other business core courses. The major components of your plan are spelled out at ULearn. You have been told that the plan should be comprehensive, typed for submission to the bank and should be a full twelve pages minimum (double spaced, 12 font, with cover page) to ensure all topics are covered adequately. Each page should be numbered. The business plan is due on or before Tuesday, April 22, 2008 by 12:00 Noon (no electronic copies accepted…hand delivered to my office). You understand that the bank will not accept the write-up if it is not submitted on time. Business Plans must deal with specifics and not be concerned with the description of basic terms. No definitions or explanation of the strategic service vision terms are necessary. The bank management understands what you are trying to do. Deal with specifics regarding the details of your plan! You should identify each major topic in your paper as reflected in the outline provided for the paper. Your executive summary will be two pages of the twelve pages and will be due initially on Tuesday, February 12, 2008. This assignment will be returned to you with CTW feedback. You will re-write executive summary and turn it back in one week later.
    The intent of this paper is to demonstrate your ability to organize, develop and advance a service operation business plan vision using critical thinking through writing at a functional business level, as opposed to an academic level. You will be satisfying Student Learning Outcome #7, as stated on page 2 of this syllabus. You will be asked to share the development of your work, periodically during the course of the semester to ensure the advancement of the vision and the sophistication of the content of the paper. One important aspect is that of being able to communicate upward.



    Rational:
    The followingis the rationale for the assignments in all four of the tracks for MGS majors: For CT assignments there should be a very tight link between the application of critical thinking skills set out in the University policy and the application of subject matter concepts. The assignments should therefore be practice-oriented situations that involve the students having to identify relevant facts from a rich situation, rationally analyze the identified facts by systematically applying tools developed in the disciple, and reach logical conclusions based on that analysis. These elements need to be presented clearly in prose writing, preferably in the style and format of a standard business memorandum using skills developed in Business Communications (BCOM 3950)


    Major: Marketing
    Course Name: Marketing Problems
    Assignment:>
    Assignments 1-5

    The students are assigned a 10-12 page case to read and analyze.

    They are to prepare their analysis based on a template and a corresponding rubric.

    Students will prepare a set of case notes in which they prepare a 1. Situation Analysis broken down into a. Industry Facts and Analysis b. Company Facts and Analysis C. Relevant Trends. 2. The Problem Statement. 3. The Alternatives and for each relevant alternative a comprehensive list of the advantages and disadvantages. 4. A Recommendation which specifies which alternative they believe the company should choose and the rationale for their choice. 5. Appendices to include at a minimum a. Quantitative Analysis and b. Qualitative Analysis.

    The assignments change in that each case is different. The template and rubric remain the same.

    Students use the written assignments to be better prepared for the case discussions which represent about 50% of the course. The process of preparing the case notes assignments requires that the students analyze the cases at higher level than they might otherwise because the assignments may be taken up at random. A total of five will be taken up during the semester.

    The process of writing the case notes will also assist students, most of whom have little if any experience with case analysis, grow more comfortable with the pedagogy.

    Finally, preparing the case notes helps ready the students for the midterm examination which is also a case they must analyze and submit.





    Rational:
    The students are asked to not only make a decision among a group of possible alternatives, all of which appear to be plausible, but they must be able to defend their choice.

    In order to defend their choice the student must have analyzed the case carefully in terms of both quantitative and qualitative dimensions. They must be conversant with not only the option they select but the other alternatives as well. They need to be able to argue for their course of action as well as being able to argue against other possible alternatives. Ideally this results in a forum in which the alternatives are debated in class. Students advocate their recommended choice and argue against others they have rejected.

    The case analysis process demands that students make assumptions. If they are to choose a price for a product, typically, they must identify the price to charge. The must deal with ambiguity.

    The case method demands that students carefully identify the problem that the decision-maker in the case must address because if they misspecify the problem, the alternative courses of action and the recommendation will likely be off-base.

    The process of case analysis asks students to impose structure on ambiguous, complex problems. It does this by breaking the process of case analysis down into a set of steps: 1. situation analysis 2. problem definition, 3. alternatives and their advantages and disadvantages, and 4. recommendation. The written assignments of preparing case notes based on this typology focuses the students on the components of a business decision.


    Major: Music
    Course Name: Music from 1750 (CTW)
    Assignment:>
    1 Seven to ten page critical thinking fieldwork project paper/presentation. EACH PERSON ENROLLED IN MUS4810 MUST SUBMIT A PAPER TO BE ELIGIBLE TO PASS THE COURSE. This research paper should be based on fieldwork conducted on some aspect of music discussed in class or on the music of a culture of your choice, with the instructor’s approval. The “Critical Thinking through Writing” component of the research paper will be graded on a rubric that will be provided to each student.

    The “Critical Thinking through Writing” component of the Revised (or final) Research Paper will be graded on a rubric. The rubric is composed of eight components, each of which has been identified as significant to critical thinking for this assignment. These components are (1) Central position and primary objective, (2) Methodology, concepts, and theories of inquiry, (3) Organization of data, (4) Context of data and scholarly support, (5) Analysis of data, (6) Personal findings with scholarly support, (7) Relevance and implications in concluding thoughts, and (8) Writing style and quality of communication. Up to four (4) points can be earned in each of the eight sections. A maximum of one hundred points (100) can be earned for the revised critical thinking research paper.

    Each student enrolled in MUS 4810 will be evaluated on the following material:

    (1) The proposal for a research paper, an outline for the paper, and an annotated bibliography,
    (2) A draft of the 7 to 10-page research paper including. The draft must include a list of at least 6 interview questions and a one-page transcription of highlights of the word-for-word interview or a synopsis of the interview
    (3) The revised draft of the research paper.
    Students must make the recommended changes to the graded Research Proposal Draft that will be returned to them. Next, students should revise the draft and amend it to reflect a development, analysis, and application of the subject matter that demonstrates the use of “critical thinking.”

    I suggest student approach this critical thinking through writing assignment in the following ways:

    1) Present and explain your central position and the original primary objective/aim of your paper.
    2) Use methods, concepts, or theories in historical musicology or ethnomusicology that are applicable to the topic and content of your paper.
    3) Organize the paper to show a logical and sequential layout of the cultural and historical information and the data that supports your central position or claim.
    4) Present the topic in its appropriate cultural and/or historical context with proper citations of scholarly sources.
    5) Provide an analysis of the music, song text, and historical or cultural information about the topic including excerpts of interviews with musicians, if appropriate. Also include evidence of analysis of data related to comparative research studies. Analysis should include musical transcriptions when appropriate.
    6) Include personal findings and scholarly interpretations related to cultural and/or historical research, with proper citations, to support your central position.
    7) In the concluding thoughts expound on the significance and relevance of the topic and include thought-provoking ideas and questions for future study.
    8) Be sure that the writing style demonstrates the correct use of terms and concepts introduced in the class and that the style of writing is professional and for the appropriate audience of readers.

    There should be a minimum of 10 reference sources. The paper must be presented orally in class. Required style format: Chicago. This assignment must include a fieldwork component.

    Suggested format:
    Title
    Thesis and central position or claim
    Central Aim
    Supporting Objectives
    Methodology
    Historical and Cultural background
    Evidence to support central position or claim:
    A synthesis of scholarly research, personal research, interviews, and musical analysis or transcriptions.
    Concluding thoughts and implications for future study.



    Rational:
    This course provides the student with basic knowledge of musicological terms used to describe various styles and traditions of Western European art music as well as the art music of the Americas derived from these styles and traditions. Critical Thinking through Writing (CTW) about music involves written interpretation and evaluation of the knowledge, the performance, and the creative, technical and instructional skills associated with music. For the purpose of critical thinking such skills are needed to identify, analyze and evaluate arguments and claims about music. Because this course has been identified as one of two critical thinking through writing courses in music it includes a three part assignment—(1) a proposal for a research paper, an outline for the paper, and an annotated bibliography, (2) a draft of the 7 to 10-page research paper, and (3) the revised draft of the research paper—that has been designed to assess students critical thinking. This assignment is the primary method through which critical thinking through writing about music will be evaluated and assessed. As such it is the School of Music’s means of complying with the Quality Enhancement Plan of Georgia State University. The School of Music contents that critical thinking through writing about music involves the written interpretation, from an interdisciplinary perspective, of the ways a given culture expresses itself through music by examining its meaning and value in terms of cultural and historical influences on musical styles, traditions, genres, and performance practices.


    Major: Music
    Course Name: WORLD MUSIC (CTW)
    Assignment:>
    Critical Thinking Revised Research Paper Rubric
    MUS 4820 – World Music

    This CTW assignment must be based on fieldwork conducted on some aspect of music discussed in class or on the music of a culture of your choice, with the instructor’s approval.

    The “Critical Thinking through Writing” component of the Revised (or final) Research Paper will be graded on a rubric. The rubric is composed of eight components, each of which has been identified as significant to critical thinking for this assignment. These components are (1) Central position and primary objective, (2) Methodology, concepts, and theories of inquiry, (3) Organization of data, (4) Context of data and scholarly support, (5) Analysis of data, (6) Personal findings with scholarly support, (7) Relevance and implications in concluding thoughts, and (8) Writing style and quality of communication.

    Each student enrolled in MUS 4820 will be evaluated on the following material:

    (1) The proposal for a research paper, an outline for the paper, and an annotated bibliography,
    (2) A draft of the 7 to 10-page research paper including. The draft must include a list of to 6 interview questions and a one-page word-for-word transcription of the highlights of the interview.
    (3) The revised draft of the research paper.
    Students must make the recommended changes to the graded Research Proposal Draft that will be returned to them. Next, students should revise the draft and amend it to reflect a development, analysis, and application of the subject matter that demonstrates the use of “critical thinking.”

    A total of 32 points (8 points in each category) out of 100 can be earned for the critical thinking component of the assignment.

    I suggest student approach this critical thinking through writing assignment in the following ways:

    1) Present and explain your central position and the original primary objective/aim of your paper.
    2) Utilize methods, concepts, or theories in historical musicology or ethnomusicology that are applicable to the topic and content of your paper.
    3) Organize the paper to show a logical and sequential layout of the cultural and historical information and the data that supports your central position or claim.
    4) Present the topic in its appropriate cultural and/or historical context with proper citations of scholarly sources.
    5) Provide an analysis of the music, song text, and historical or cultural information about the topic including excerpts of interviews with musicians, if appropriate. Also include evidence of analysis of data related to comparative research studies. Analysis should include musical transcriptions when appropriate.
    6) Include personal findings and scholarly interpretations related to cultural and/or historical research, with proper citations, to support your central position.
    7) The concluding thoughts expound on the significance and relevance of the topic and include thought-provoking ideas and questions for future study.
    8) Be sure that the writing style demonstrates the correct use of terms and concepts introduced in the class and that the style of writing is professional and for the appropriate audience of readers.


    There should be a minimum of 10 reference sources. The paper must be presented orally in class. Required style format: Chicago. This assignment must include a fieldwork component.

    Suggested format:
    Title
    Thesis and central position or claim
    Central Aim
    Supporting Objectives
    Methodology
    Historical and Cultural background
    Evidence to support central position or claim:
    A synthesis of scholarly research, personal research, interviews, and musical analysis or transcriptions.
    Concluding thoughts and implications for future study



    Rational:
    This course provides the student with basic knowledge of the following: (1) musicological and ethnomusicological terms used to describe non-Western European music; and (2) the use and function of music and related forms of artistic expression of the specific regions, countries, and cultures. Because this course has been identified as one of two critical thinking through writing courses in music it includes a three part assignment—(1) a proposal for a research paper, an outline for the paper, and an annotated bibliography, (2) a draft of the 7 to 10-page research paper, and (3) the revised draft of the research paper—that has been designed to assess students critical thinking. This assignment is the primary method through which critical thinking through writing about music will be evaluated and assessed. As such it is the School of Music’s means of complying with the Quality Enhancement Plan of Georgia State University. The School of Music contents that critical thinking through writing about music involves the written interpretation, from an interdisciplinary perspective, of the ways a given culture expresses itself through music by examining its meaning and value in terms of cultural and historical influences on musical styles, traditions, genres, and performance practices.


    Major: Nursing
    Course Name: Basic Concepts in Nursing Care
    Assignment:>
    The CTW activity will focus on a clinical patient that is assigned in NURS 2160. The activity will entail six writing assignments that will reflect the student’s ability to critically think. With each activity, there are opportunities for students to receive feedback from a Graduate Teaching Assistant working as a writing consultant. The goal of all feedback will be to enhance students’ ability to express their viewpoints in writing and to demonstrate in-depth critical thinking.

    Critical Thinking will be assessed by the Written Clinical Narrative. Each student will be given the opportunity to complete one narrative during each week of clinical in NURS 2160. Critical Thinking will be measured by utilizing the Critical Thinking in Patient Care Rubric.

    The Written Clinical Narrative will include the following:
    Reflect on your clinical experience with your assigned patient this week. Answer the following questions:
    1. Why was the patient admitted to the hospital; List their primary problems.
    2. Why do you think these problems were occurring?
    3. Write the assessment that you performed on this patient; What other assessment data (i.e. nurses notes, H&P, MD progress notes, lab values, diagnostic tests) suggests these problems exist?
    4. What nursing interventions did you perform and why?
    5. What conclusions can you make regarding the patient’s condition and what alternatives to treatment exist for the patient?


    Rational:
    There are five opportunities to write and engage in the critically thinking process. This process allows the student to reflect on and analyze their thoughts, actions and interventions on their assigned patient.


    Major: Nursing
    Course Name: Leadership & Management in Nursing
    Assignment:>
    IV. Critical Thinking Leadership Paper (35%)
    Overview

    The purpose of this assignment is to give students an opportunity to analyze
    leadership, developing their own definitions and descriptions of leadership, and to
    analyze their own potential as evolving nurse leaders. Analyzing concepts related to
    leadership and management and then sharing knowledge from that analysis is a crucial
    contribution to nursing. Furthermore, written communication is an ever increasing
    important leadership and management skill. To this end, students will develop a paper
    that will allow them to communicate an analysis of the values and actions of individuals
    who currently are or have been recognized as leaders (guide provided by Grossman,2000) and to share their own conclusions about leadership. The process for developing the leadership paper is as follows:
    1. Students will conduct a review of the literature that describes or defines
    leaders or leadership. Literature related to power and influence, change
    and transition, creativity, credibility and trustworthiness, image, leadership
    styles, leader-follower interactions, conflict management, vision or goal
    development, motivating others, team building, serving as a role model,
    representation of groups, renewing self and others, are some examples of
    literature students may select to review. From this review, students should
    critique the descriptions/definitions of leadership in terms of their
    usefulness. As a result of this critical analysis, students should offer their
    definitions and descriptions of leaders and their leadership and justify
    those definitions and descriptions.
    2. Each student will select a contemporary or historical figure outside the
    profession of nursing who is thought to be a leader. After reading works
    by or about this leader (and interviewing the leader if possible), the
    student will write an analysis of that individual as a leader, using all
    elements of the definition/description of leaders and leadership that the
    student developed. Look at their styles, the ways they interact(ed) with
    others, the nature of the situations in which they ¡§rose above the crowd,¡¨
    and the ways in which they use(d) power. Develop an understanding of
    why these individuals are considered leaders and how they have been able
    to influence others in achieving goals. Evidence should be provided from
    sources by or about the leader to support the student¡¦s conclusions about
    that person¡¦s leadership. Selection of individual for analysis is to be
    submitted to faculty for approval by no later than September 11, 2007.
    3. Each student should select a person in contemporary nursing whom the
    student considers a leader and conduct a similar analysis of that individual.
    Again, references by or about the selected nurse leader as well as data
    gathered through a review of the leader¡¦s curriculum vitae or an interview
    (if possible) should be used as the basis of the analysis. Such data should
    be incorporated into the paper to support the student¡¦s conclusions about
    the nurse leader¡¦s leadership. Selection of individual for analysis is to
    be submitted to faculty for approval by no later than September 11, 2007.
    4. After thoroughly analyzing the selected nurse and non-nurse leaders, the
    student will compare the two individuals as leaders. Conclusions about
    their effectiveness as leaders should be made and justified.
    5. Finally, students will critically analyze themselves as potential leaders in
    nursing. Using the conclusions that were made about the leadership
    effectiveness of the selected leaders, students are to (1) examine their own
    strengths to exert effective leadership in the way the selected leaders did,
    (2) identify areas that need to be developed to assume an effective
    leadership role, and (3) formulate specific strategies to strengthen their
    leadership assets as well as to address their perceived limitations as a
    leader.

    Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting the Critical Thinking Leadership Paper

    1. All manuscripts should be prepared in Microsoft Word, doubled spaced, and
    formatted according to the APA Publication Manual.
    2. Papers should be no more than 2,000 words.
    3. Number all pages of the paper except for the cover sheet.
    4. For draft paper, one paper copy is to be submitted to the peer reviewer and two
    paper copies of the draft paper along with an electronic copy are to be submitted
    (the electronic copy should be submitted as an attached file saved in Rich Text
    Format to an email to skillian@gsu.edu).
    5. For final paper, two paper copies of the final paper along with an electronic copy are to
    be submitted (the electronic copy should be submitted as an attached file saved in Rich Text Format to an email to skillian@gsu.edu).
    6. Pages of paper are to be stapled together but not placed in binders or report covers.
    7. Primary headings for the paper are to be as follows: (1) Introduction [a brief
    paragraph introducing the contents of the paper], (2) Description of Leadership,
    (3) Analysis of Non-Nurse Leader, (4) Analysis of Nurse Leader, (5) Comparison
    of Leaders, (6) Self-Analysis of Leadership Potential, (6) Summary, and (7)
    References [references are not included in the word count].
    „X The introduction succinctly and adequately describes the content of the paper. The reader has a clear idea of what is to follow in the narrative.
    „X The summary provides conclusions about what was discussed not simply a reiteration of content.
    „X All references are cited and appropriate; no evidence of plagiarism. At
    least five references, other than the classroom textbook, are used.
    8. Students will prepare an initial draft of their papers to be reviewed by a peer
    reviewer, the course writing consultant, and faculty. Guidelines for peer
    reviewers are described below. Drafts, along with final papers, will be considered
    in the grading of this assignment. If drafts are submitted after the due date and
    time, 30 points will be deleted from the final paper grade.
    9. Maintain a copy of all documents submitted to faculty, peers, and writing
    consultant.

    Grading Criteria

    Grading Criteria are used to evaluate and assign a grade to the paper. Criteria are
    also used to give feedback on the draft by peer reviewers, faculty, and writing consultant.
    If there is uncertainty over a grade for the final paper project, the faculty may ask for a
    review of the draft and final paper by a second faculty member who is unaware of what
    grade is being considered.

    Overall (Accounts for 15% of the total grade for the paper):
    1. Scholarship. Student offers: (1) valid, complete, and compelling warrants for all assertions; (2) shows an understanding of the subject matter fully; (3) offers
    complete, relevant, and accurate details; (4) cites sources correctly and
    effectively, making clear distinctions between the writer¡¦s ideas and sources; (5)
    researches everything relevant to the subject, (6) provides an original
    contribution to the subject; and (7) the language clearly communicates the
    author¡¦s intention, that is, ideas throughout the paper are developed logically and
    succinctly; paper is a scholarly product and reflects proper format (e.g.,
    grammatically correct without misspelled words and typographical errors and
    guidelines are followed).
    2. Draft Paper. Draft follows the guidelines for the paper. Draft is taken seriously
    by the student; there is evidence of ¡§doing one¡¦s best¡¨ rather than simply putting
    something down on paper to garner feedback. If the quality of the draft is
    considered extraordinarily poor by the faculty and/or writing consultant, the draft
    will be returned to the student author with instructions for remediation and
    resubmission. If this occurs, the draft will be considered as being submitted late
    and will earn the 30 point penalty for late submission.

    Cover Sheet (not included in word count)
    a. Title
    b. Name of Student
    c. Course Number and Title
    d. Date Submitted
    e. Consultant(s) (if used)

    Table of Contents (not included in word count)

    Section 1: Description of Leadership. The review of literature is thorough, critical,
    and comprehensive. The critiques of published definitions and descriptions of leaders
    and leadership were thoughtful and relevant. Clearly states and provides a sound
    justification of one¡¦s proposed definition and descriptions of leadership and leaders. The
    developed definitions and descriptions of leaders and leadership used to guide analysis of
    selected leaders are articulated clearly and reflect attention to the limitation noted in
    existing definitions and descriptions. This section accounts for 20 points of the total
    grade for the manuscript.

    Section 2: Non-Nursing Leader. The analysis of the leader is thorough and clearly
    articulated. The analysis was done in relation to the developed definitions and
    descriptions of leaders and leadership. Evidence is provided to support conclusions about
    the leader¡¦s leadership. This section accounts for 20 points of the total grade for the
    manuscript.

    Section 3: Nurse Leader. The analysis of the leader is thorough and clearly articulated.
    The analysis was done in relation to the developed definitions and descriptions of leaders
    and leadership. Evidence is provided to support conclusions about the leader¡¦s
    leadership. This section accounts for 20 points of the total grade for the manuscript.

    Section 4: Comparison of Leaders. The comparison: (1) evolves from the data
    provided in the analysis, (2) is objective, (3) is comprehensive, and (4) clearly articulates
    the two individual¡¦s similarities and differences as leaders. Conclusions about the
    effectiveness of the two individuals as leaders are valid in light of the analyses and
    comparisons provided. This section accounts for 15 points of the total grade for the
    manuscript.

    Section 5: Self-Analysis. The self-analysis: (1) is critical, (2) examines personal
    strengths necessary to exert effective leadership, (3) identifies areas that need
    development, and (4) proposes specific strategies to strengthen personal leadership assets.
    Shows evidence of critical reflection of one¡¦s leadership potential. This section
    accounts for 10 points of the total grade for the manuscript.

    References (not included in word count)


    Rational:
    There are additional opportunities to write and revise each the Critical Thinking Leadership paper assignment. This process allows the student to reflect on and analyze their thoughts on the assigned topic.


    Major: Nutrition
    Course Name: Introduction to Research
    Assignment:>
    NTR 3010: Annotation writing assignment
    In-class Assignment (Week 8)

    Annotation is similar to abstract without the structure. It is concise, evaluative summary of each source (article). Depending on your assignment, an annotation may be one stage in a larger research project, or it may be an independent project standing on its own. Annotation should be written in your own words (150 words)
    What an annotation should include:
    • Complete Citation.
    • Information to explain the authority and/or qualifications of the author. For example: Dr. William Smith, a Nutrition professor at XYZ University investigated……..
    • Scope (context of the research) and main purpose of the work or research question to be answered
    • Main findings of the study
    • Any biases that you detect related to methodology and results and Conflict of interest
    • Evaluation as it relates to dietetic practice, future direction of research, future recommendations, or suitability for your research project
    Evaluation:
    Your abstract will be evaluated on Completeness, Correctness, Clarity, and Communication. Grading will be based on the Rubric given on Page 9

    NTR 3010: Description of Group Research Assignment

    Three students per group will work on the class project. The following are various steps involved in completion of the class project (100 points).

    Formulation of research question and needs assessment: First step in research project is to select the research topic and state the question to be researched. Justify the need for this research (Why you are doing this project/research?). Come up with a clearly defined research question.

    Literature search: Finding this information requires skills, such as using search tools and evaluating the information that you find for authority, currency, and accessibility. First step in literature search is to develop appropriate “search words” (key words). Use these key words in Medline or PubMed search engines to collect the literature on a selected topic. First, try to find some general review articles, read, and understand the topic. Start collecting articles as soon as possible. GSU library may not carry all journals. In case you want to obtain a journal article that is not available in the GSU library, you can obtain them using the interlibrary loan. It takes about 1-2 weeks to obtain articles through interlibrary loan. You must collect at least 10 peer-reviewed original articles related to your research question/objective. Often literature search helps you to redefine/restate your research question.

    Article selection for the project should be based on your evaluation. Consider the following in selecting an article for this project:
    o authority of the article
    o content of the article
    o methodological considerations
    o comparisons to other articles you found in your search
    o limitations of article

    Make two copies of each article – one to keep and one to submit with this project.

    Review of Literature: In this section you will write a coherent and organized review of literature you have collected on your research question. Write a 1000 word review (double spaced, font size 12, one inch margins on all sides) using at least 10 references characterizing what is known in your chosen area of research. Literature review is not a simple summary from each article. This is an integrated and analytical summary incorporating results from those articles. This should look like an essay with a brief introduction and a logical conclusion. Try not to focus on the methodologies of the articles. Mainly, use results and discussion from the research articles to build your literature review.

    Methodology (How you intend to test the hypothesis?): Each group will develop a research questionnaire designed to collect the data necessary to answer your research question and hypothesis. The questionnaire will be submitted to the class for content analysis. On the day of questionnaire analysis, bring a few copies of your questionnaire to the class in addition to information on overall goal and hypothesis, target population, where and how you intend to sample this population for assessment, and variables that will be evaluated. Questionnaire content analysis by your peers will be done in the class on Nov 8.

    Data Collection and Data Analysis: Each group will find at least 15-20 subjects that fit the description of the target population. Use your peers in the class or your close family and friends. Criteria for subject selection must be clearly defined. Perform the appropriate statistical analysis of your data and develop the best way to present data (tables, figures, graphs, etc).

    Final Report: Must contain the following sections:

    Title Page: Title & Authors and Institution

    Structured Abstract-250 words long. Must contain: Background, Objective, Methods and Subjects, Results, Conclusions, Applications (follow J Am Dietetic Assoc or Am J Clin Nutr style)

    Introduction (Research Question, Needs Assessment, Hypothesis, Objectives, etc)

    Literature Review

    Methodology: This section will include description of subjects, settings/location, sample size, description of questionnaire, type of statistical procedures used, and the data presentation style.

    Results: In this section you will describe your findings in a logical fashion. This section will include tables, figures, and/or graphs. Results must be written in the past tense. All tables/figures must be referenced in the text of the results. Tables/figures should be able to stand alone (readers able to understand the results without referring to the text).

    Discussion: In this section you will discuss your results and their meaning. Did you prove or disprove your major hypothesis. If not, why not? Were there any errors in your approach or extenuating circumstances that must be explained for a real understanding of what is so. Discuss possible confounding variables that might have affected your results. How do your results compare with the existing literature? Do your results agree or disagree with the existing knowledge? Give logical explanation why the results came out the way they came out?

    Conclusion: This is your overall findings from your research (a concluding statement). In this section, you may also want to include the applications and future direction of your research

    Acknowledgments

    Literature cited: Use the citation format of the J Am Dietetic Assoc or Am J Clin Nutr. References listed in this section must have been cited in the text of your paper write up.

    Tables and Figures: Follow J Am Dietetic Assoc format. Each table should have a title at the top and each figure should have a legend at the bottom. Each table and figure should be numbered and printed on a separate page. All tables and figures should be at the back of the manuscript.

    Poster Presentation: Your group will present/display the poster to the entire class on the day you were assigned (25 points).

    Grading: Evaluation of the Group Research Project will be based on the Rubric given on page 11.


    Rational:
    Both assignments require students to identify a nutrition or dietetics-related problem and to select, critique, analyze, snythesize and communicate information which addresses the question, which is our major's definition of critical thinking. Students will complete assignments which will be evaluated based on rubrics and students will be given an opportunity to revise the assigments based on the feedback provided.


    Major: Nutrition
    Course Name: Senior Seminar
    Assignment:>
    Activities to Accomplish Objectives:

    Through brainstorming activities in conjunction with the faculty, students will develop main research questions to be investigated. During this process the following will occur:
    • Students and faculty will spend one class session discussing current and relevant nutrition questions and topics that can be evaluated.
    • After the main areas are determined, the students will be divided into assigned groups. Each student will develop a topic area to be investigated within their assigned research question.
    • Each student will select at least 10-15 articles addressing the individual topic related to the main research question utilizing evidence based guidelines to reach logical and justifiable conclusions. The student will critically examine the evidence and sources of such evidence, questioning accuracy, relevance and completeness.
    • Each student will submit an individual written summary of his/her topic related to the main research question. The written summary will be developed utilizing the best evidence for that topic. The summary will be evaluated according to a scoring rubric, returned and discussed (see guidelines below).
    • The student will resubmit the written summary utilizing feedback and comments on the scoring rubric.
    • Class discussions will be held at intervals throughout the semester where groups and individuals will lead the discussion based on the research question and topic.
    • Each of the groups will submit a draft position paper based on the research question and the individual topics related to that research question. The draft paper will be evaluated according to the scoring rubric.
    • Each group will lead a class and faculty discussion on the research question.
    • A final group position paper will be resubmitted and evaluated.

    Individual Summary Guidelines
    • The first step will be to locate 10-15 relevant articles to be used to construct the individual summary on the assigned topic.
    • The next step in the investigation of the topic will be to prepare a set of structured abstracts for each article following the guidelines found at http://www.adajournal.org/authorinfo
    • After the articles have been abstracted, there must be an evaluation process of the articles. The articles will then be annotated. Annotation is similar to an abstract, but does not have structure. It is a concise, evaluative summary of each source (article). An annotation includes source (citation), research question, or hypothesis (objective), its major methods of investigation, its main conclusions, and its relevance and value.
    • It should include:
    o Complete citation
    o Information to explain the authority and/or qualifications of the author.
    o Scope and main purpose of the work
    o Any biases you detect
    o Intended audience and level of reading difficulty
    o Evaluation of why you feel this work is suitable for your topic

    • The final step in this process is the integration of the various topic related articles into your summary. Both the abstracts, annotations, and original articles should be used for your individual summary contribution to the main research question. It is important to examine and discuss conflicting evidence as well. This will mean ranking the evidence and thoroughly discussing competing evidence in order to draw evidence-based conclusions and practice guidelines.
    • Every abstract and annotation will be submitted with the individual summary.



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Philosophy
    Course Name: Introductory Seminar in Philosophy (CTW)
    Assignment:>
    For this class you will write a paper in three drafts. The paper must: (1) disagree with or develop at least one point made in one of the readings on the assigned issue and (2) make an argument. The paper must be at least 1500-2000 words. As you complete the assignment, you should carefully review the handout on writing philosophy papers.

    Rational:
    Providing students the opportunity to engage in systematic discussions of primary texts and the philosophical issues they raise allows students to develop the critical thinking skills necessary to successfully defend a position. Additionally, they will need to demonstrate their writing skills in drafts of the seminar paper required in the course.


    Major: Philosophy
    Course Name: Senior Seminar in Philosophy (CTW)
    Assignment:>
    A major part of your grade in this course will be determined by a final paper. This paper will be written in parts over the course of the semester. The parts are:

    Topic description: Due date
    A topic description is a statement of the issue you will consider in your paper. It does not have to state your view on the issue (although it may), but it should indicate you have read the relevant text(s) and considered the argument you will be addressing. It should be no more than one page.

    Research overview: Due date
    Here you will provide a one-page explanation of at least two articles, not covered in this class, that discuss your topic. The articles must be from sources listed in The Philosopher’s Index and they must have been written since 1970. You must provide the complete citation for each article in Chicago style format.

    Thesis statement: Due date
    A thesis statement states your view on the issue you have chosen. It should be no more than one page.

    First draft: Due date
    The first draft of the paper is not a rough draft. It is complete and finished product that will receive a grade.

    Final draft: Due date
    The final draft of your paper should carefully respond to each and all of the comments I make on your first draft.

    Each of these five assignments should be well written. None of them is a rough draft. In each case, the quality of your writing is a major grading criterion. In particular, students sometimes fall into the trap of thinking that because the first three assignments are short, they do not need to spend too much time making sure that their prose is clear and grammatically correct. Be sure that you avoid this mistake.


    Rational:
    Providing students the opportunity to engage in systematic discussions of primary texts and the philosophical issues they raise allows students to develop the critical thinking skills necessary to successfully defend a position. Additionally, they will need to demonstrate their writing skills as they prepare each part of the seminar paper required in the course.


    Major: Physics and Astronomy
    Course Name: Advanced Physics Laboratory
    Assignment:>
    Exercise 1 to be given during first week of course: Given a scientific paper with the title, abstract, and conclusions removed, students will write those three sections of the paper based on their reading of the remaining sections.

    Exercise 2 (performed for each of six short laboratory experiments):
    Students will be writing reports for each of six one week laboratory experiments.

    Exercise 3 (performed once for a long experiment):
    Students will be writing a longer report for the four-week laboratory experiment.


    Rational:
    Exercise 1: This assignment will reveal
    1) their understanding of the structure of scientific papers and the purpose for that structure,
    2) their ability to think critically in evaluating the key points in the arguments presented,
    3) their ability to summarize those key points, and
    4) their ability to critically assess the implications of the individual findings to identify the most important.

    The students will receive comments on this assignment and have the ability to revise it. In this way the students receive feedback which allows them to develop their critical thinking and writing abilities.

    Exercise 2: This assignment requires the students to demonstrate critical thinking in how they collect experimental data, analyze the data, and interpret the results. In addition, the aspects of critical thinking identified as relevant to scientific writing will be apparent in
    1) the choices of ways to present results in words, graphs, and figures,
    2) in the structure of the report and its consistency with the purpose of each section, and
    3) in the choice of which information to present or not present as appropriate to the audience.

    Each of these laboratory reports will be given comments and the student will have the opportunity to revise the report. In this way the students receive feedback which allows them to develop their critical thinking and writing abilities.


    Exercise 3: This assignment demonstrates critical thinking in much the same way as the reports for the short experiments, although the more open ended longer experiment will require more conscious decision making regarding appropriate research questions and appropriate data to collect.


    Major: Physics and Astronomy
    Course Name: Research Project
    Assignment:>
    Assignment 1: Research Proposal
    Students will prepare a written proposal for the research they will pursue over the course of the term in collaboration with their research mentor. The proposal will have a clear statement of the goal of the research, the methods, and the significance of the expected results.

    Assignment 2-5: Introduction, Methods, Results & Discussion, Abstract and Conclusions
    Students will produce the sections of the final report in sequence. The research project will be performed in parallel with the writing assignments.

    Assignment 6: Final Report
    Students will assemble sections into a final report and address and incongruities between the sections.

    Rational:
    Assignment 1 will require the students to appropriately define the research question and to design the experiments to address that question.

    The sections written in assignments 2 through 5 will further elaborate on the motivations and significance of the research question, as well as the analysis and interpretation of their data and the development of conclusions. In addition, the critical thinking aspects relevant to scientific writing will be revealed in the choices of content and presentation in each section.

    The final report will reveal the coherence of the result with the research question posed and the appropriateness of the data collection and analysis choices.

    All sections up to the final report will be given comments and returned for mandatory revisions.


    Major: Public Management and Policy
    Course Name: Citizenship, the Community, and the Public Sector
    Assignment:>
    Citizenship MEMOs
    Each week for 13 weeks you are to post a memo regarding your service learning engagement on the bulletin board location set up for that week’s assigned memo. The weekly memos are worth 4 percent of the final grade each and must be posted before Sunday at midnight. These weekly memos are designed to be no more than a page in length and will generally (after the first two weeks) consist of three paragraphs that will be written in different computer fonts:
    1. This paragraph will record facts. It will provide a brief record of things seen, read, or observed in your community setting.
    2. This paragraph will describe your feelings in response to the activities in your community setting. In other words, how did you feel about the things you saw, read about, and observed in your placement?
    3. This paragraph will make connections to the learning objectives of the course. In other words, how did your experiences during the week connect to the objectives established for the class?

    These weekly memos will be available for all members of the class to read. While this is not an English course, you are expected to submit memos that are written with care and thoroughly edited before they are submitted. Memos that do not reflect care in composition and content will be returned and must be re-submitted before they will be graded. After all, the quality of your writing is how most people will judge the quality of your education as a whole. Memos posted after the Sunday midnight deadline will be penalized one point per day that the assignment is late (in other words, if you do not post the memo before the following Thursday at midnight, you receive no points for the weekly assignment).


    For a term project, each student will prepare a report that describes the connection between civic and political involvement. The report will be based on the student’s theoretical understanding of citizenship as well as personal involvement in a civic or political organization, as completed through the service learning component of the course. The written final report will be 2,500 words plus cover sheet and reference list. The final report is worth 20 percent of the final grade. These written reports will form the basis of an oral report to the class. The oral report will be worth 8 percent of the final grade.

    Rational:
    Critical thinking through writing will be emphasized through frequent assignment of written products that require meshing practical application with academic. Sustained Instructor feedback regarding these written products will encourage students to advance their interpretations of facts and feelings as well as the links between the two.

    The memos noted above provide an avenue for students to collect and assess different types of information -- facts, feelings, and concepts learned while engaged in community service. Students will get into the habit of assessing these types of information and clearly articulating their assessment in written form, incorporating each component efficiently. Continued Instructor feedback will support student learning about their service engagement, interpretation of the learning environment and communication about experiences. At the conclusion of the course, students should have the ability to speak and write knowledgeably and critically about their community service and the outcomes from such engagement.

    The more expansive report requirement of the course above provides a substantive avenue for students to link academic thought to real world service experience. This assignment provides students the ability to think critically about the links between theory and practice and to clarify such links in the report. Both this report and the weekly memos above require students to be engaged in practical service experiences, interpret such experiences, support explanation with facts and then present an assessment of the connections between facts, feelings and experiences.


    Major: Public Management and Policy
    Course Name: Evaluating Public Policy
    Assignment:>
    The CTW assignment consists of an evaluation research proposal where students are expected to integrate research methods and evaluation theory and apply them to a real problem. The final evaluation proposal is due at the end of the semester; however, I will review and evaluate drafts of earlier versions to help you develop your critical thinking and writing skills. The drafts and the final proposal will be evaluated using a scoring rubric that is typically used by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) when evaluating research proposals.

    Rational:
    Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to properly design a practical reasearch proposal which includes developing hypotheses, selecting an appropriate research design and justifying their design choices with theory or practical considerations. The students will get feedback through the submission of early drafts.


    Major: Political Science
    Course Name: Introduction to Political Research
    Assignment:>
    Political Science 3800
    Homework #2

    In The Millionaire Next Door, authors Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko argue that any individual can become wealthy simply by spending his or her money frugally. They present evidence in the form of interviews with millionaires, all of whom (claim to) spend their money quite frugally. Read the attached chapter, in which the authors apply their theory to the process of buying a car, examining millionaire purchasing habits.

    In a 3 page paper, critique the research methods used in the chapter you’ve read. This critique must include the following
    - Identify the key components of the authors’ research. This includes describing the author’s theory, defining the independent and dependent variables, and describing the author’s research design (i.e., what type of study is it, who are the groups, what’s the treatment, etc.)
    - For one of the independent variables the authors employ (and there are many used in the chapter), derive a hypothesis which is predicted by the author’s theory. Then, briefly describe a “non-experiment” (as the phrase is used in the class) which would test the hypothesis. When you’re drawing up your research design, you may assume the ability to collect any reasonably observable data, regardless of what is in the chapter.


    Terms used in the book:
    - UAW – Under-accumulator of wealth. Somebody who owns less wealth than he or she should, given his income and age. The book’s villains.
    - PAW – Prodigious accumulator of wealth. Somebody who owns more wealth than he or she should, given his income and age. The book’s heroes.


    Rational:
    These assignments ask students to evaluate the quality of research by applying components of CT relevant to the discipline of political science. In this assignment the specific CT elements being examined are identification of question or issue, consideration of assumptions and formulation of a testable hypothesis. By critically examining these aspects of the work students develop an understanding of the issues associated with each of these skills.


    Major: BIS-Community Studies
    Course Name: Introduction to Political Research
    Assignment:>
    Political Science 3800
    Homework #2

    In The Millionaire Next Door, authors Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko argue that any individual can become wealthy simply by spending his or her money frugally. They present evidence in the form of interviews with millionaires, all of whom (claim to) spend their money quite frugally. Read the attached chapter, in which the authors apply their theory to the process of buying a car, examining millionaire purchasing habits.

    In a 3 page paper, critique the research methods used in the chapter you’ve read. This critique must include the following
    - Identify the key components of the authors’ research. This includes describing the author’s theory, defining the independent and dependent variables, and describing the author’s research design (i.e., what type of study is it, who are the groups, what’s the treatment, etc.)
    - For one of the independent variables the authors employ (and there are many used in the chapter), derive a hypothesis which is predicted by the author’s theory. Then, briefly describe a “non-experiment” (as the phrase is used in the class) which would test the hypothesis. When you’re drawing up your research design, you may assume the ability to collect any reasonably observable data, regardless of what is in the chapter.


    Terms used in the book:
    - UAW – Under-accumulator of wealth. Somebody who owns less wealth than he or she should, given his income and age. The book’s villains.
    - PAW – Prodigious accumulator of wealth. Somebody who owns more wealth than he or she should, given his income and age. The book’s heroes.


    Rational:
    These assignments ask students to evaluate the quality of research by applying components of CT relevant to the discipline of political science. In this assignment the specific CT elements being examined are identification of question or issue, consideration of assumptions and formulation of a testable hypothesis. By critically examining these aspects of the work students develop an understanding of the issues associated with each of these skills.


    Major: Political Science
    Course Name: Senior Seminar in Political Science
    Assignment:>
    Assignment: Research Paper

    One of the main assignments for this course is to produce a 20-25 page research paper which further develops your critical thinking skills. The paper will account for 40% of the grade for the course. The topic for the paper will be aligned with the theme of this Senior Seminar and will be decided by each student in consultation with the instructor. The research paper will be developed in four stages. At each stage you will receive detailed feedback based on the criteria described below. You will use this feedback for revision of the completed stage and further development of the paper.

    Stage I: Finalization of topic (5% of grade)
    The ideal submission at this stage will clearly identify the central question being examined as well as its relationship with subsidiary and embedded issues. It will identify underlying assumptions and context, question their validity and discuss their impact and/or implications.

    Stage II: Testable hypothesis, working outline and initial bibliography (10% of grade)
    This submission will state the testable hypothesis which is at the core of the investigation.
    An exemplary outline will be formulated after a review of the relevant literature. The final segment of this stage will include an initial bibliography

    Stage III: Initial draft of paper (10% of grade)
    This draft will flesh out the outline, identifying relevant facts and showing evidence of selection of appropriate data and competent source evaluation. It will include analysis of the data, clearly stated conclusions and an examination of the implications or consequences of the conclusions. It will also identify and integrate other perspectives in a thoughtful and respectful manner.

    Stage IV: Final paper (15% of grade)
    The final paper will integrate feedback from the initial draft.


    Rational:
    This assignment to be completed in several stages over the course of the semester using instructor feedback and revisions by students will develop and practice each of the skills identified as critical thinking skills for the discipline of political science.


    Major: Psychology
    Course Name: Advanced Research Design and Data Analysis
    Assignment:>
    Example 1, "Critical Thinking in Research"

    Step 1: Read through the handout on Critical Thinking provided in class. Then, with the other members of your group, brainstorm about the ways that critical thinking would be useful or important during the research process. Be prepared to discuss your group’s results with the rest of the class.

    Step 2: Write down the ideas generated by your group in the space below and on the back of this sheet. Be sure to note which element of critical thinking (e.g., Valuing truth above self-interest) you are talking about and to address all of the elements of the component (affective, cognitive, or behavioral) that your group has been assigned.

    Step 3: Homework assignment - reflective essay on the challenges of scientific and critical thinking.


    Example 2, "What Toys Can Tell Us"

    Students are provided with a current toy catalog and assigned to work in groups of 3-4. Each group is assigned one of the hypotheses below:


    Hypothesis A: Boys are more encouraged than girls to develop science and/or math skills.

    Hypothesis B: Girls are more encouraged than boys to develop interpersonal and/or communication skills.

    Hypothesis C: Boys are prepared more than girls to have a job when they grow up.

    Hypothesis D: Girls are more encouraged than boys to develop and express their creativity.


    Your responsibility as a group is to:

    1. Identify the variable(s) relevant to answering your research questions. Each variable must have at least two levels (or sub-categories).

    2. Create an operational definition for each variable and its levels that will allow you to easily categorize and count occurrences of the variable in the catalog.

    3. Gather and record data from the catalog.

    4. Describe your findings and interpret them with regard to the hypothesis you tested.

    Each member of the group is responsible for preparing and submitting his/her own responses to the questions above; the results should be typed and proofread.


    Rational:
    SAME as for Psyc 4800


    Major: Psychology
    Course Name: Laboratory Experience in Psychology
    Assignment:>
    Note - this course is considered a lab-based capstone alternative to senior seminar (Psyc 4800). Assignments will be similar, but will focus on empirical research papers rather than papers based solely on library research. No sample syllabus for Psyc 4000 is available yet.

    Rational:
    SAME as for Psyc 4800


    Major: Psychology
    Course Name: Seminar-CTW
    Assignment:>
    The end goal of this assignment is for you to write a 10-12 page critical literature review, using the APA Style Manual, 5th Edition. In this paper, you will present arguments on the future theoretical and empirical directions for one topic in the field of social-emotional development. The topic is of your choosing, but requires my approval. In this paper, you will discuss the history of your topic, its current status, where you forecast it is headed (and why) and where you believe it should be headed (and why). There will be one week of class time (Week 6) dedicated to how to effectively conduct library research and articulate your thesis and organize your paper.

    A detailed outline of at least 5 double-spaced pages plus an annotated bibliography of at least 10 sources is due on XXX. The outline is worth 20% of your course grade. In order to receive credit for it, you must have met with me prior to the due date and received my approval of your thesis. The goal of this course is learning, not just performance. To that end, you are permitted to make up your outline for a new grade (the new grade will be averaged with the original one), as long as you turn in the make-up outline in time to receive feedback on it before turning in the first draft of your final paper.

    A first draft of the paper is due on XXX. It is worth 25% of your grade. You will receive feedback on it within a week and a half

    The final three weeks of the semester are reserved for student presentations on their future directions topics. Presentations should last approximately 20 minutes and should emphasize discussion. To facilitate discussion, each student will assign the class one short article from the journal, Child Development Perspectives, to read and will distribute it one week before the presentation. (Discussion points will be handed in for these articles.) Classmates will rate the presentation’s level of quality as a learning experience, and I will take these ratings into account when assigning a grade and summarize their feedback for the student. The presentation is worth 25% of the course grade.


    Rational:
    The focus of each CTW course in Psychology will be a research project based on either empirical data or library research through which students will develop and refine the following skills:

    1) Clearly communicating their intentions in oral, visual, and written formats that are appropriate for the discipline

    2) Organize their ideas in a thoughtful and effective manner appropriate to the purpose and audience for the communication

    3) Provide their audience with complete, relevant, and accurate detail regarding the topic and/or argument

    4) Use information ethically according to guidelines provided by the American Psychological Association

    5) Demonstrate their thorough understanding of an argument and contribute usefully to it through novel ideas and scientific evidence


    This will be accomplished through opportunities to draft and revise all or part of assignments over the course of the semester.


    Major: Real Estate
    Course Name: Real Estate Analysis
    Assignment:>
    1. Fan Pier Case

    a. What were the goals of each of the players in forming this partnership? How would you evaluate the relationship of Athanas and HBC over the years?

    b. Assess the approval process governing this megaproject.

    c. What would you recommend be built on the site at this point in time? What might be the recommendation of a South Boston community leader, or the Director of the Boston Redevelopment Authority?

    d. Compare the story of Fan Pier to that of Battery Park. What lessons can be learned?

    2. Southpark IV Case

    a. Is this a good property for Laflin to acquire?

    b. What assumptions has Laflin made in creating his setup for Southpark IV? What changes, if any, would you make to his setup? What is your projected return for Southpark IV?

    c. What price should Laflin offer for Southpark IV? What conditions should he attach to his offer? How might Lonestar try to justify a higher price? What might Southpark IV be worth in five years?

    d. Why are there wide variations in the valuation of real property assets?

    Students will be assigned questions on each case. Their answers will be evaluated using the rubric. An example of the questions and the objectives on which the answers will be evaluated is shown in the table. The evaluations on each question will be totaled and weighted according to the scheme shown in the rubric.





    Rational:
    The instructor of RE4700 will design and assign cases and projects that will require students to use critical thinking abilities expected in the real estate field.

    Specifically, the assignments will require students to:
    • Gather, organize, and classify, pertinent information, materials, and data
    • Evaluate assumptions, evidence, ideas, and information
    • Analyze information
    • Consider and/or integrate disparate ideas and information
    • Develop rational, reasonable, and informed conclusions
    • Present a clear expression of derived conclusions, judgments, and solutions.

    Two case write ups will be submitted as drafts for feedback and a score using rubrics; then the students will be required to revise their work and resubmit to the instructor for evaluation and another score. In each case, the students will be required to use knowledge they have gained in earlier prerequisites courses in combination with what they have inferred from the case to draw conclusions about the best course of action in the situation.


    Major: Religious Studies
    Course Name: Introduction to Methods and Theories
    Assignment:>
    Assignment Number 1: The Capture (note: taken from Allison Pingree, Harvard University)

    This is an example of “low-stakes” in-class writing. Sometimes I will use this “capture” format, and sometimes I will make it even easier by handing out a sheet that asks students merely 1) to summarize the argument of their reading and 2) to tell me if they agree or disagree and why. In any case, in these exercises the goal is to teach students how to understand and summarize an argument in their own words. A surprising number can’t do this! Here’s the “capture” assignment:

    The word “capture” implies grasping or taking hold of. It suggests an active mind rather than a passive one. It suggests conscious organizing of what you read—making sense out of it, instead of just hoping something will stick in your mind. Please “capture” the article you read for today by answering these questions:

    1. Purpose. Why has the author tried to communicate?




    2. Central Message. What exactly is the point, the essence, the main idea?




    3. Evidence. How did the author support his or her central message?




    4. Values/Assumptions. Where does the author stand? What does he or she believe in? What is taken for granted here?



    Assignment Number 2: Reading with Questions

    You read the Gandhi passages for today’s class. Our first task is to understand what he’s saying, which we’ve already done in class. Now we want to ask probing questions of the text, think about its nuances and relate it to other things we already know about religious experience. Please answer the following questions and we can discuss your answers in class.

    What is his view of human nature? What is his view of the body?





    What’s the relationship here between passively waiting for God and actively doing?






    What is the inner work required here to perfect the self?






    Plot out the stages involved in Gandhi’s spirituality.





    Assignment Number 3: Reading Actively


    The following is a handout I often use. I give this out, then discuss it, and then pass out a photocopy of just one or two paragraphs from the previous evenings’ readings. I have them use this handout to read these paragraphs closely. Finally, I either hand out or project on the board a copy of my own annotated paragraph, with all my questions, notes and reflections. In these ways, I try to get students reading actively. Here’s the handout:

    Reading Actively

    When you read something make it an active (rather than passive) exercise. Know why you are reading. What do you want to know? What questions do you have? What can the text teach you? What is interesting about the text? Reading with questions in mind is one way to read actively.

    Read with questions in mind.

    You might think of active reading as reading with a set of questions in mind. Because we often want to understand an author’s purposes, strategies and arguments, you might start with questions like—What is this person saying? Why is s/he saying it? How is this author making these points? What forms of evidence is s/he using? Is their argument persuasive? Answer these questions in your head as you do your reading.

    Think about it.

    Schedule time for reflection. Even if it’s only a few minutes, take time to paraphrase passages in the text. Explain to yourself the author’s argument. Review the evidence. If you are using your own text, you might write these reflections in the text’s margins. This will help you remember key points.

    Examine the basic parts of your text.

    In addition to understanding an author’s purposes and arguments, you want to consider how the text works—what are its basic parts, key words, images or metaphors? Here is a short list of things you should think about when reading our texts closely:

    1. What is this text about? What is the author saying? What's the argument?
    2. What are key terms used here?
    3. Are there unresolved tensions or ambiguities? Are there lingering questions?
    4. What is the structure of the text? Where are the climactic or key moments?
    5. What is the emotional tone of the text? Is something troubling this author? Did he/she write this out of anger, sadness or joy?
    6. Are there recurring images or metaphors in the text? Why are they important?

    Don't be afraid to mark up your text (in pencil) with answers to these questions -- and with additional comments or questions of your own. When you're done with this, you'll be ready to think about generating answers to these questions in your essay drafts. (Note: Adapted from Anne Monius and Harvard's Bok Center teaching materials)


    Assignment Number 4: Understanding How a Scholarly Article Works

    In this assignment I want us to think more about how scholars make arguments and attempt to persuade their readers. How does this article work? How does it introduce material, summarize, make arguments and conclude? What are the key sections of the text? How might you understand its main points quickly? Please reflect on the following questions. We will discuss your answers in class.

    What’s Harding’s thesis?




    How does Harding organize or outline her paper? What are the sub-sections here?




    What kinds of evidence does Harding use to support her claims? Is this evidence persuasive? Why?




    How does Harding’s analysis illuminate aspects of Edwards’s biography and his sermons?




    What does Harding’s analysis tell us about the “evangelical” style we’ve been discussing in this part of the course?


    Assignment Number 5: Conceptualizing Thesis Statements


    Today we will read actively one passage from the Emerson text you read last night. We will use the “Active Reading” skills we’ve already discussed. But this time we also will think about how to go from reading something carefully to raising questions and answering those questions in thesis statements. Please fill out the short worksheet below and we will talk about your answers in class.

    List the questions that these passages raise for you.





    Pick one question that you think you can answer using just this Emerson text. It should be a question that concerns how the text works, what it says, or how it says it. What are the implications, tensions, nuances of the text?






    Formulate a thesis that answers your question. Check the thesis: Can you argue and prove it using just the Emerson text? If not, reformulate it.


    Assignment Number 6: Self- and Peer-Assessment Guides for Student Writers

    These are exercises I use to help students think more critically about their writing. The “Student Self-Assessment” is something I have all students do on the day their paper drafts are due. The “Peer Assessment” is a form that students use when reading each others’ papers. I give them very specific instructions about this and am available during the process. After doing the self assessment and then getting a peer’s view on their drafts, they go back to their drafts (outside of class) and revise.

    Student Self-Assessment Sheet

    Instructions: Please put away your paper drafts and answer the following questions.

    What are some of the questions you had about the documents you’re writing about? What was the question that you’re trying to answer in your paper?







    In one sentence, what is the thesis (or main argument) of this paper?








    Sketch a very brief (4 or 5 line) outline of your paper. Was this easy or difficult to do?








    What do you think needs to be improved about your essay?





    Peer Assessment Sheet

    What did you like about this paper? What did it do well?





    In a sentence, what is the main point (or thesis) of this paper? Is the thesis easy to understand? Is it clearly stated at the beginning of the paper?







    Sketch out a very brief (4 or 5 line) outline of this paper. Was this easy or difficult to do? Is it easy or difficult to understand how this paper was organized? Does your outline match your peer’s?







    How well does this paper substantiate (provide evidence for) its thesis or for other assertions? Does it use evidence from the texts? Does it use that evidence persuasively?








    How might you strengthen this paper’s main argument? Can you think of objections to it? Does the thesis need to be altered slightly to allow for these objections? Does the author need to incorporate more (or different kinds of) evidence?




    Rational:
    These assignments get students writing in "low-stakes" and even collaborative activities in the classroom. By doing a number of these in-class activites, they will become better at writing AND reading critically.


    Major: Religious Studies
    Course Name: Seminar in Religious Studies
    Assignment:>
    Assignment Number 1: The Capture (note: taken from Allison Pingree, Harvard University)

    This is an example of “low-stakes” in-class writing. Sometimes I will use this “capture” format, and sometimes I will make it even easier by handing out a sheet that asks students merely 1) to summarize the argument of their reading and 2) to tell me if they agree or disagree and why. In any case, in these exercises the goal is to teach students how to understand and summarize an argument in their own words. A surprising number can’t do this! Here’s the “capture” assignment:

    The word “capture” implies grasping or taking hold of. It suggests an active mind rather than a passive one. It suggests conscious organizing of what you read—making sense out of it, instead of just hoping something will stick in your mind. Please “capture” the article you read for today by answering these questions:

    1. Purpose. Why has the author tried to communicate?




    2. Central Message. What exactly is the point, the essence, the main idea?




    3. Evidence. How did the author support his or her central message?




    4. Values/Assumptions. Where does the author stand? What does he or she believe in? What is taken for granted here?



    Assignment Number 2: Reading with Questions

    You read the Gandhi passages for today’s class. Our first task is to understand what he’s saying, which we’ve already done in class. Now we want to ask probing questions of the text, think about its nuances and relate it to other things we already know about religious experience. Please answer the following questions and we can discuss your answers in class.

    What is his view of human nature? What is his view of the body?





    What’s the relationship here between passively waiting for God and actively doing?






    What is the inner work required here to perfect the self?






    Plot out the stages involved in Gandhi’s spirituality.





    Assignment Number 3: Reading Actively


    The following is a handout I often use. I give this out, then discuss it, and then pass out a photocopy of just one or two paragraphs from the previous evenings’ readings. I have them use this handout to read these paragraphs closely. Finally, I either hand out or project on the board a copy of my own annotated paragraph, with all my questions, notes and reflections. In these ways, I try to get students reading actively. Here’s the handout:

    Reading Actively

    When you read something make it an active (rather than passive) exercise. Know why you are reading. What do you want to know? What questions do you have? What can the text teach you? What is interesting about the text? Reading with questions in mind is one way to read actively.

    Read with questions in mind.

    You might think of active reading as reading with a set of questions in mind. Because we often want to understand an author’s purposes, strategies and arguments, you might start with questions like—What is this person saying? Why is s/he saying it? How is this author making these points? What forms of evidence is s/he using? Is their argument persuasive? Answer these questions in your head as you do your reading.

    Think about it.

    Schedule time for reflection. Even if it’s only a few minutes, take time to paraphrase passages in the text. Explain to yourself the author’s argument. Review the evidence. If you are using your own text, you might write these reflections in the text’s margins. This will help you remember key points.

    Examine the basic parts of your text.

    In addition to understanding an author’s purposes and arguments, you want to consider how the text works—what are its basic parts, key words, images or metaphors? Here is a short list of things you should think about when reading our texts closely:

    1. What is this text about? What is the author saying? What's the argument?
    2. What are key terms used here?
    3. Are there unresolved tensions or ambiguities? Are there lingering questions?
    4. What is the structure of the text? Where are the climactic or key moments?
    5. What is the emotional tone of the text? Is something troubling this author? Did he/she write this out of anger, sadness or joy?
    6. Are there recurring images or metaphors in the text? Why are they important?

    Don't be afraid to mark up your text (in pencil) with answers to these questions -- and with additional comments or questions of your own. When you're done with this, you'll be ready to think about generating answers to these questions in your essay drafts. (Note: Adapted from Anne Monius and Harvard's Bok Center teaching materials)


    Assignment Number 4: Understanding How a Scholarly Article Works

    In this assignment I want us to think more about how scholars make arguments and attempt to persuade their readers. How does this article work? How does it introduce material, summarize, make arguments and conclude? What are the key sections of the text? How might you understand its main points quickly? Please reflect on the following questions. We will discuss your answers in class.

    What’s Harding’s thesis?




    How does Harding organize or outline her paper? What are the sub-sections here?




    What kinds of evidence does Harding use to support her claims? Is this evidence persuasive? Why?




    How does Harding’s analysis illuminate aspects of Edwards’s biography and his sermons?




    What does Harding’s analysis tell us about the “evangelical” style we’ve been discussing in this part of the course?


    Assignment Number 5: Conceptualizing Thesis Statements


    Today we will read actively one passage from the Emerson text you read last night. We will use the “Active Reading” skills we’ve already discussed. But this time we also will think about how to go from reading something carefully to raising questions and answering those questions in thesis statements. Please fill out the short worksheet below and we will talk about your answers in class.

    List the questions that these passages raise for you.





    Pick one question that you think you can answer using just this Emerson text. It should be a question that concerns how the text works, what it says, or how it says it. What are the implications, tensions, nuances of the text?






    Formulate a thesis that answers your question. Check the thesis: Can you argue and prove it using just the Emerson text? If not, reformulate it.


    Assignment Number 6: Self- and Peer-Assessment Guides for Student Writers

    These are exercises I use to help students think more critically about their writing. The “Student Self-Assessment” is something I have all students do on the day their paper drafts are due. The “Peer Assessment” is a form that students use when reading each others’ papers. I give them very specific instructions about this and am available during the process. After doing the self assessment and then getting a peer’s view on their drafts, they go back to their drafts (outside of class) and revise.

    Student Self-Assessment Sheet

    Instructions: Please put away your paper drafts and answer the following questions.

    What are some of the questions you had about the documents you’re writing about? What was the question that you’re trying to answer in your paper?







    In one sentence, what is the thesis (or main argument) of this paper?








    Sketch a very brief (4 or 5 line) outline of your paper. Was this easy or difficult to do?








    What do you think needs to be improved about your essay?





    Peer Assessment Sheet

    What did you like about this paper? What did it do well?





    In a sentence, what is the main point (or thesis) of this paper? Is the thesis easy to understand? Is it clearly stated at the beginning of the paper?







    Sketch out a very brief (4 or 5 line) outline of this paper. Was this easy or difficult to do? Is it easy or difficult to understand how this paper was organized? Does your outline match your peer’s?







    How well does this paper substantiate (provide evidence for) its thesis or for other assertions? Does it use evidence from the texts? Does it use that evidence persuasively?








    How might you strengthen this paper’s main argument? Can you think of objections to it? Does the thesis need to be altered slightly to allow for these objections? Does the author need to incorporate more (or different kinds of) evidence?




    Rational:
    These assignments get students writing in "low-stakes" and even collaborative activities in the classroom. By doing a number of these in-class activites, they will become better at writing and reading critically.


    Major: Risk Management
    Course Name: Enterprise Risk Management
    Assignment:>
    Case Study: American Barrick Resources Corporation: Managing Gold Price Risk

    Primary Teaching Objective:
    This case is designed to allow students to observe the diversity of risk management options available to a firm to manage its exposure to financial risk. It also asks students to relate how the theoretical rationales for risk management are employed by practitioners.

    Case Study Questions:
    1. In the absence of a hedging program, estimate how sensitive Barrick’s operating cash flow is to a 1% change in gold prices. Use the data provided in the appendix to arrive at this result. For every 1% change in gold prices, how might its stock be affected? Discuss ways Barrick could manage its gold price exposure without using financial derivative contracts.

    2. What is the stated intent of Barrick’s hedging program? What should be the goal of a gold mine’s price risk management program?

    3. The case describes a number of strategies available to manage exposure to gold price risk. For each strategy listed below, describe the goal of the strategy, the contracts that are used to implement the strategy, the payoffs on the contracts (risk-profile diagrams), and the pros and cons of each strategy.
    a. Forward Contracts
    b. Collars
    c. Spot Deferred Contracts

    4. Do you find any evidence that Barrick’s risk management program created value for its shareholders ex ante? You should answer this question by considering each of the theoretical rationales for risk management (the value enhancing and the non-value enhancing rationales) and whether they are consistent with the practical contentions made by the managers at Barrick.

    5. Would you recommend Barrick continue with its hedging program as is? Increase the scope of the program? Or should they discontinue it? In addition, if you decide to maintain or increase the scope of the program, would you recommend they hedge using linear contracts or non-linear “insurance type” contracts? Please back up your conclusion with your rationale. Make sure you link it evidence found in the case or derived from your analysis.
    ************************************************
    Case Study: Aspen Technology, Inc.: Currency Hedging Review

    Primary Teaching Objective:
    This case is intended to allow students to analyze how a small, young firm’s business strategy creates currency exposure and a need to manage this exposure. Designed to allow students to explore the conflicting rationales for risk management and the measurement of exposures. (You might also want to read the Assigned Chapter 8 in Stulz’s book)

    Case Study Questions:
    1. What are Aspen Technology’s main exchange rate exposures? How does Aspen Tech’s business strategy give rise to these exposures as well as to the firm’s financing need? Please make sure you catalogue the relevant exposures.

    2. Calculate Aspen’s exposures by currency for the past year. What currencies is it long and short?

    3. What goal would you recommend for the firm’s currency risk management program? Why? Based on your goal, what type of exposure should Aspen be measuring? Please make sure you provide your rationale in detail for your recommendation.

    4. Should the firm maintain its policy of completely eliminating all exposure on booked sales? If not, what policy would you advocate and why? Please make sure you explain what evidence you employed to come to your conclusion.

    5. How, if at all, should Aspen’s recent transition from a private to a publicly-traded firm affect its approach to risk management? Make sure your “forecast”: is linked to evidence from the case, evidence you derived from the analysis of the case, or other information.


    Rational:
    same


    Major: Respiratory Therapy
    Course Name: Pulmonary Disease
    Assignment:>
    COMPUTER SIMULATIONS
    Undergraduate students in this class are responsible for taking 10 computer simulations throughout the semester. Computer simulations are available in the health sciences computer lab and the RT teaching lab in Kell Hall. After taking each simulation, students should provide a copy of the printout indicating the score to the professor. No printouts will be accepted after the due dates listed. These simulations will help you to better navigate the critical needs of patients. The list of computer simulations and their due dates are below:
    Arterial Blood Gas Assessment 11 January 2008
    The Complete Chest Exam 18 January 2008
    ACS 20 COPD/Home care 1 February 2008
    ACS 47 Status Asthmaticus 15 February 2008
    ACS 17 Congestive Heart Failure 14 March 2008
    ACS 02 Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome 4 April 2008
    ACS 35 Myastenia Gravis 11 April 2008
    PCS 08 Cystic Fibrosis 18 April 2008
    ACS 45 Smoke Inhalation 25 April 2008
    PCS 11 Near Drowning 25 April 2008

    CASE STUDIES

    At the conclusion of each chapter a case study will be assigned. As a student learning pulmonary disease you will be need to evaluate the (S)ubjective and (O)bjective information in the case. Once completed you will write an (A)ssessment and (P)lan for each patient case. You will be graded on the SOAP by the attached rubric. Each case will be evaluated, graded and given back to the student for reflection and discussion.



    Rational:
    Clinical simualations are a fundamental cornerstone in evaluating student respiratory therpaists ability to critically navigate a patients disease state. This is evident by the use of clinical simulation by the national creditialing.

    The writing of each case study will evaluate the student's ability to navigate a patient's disease state through writing. This in turn will help the student to better relate to the disease and critically evaluate the process.


    Major: Respiratory Therapy
    Course Name: Professional Practice: From Current Trends to Extended Care
    Assignment:>
    In class writing- Each student will be asked to write on a topic that affects the trends in healthcare. Each writing will be one page in length. The witing assingment will be returned to the student for reflection an be re-submitted for a final grade.

    In class debates on subjects listed in the syllabus.

    Rational:
    The writings for this course will do the same as it did when this course was designated a WAC course. The student will be more engaged to better evaluate proper practice as a respiratory therapist.


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Social Research Methods
    Assignment:>
    Research Proposal (30%)
    On December 11th you will submit a research proposal. Think of this proposal as the final research or term paper for this class. In this proposal you will develop a research protocol for answering some substantive question of your choosing. You will not actually conduct this research, but you will instead be evaluated on the appropriateness, feasibility, and thoroughness of the methodological framework you develop to answer your research question. This paper should be approximately 20 pages in length and adhere to the guidelines that are posted on uLearn. While we will discus the proposal instructions in class, I will not distribute hard copies. I deduct ten points per day (out of 100) for proposals turned in after December 11th.

    Research Proposal Presentation (5%)
    In lieu of a final exam in this class, you are required to make a formal presentation of your research proposal. Your presentation should be approximately 10 minutes long (an exact time limit will be established later in the semester when the number of students in the class is finalized). You will be evaluated on both the style and substance of your presentation, therefore some form of visual aide will be required (overheads, Power Point slides, etc.). Detailed information is available on uLearn. The presentations will take place during the final three class meetings and during the exam period. I will take attendance on all presentation days, including the final exam period, regardless of when you are presenting your own research proposal.

    Research Assignments (30%)
    Over the course of the semester, you will complete six individual assignments related to your research proposal. These assignments will take you step-by-step through the process of developing your proposal. I will discuss the specific instructions for each assignment in class and they are available on uLearn. You are responsible for turning in all assignments by the beginning of class on the date due. As with the research proposal, I deduct 10 points per day from late assignments.

    Rough Drafts/Peer Review (5%)
    A primary goal of this course is improved writing. The only way to improve one’s writing is to write, edit, and revise. You will submit a rough draft of each research assignment to an assigned research group member via uLearn. That person will evaluate your rough draft and you will revise your writing based on their evaluation before submitting it for a grade. All uLearn postings (both rough drafts and peer reviews) must be submitted as an attachment in Microsoft Word format. In order for your rough draft to be considered on-time, you must post it on the appropriate uLearn discussion page 12:00 noon on the scheduled day. Since a class member is depending on you to submit your paper on time, I do not give credit for late rough drafts.

    For each assignment, you will evaluate a peer’s rough draft. Peer reviews will be judged on-time if they have been posted on the uLearn discussion page by 12:00 noon on the scheduled day. I do not give credit for late peer reviews for the same reason listed above.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in General Sociology:Wealth, Power, & Inequality
    Assignment:>
    1. Three written exams (including a non-cumulative final) are worth 25% of your grade each. These exams will be based on written essays and students will be expected to revise each exam at least once. The highest of your three grades will be weighted more inasmuch as it will be worth 30% of your grade. The objective section of the exams will be worth 70% of each exam grade and the essays will make up the remaining 30%.

    2. You are required to submit two writing assignments. You will be given four opportunities.
    The first two you turn in will each count 5% of your grade.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in General Sociology: Sociological Theory
    Assignment:>
    Course Assignments:
    Paper 1: Discuss the Durkheimian, Weberian, and/or Marxist themes reflected in Fight Club.
    Paper 2: Apply functionalist, conflict, or symbolic interactionist perspectives to a current event.

    These assignments are intended to facilitate critical thinking through writing to reflect the CTW objectives outlined under course policies. As such, you will have the opportunity to revise and resubmit these papers within two weeks of their return.



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Families, Health, and the Life Course: Birth and Parenthood
    Assignment:>
    PAPERS
    Your papers should show that you are thinking sociologically about issues we’re reading about and discussing; that you can write clearly and analytically about the relationship between course material and something outside of class that you investigate yourself; that you can interpret data you collect yourself; and that you can generate a sociological argument that illuminates your findings coherently. Your writing should be grammatically correct and words should be spelled correctly. (See “HELPFUL WRITING TIPS,” p. 7.)

    Plagiarism is evil, immoral, against university policy, and will result in failure in the course. So don’t do it! See http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwdos/codeofconduct_conpol.html for GSU policy. It is irrelevant whether you mean to pass off someone else’s work as your own or whether you are simply careless. All citations, ranging from direct quotations to loose summaries of someone else’s work must be properly documented. Whether you cite directly or paraphrase, you must also provide page numbers. If you use any material you find on the internet, you must provide complete web addresses for it.

    You should use internal citation (rather than footnotes); you should use social science style, which includes author’s last name (or authors’ last names), date of publication, and page number(s) in parentheses. You do not need to provide a bibliography unless you use outside sources. (For examples, see “BASIC RULES OF CITATION,” p. 8).

    Drafts and final versions of papers should be 5-8 pp., typed, double-spaced, in a font no larger than 12 pts.

    Please feel free to discuss your topics and methods with me; I can help you to design interview questions or to formulate research strategies for observation or content analyses.

    Late drafts and papers will be penalized 1/3 grade for each day late they are, unless you have arranged an incomplete with me in advance of (not on) the due date.

    Paper #1:
    Interview someone (or two people) about their birth, infertility, and/or adoption experiences. Find out about what their pregnancies were like, what their infertility experiences were like, and/or what led them to adopt. Find out about what their expectations for birth were, and contrast this with what their actual experiences were like. (You may write about yourself if you feel you can analyze your experiences sociologically, but it is preferable to interview someone else.) Use Laboring On and the chapters from Born in the USA as analytic tools. You do not need to do outside reading for this paper.

    Paper #2:
    Option A: Observe some aspect of parenting or child care in a systematic manner. Analyze your observations, drawing on at least two things we have read in class. (For instance, observe parent-child interactions in a public setting, or compare two public settings, to discuss whether/how men and women parent differently in public; observe child care workers’ interactions with children. How is the social organization of child care work gendered? “raced”? classed? And what does this mean for workers, parents, and children? etc.) You do not need to do outside reading for this paper.

    Option B: Interview someone(or two people) about their parenting/parented experiences (similar to paper #1). Analyze your observations, drawing on at least two things we have read in class. (For instance, interview a lesbian mom, a stay-at-home dad, a grown-up child who grew up in a conventional two-parent home – about their ideas about what constitutes ideal parenting. Interview several people about their views on and experiences of parental discipline and the issue of child abuse, etc.) You do not need to do outside reading for this paper.

    Option C: Analyze (a) media representation of – or public policy regarding – some aspect of parenting experience in a systematic way. Analyze your findings, drawing on at least two things we have read in class. (For instance, compare parent-child conflict scenes in a particular tv show; look at newspaper treatment of gay & lesbian parents over the past ten years, etc.) You do not need to do outside reading for this paper.


    Always keep a computer file and hard copy of your drafts and papers. If you want your second paper returned to you with my comments, please submit it in a self-addressed stamped envelope.


    Rational:
    Assignments are geared to develop students' analytical, interpretive, and communication skills. Students will be assessed in terms of how well they are able, through their writing: to demonstrate their understanding of sociological research reports/articles/books/theories; to analyze and interpret these research reports/articles/books/theories; and to use results of their analyses to formulate new research questions and/or to extend analyses in new directions.


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Families, Health, and the Life Course:Families and Society
    Assignment:>
    Activity Paper – 40 points
    Activity papers are intended to allow you to integrate your newly gained knowledge in an active way, hence the term “activity.” This assignment will assist you in developing your critical thinking and writing skills through direct application of the course content.

    Because this is a Critical Thinking Through Writing course, we will focus intently on these papers in three phases. First, you will submit a draft of the analysis on October 8 for an initial grade of up to 10 points. Second, you will revise the paper in order to address the feedback from the first draft. This revision process will include the assistance of a writing specialist in the Writing Center on the ninth floor of GCB. The Center can get very busy so you will want to make an appointment early in the process. Third, you will turn in your final draft on November 7. The final draft will be assessed on both the content of the analysis and how well you have addressed the feedback from the first draft of your analysis. The final draft will be worth up to 30 points.

    A section below lists the different options from which you may select the activity you wish to complete. We will discuss these various options in class. Again, the first draft of your analysis is due on Wednesday, October 8, and final papers are due on November 7. Late papers will be docked 5 points for each day they are late. I do not accept papers via email.

    • These papers must demonstrate creativity, insight about the issues and experience, placing the experience into sociological perspective, the ability to make connections, and synthesis of this experience and your observations with course material – all properly cited according to standards discussed in the syllabus. Sometimes this may involve readings that we have not yet discussed in class. If you are writing on a future subject, you are expected to read ahead. Finally, I expect it all to be expressed in a clear, concise, thorough, and well-organized manner.
    • These options are only suggestions. If you have an idea not presented here, please come and discuss it with me. If I approve it, you may complete an activity paper of your own creation. YOU MUST GET APPROVAL FROM ME PRIOR TO BEGINNING YOUR OWN PROJECT. Do not simply turn in your own activity and expect to get credit for it without my prior consent.
    • This paper should be 5 to 7 pages long, typed (unless otherwise noted in the description) and double-spaced. You should include a separate title page bearing your name, the date, the title of the paper, and the name of the course. DO NOT put your name anywhere else in the paper except for that first title page.
    • Be sure to cite your paper. Citations for books should read (Savage 2006:52) in the body of the text and the bibliographic form should mirror those on page 5, only without the ISBN number. Citations for lectures should read (Sheff lecture 9/22/07) in the body of the text and include the topic in the bibliography. Citations for articles in the text should read (author of article date of publication: page number) in the body of the text and then include the article title in quotes in the bibliography. For instance, if you were to cite the first article you would include this reference in the bibliography: Gittens, Diana. 2007. “Family in Question: What is the Family? Is it Universal?” pp. 7 – 17 in Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families edited by S. Ferguson. Third Edition. New York: Mc Graw Hill.
    • As a general piece of advice, you should always keep a copy of your paper until the original is returned, and then keep that graded copy of the paper (and quizzes or exams) until you learn your final semester grade.

    Option 1: Media Analysis
    For this project, you should choose a form of media—magazine, TV or radio show, song/CD, computer/video game, website, or film—that deals with families or family issues in America, and analyze its content for the ways in which families are depicted.

    Keep in mind the following questions when conducting/writing up your analysis:
    ü What type of media are you analyzing? Who is the intended audience?
    ü What is being depicted here? (Brief summary)
    ü What are the main messages that this media source is sending?
    ü What does it teach those who view it?
    ü Does this media source reinforce or challenge traditional notions about families?
    ü From what political/theoretical perspective do you think the creator/writer is coming?
    ü Are there any changes that you would make to this source in order to improve it?

    Option 2: Family Tree
    For this assignment you will create a detailed discussion of your family’s lineage for as long of a period as you can manage. You can amass this information by talking with family members about who is in your family and how they are related to you and each other, how they get/got along, where they live/d, and any other information with which your relatives are forthcoming. In addition to speaking with relatives, you might consider using the internet to find additional family members and genealogy sites. Those of you whose ancestors were kidnapped and enslaved should try to find out as much about the family in the West and, if possible, anything available about the family or culture from which the original family members were abducted. While I do not require it, many students find it useful to include a pictorial depiction of the family tree (sometimes with pictures) as well as the textual discussion. Inclusion of a pictorial depiction of the family tree augments, but does not replace or substitute for any of the required text.

    Option 3: Interviews
    To complete any of these interview options, you must have a list of pre-prepared questions that you will ask and the name and phone number of the person you plan to interview. I must pre-approve your questions BEFORE the interview. If I have not seen your questions and you turn in this paper, you will get an F on the paper. You must inform the person you plan to interview of the nature of this interview and tell them that they can stop the interview at any point, decline to answer any question, and ask you any of the questions you have posed to them. A record of the interview is necessary for you to write the paper, so either tape the interview (if you have the interviewee’s permission) or take notes.

    A. If you know a religious leader, talk to them about the role of family in that religion, how it may compare with other religions, the options the religion offers to support families, and what kind(s) of families are welcome to worship in that leader’s community. If you do not know a religious leader, there are some in town who may be willing to talk with you if you called in advance for an appointment. Relate the religious leader’s responses to the course readings, lectures, and discussions.

    B. Another interview possibility involves speaking to a person over the age of 65 (or so) about families. I want their perspective over the years, if they have noticed any changes, in what areas, what was it like for them when they were your age, what do they think of these changes? It is a big world, and we can learn something from those who have had more time here to experience things and think about the world. You may combine this option with the family tree option listed above.

    C. You may also interview a romantic partner or potential romantic partner regarding their ideas about family. What is their family of origin like, and what kind of family, if any, do they foresee establishing in the future? Would they like to marry? Why or why not? Have children? How would they handle the division of domestic labor, paid work, money, responsibility, and decision making?

    D. Finally, you may interview someone who has been married for more than five years or someone who has been or is in the process of a divorce. What is this person’s perspective on marriage? Why did they marry? What was/is it like? What advice, if any, do they have on sustaining a marriage or participating in a divorce? For those who divorced, what spurred the divorce? How did it go? How do they feel about it now?



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Families, Health, and the Life Course: Cognition and Society
    Assignment:>
    2. There also will be a series of written assignments that will center on six core concepts: perceiving, attending, classifying, signifying, timing, and remembering. These core concepts essentially are the six cognitive acts that constitute thinking. The assignments are designed to help you better understand how thinking is connected to the different communities to which people belong and/or use as reference points. These communities--often described as "thought communities" within the field of cognitive sociology--are complex and vary by societal factors, such as age, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual identity, country, historical era, political affiliation, etc. The assignments will involve your carrying out interviews, conducting observations, and perusing documents (either printed or electronic, e.g., newspaper articles or websites). You will be required to gather "data" and then write an analysis of what you discovered. Your writing will be evaluated for clarity and artistry as well as style and punctuation. Cognitive scientists say that writing is, itself, an act of thinking, and that by writing we do not simply set our thoughts to paper (like downloading a computer file); rather we actively construct what we think. In a course devoted to examining thinking, it is only appropriate that we would seriously examine one of the most important vehicles by which we think--writing.



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Families, Health, and the Life Course: Aging and Society
    Assignment:>
    Field Trip (40 points): During the semester, you will be required to make a field trip with a small group of your classmates to an aging service facility or institution. Your may choose a nursing home or assistant living facility in your neighborhood, state Health care or Medicare institution, non-profit organization serving the elderly population. The purpose of this field trip is to put you in touch with the real life of the elders and related institutions. After the field trip, you are expected to write a reflection paper about the field trip. Specific guidelines about the field trip, please see syllabus page 6.

    How to Write a Good Field Trip Reflection Paper
    Critical Thinking Through Writing

    To earn full credit of the field trip, you need to follow the following steps: First, you are expected to have established contact with an institution or facility you intend to observe. You need to turn in a brief report on that date about a) the institution you are visiting, b) their contact number, c) the contact person’s name, institution’s address, d) the names of classmates who are going together (due Sept. 18). If going in small groups, each group needs to provide only one report.

    Second, you are expected to have visited the site you chose. On Oct. 18th, you will turn in a brief report which details the time, place, and length of the visit as well as the names of classmates who visited the place and observed with you.

    Third, the paper is due on Nov. 27th, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving holiday. Because this assignment is particularly geared to develop your analytical, interpretive, and communication skills, you will be assessed in terms of how well they: are able to demonstrate their understanding of sociological contexts and reports in written assignments; analyze and interpret the context, where relevant; and demonstrate how to use results of their analyses to formulate new research questions. To write a good reflection paper, you need to keep in mind the issues that we have covered in the class. A good field trip reflection paper should include at least three parts: a description of the field trip, a critical assessment and analysis of the issues and contexts relating to the field trip or site, and raise future research questions or policy related questions about the field you visited, using the insight you have gained from the field trip.

    The description of the field trip should include some specific details of the visit, emphasizing sociologically relevant aspects, particularly those that are related to the topics covered in the class. To make the field trip fruitful, you might need to think through a few questions you want to raise during the field trip. In this way, you will be better prepared to write a meaningful paper.

    The discussions relating to the field trip should be specific, sociological, and relevant to the text material. You are strongly encouraged to identify the chapter, page number, or concepts that are pertinent to what you observed and found on your field trip.

    Lastly, you will describe any insights or new knowledge gained from the field trip. Here, you may also express concerns or make suggestions regarding issues or problems you encountered.
    After you have turned in the draft, I will provide you with my feed back; you will have another chance to revise and edit the paper. The final draft of the paper is due: Dec. 4th, in class.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Families, Health, and the Life Course:Identity, Self, and Social Interaction
    Assignment:>
    Research Paper - A research paper of approximately 10-15 pages (double-spaced) will be due on December 6. The paper may be a sociological: (1) autobiography, (2) analysis of an event or character in a novel; or (3) an analysis of existing findings and studies on a topic area of interest. There will be at least one opportunity to submit a draft copy for comments and revisions before the final December 6 deadline.

    Rational:
    Same


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Gender and Sexuality:Gender and Society
    Assignment:>
    1) Exams (Worth 20% each, total 60%.):
    You will have 3 exams, each based upon a combination of assigned readings and classroom activities (lectures, guest speakers, films, class/small group discussions). For each exam, the student will be given 2-3 discussion questions, and asked to pick one to answer in a written take-home essay of 3-5 pages. In this essay, you will use course materials to argue for and support your answer.

    2) In-class writing assignments (Worth 4% each, total 20%):
    At five times during the semester (unannounced), you will have an in-class writing assignment. You must be present at the start of class, stay for the entire class period, and complete the assignment/exercise to receive credit. Assignments will be returned with feedback, and you will be given the opportunity to do one rewrite over the course of the term. Complete instructions will be handed out in class on the day of the assignment. If you will not be able to attend class regularly—for whatever reason—be aware that this WILL lower your grade by as much as two letter grades.

    3) Media Analysis (Worth 20%):
    For this project, you should choose a form of media—magazine, TV or radio show, song/CD, music video, computer/video game, website, or film—and critically analyze the content for the way gender is depicted. Write up a 5-page, double-spaced, typed paper and be ready to briefly (i.e. 5 minutes or less) present your findings to the class. Presentations are not graded, but you must do one in order to receive a grade on your paper. Papers are due on the day of the presentation.

    Keep in mind the following questions when doing/writing up your analysis:
    • What type of media site are you analyzing? (Be sure to include enough information so that I can locate the source.)
    • Who is this media site targeted to?
    • What is depicted in this media site?
    • How is gender presented in this media site?
    • What (implicit and explicit) assumptions about gender are made?
    • What political perspective/theoretical framework is the creator coming from?
    • Does this media site reinforce or challenge stereotypes about gender?
    • What does it teach those who view it?
    • How would you change it (if you could)?


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Gender and Sexuality: Sexual and Intimate Violence
    Assignment:>
    1) Exams (Worth 30 pts. each, total 60 pts.):
    You will have 2 exams, each based upon a combination of assigned readings and classroom activities (lectures, guest speakers, films, class/small group discussions). For each exam, the student will be given 2-3 discussion questions, and asked to pick one to answer in a written take-home essay of 3-5 pages. In this essay, you will use course materials to argue for and support your answer.

    2) In-class writing assignments (Worth 4 pts. each, total 20 pts.):
    At five times during the semester (unannounced), you will have an in-class writing assignment. You must be present at the start of class, stay for the entire class period, and complete the assignment/exercise to receive credit. Assignments will be returned with feedback, and you will be given the opportunity to do one rewrite over the course of the term. Complete instructions will be handed out in class on the day of the assignment. If you will not be able to attend class regularly—for whatever reason—be aware that this WILL lower your grade by as much as two letter grades.

    3) Media Analysis (Worth 20 pts.):
    For this project, you should choose a form of media—magazine, TV or radio show, song/CD, music video, computer/video game, website, or film—and critically analyze the content for the way sexual and intimate violence is depicted. Write up a 5-page, double-spaced, typed paper and be ready to briefly (i.e. 5 minutes or less) present your findings to the class. Presentations are not graded, but you must do one in order to receive a grade on your paper. Papers are due on the day of the presentation.

    Keep in mind the following questions when doing/writing up your analysis:
    • What type of media site are you analyzing? (Be sure to include enough information so that I can locate the source.)
    • Who is this media site targeted to?
    • What is depicted in this media site?
    • How are sexual and intimate violence presented in this media site?
    • What (implicit and explicit) assumptions are made?
    • What political perspective/theoretical framework is the creator coming from?
    • Does this media site reinforce or challenge stereotypes about gender?
    • What does it teach those who view it?
    • How would you change it (if you could)?

    Don’t just write out the questions and answers; instead integrate your answers to these questions throughout your paper.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking through Writing in Race and Urban Studies: Crime and Punishment
    Assignment:>
    Research Paper (12-15 pages). The bulk of your grade is tied up in this project. This paper specifically addresses the CTW component of this course and is due on the last day of class in its final form. The creation of this final paper will take place in stages throughout the semester. The dates that each component is due to me are spelled out in the schedule portion of the syllabus. The components include:

    - A two page proposal for the research, detailing your chosen topic and its relevance
    - The draft of the introduction (2-3 pages)
    - The body draft (5-7 pages)
    - The conclusion draft (2-3 pages)
    - An annotated bibliography (3-4 pages)
    - The final paper (12-15 pages)
    -
    As I will give you full edits and constructive suggestions for improvement at each stage, you will have the opportunity to perfect the paper by the time it reaches completion. We will discuss the details of this project early and often.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in Race and Urban Studies: Race and Ethnic Relations
    Assignment:>
    Sociological Bus Trippin' on the 49 and 16

    This assignment requires you to take two bus rides, one on the 16 (Noble line) and the other on 49 (McDonough line). Each round trip bus ride will take about an hour. I will not be providing you with tokens or bus fare. The cost of this assignment is however, tax deductible. You will be going through a number of very different neighborhoods. The 49 bus cuts through the neighborhoods of Capitol Homes, Turner Field, and Thomasville. Each of these neighborhoods has high rates of poverty, around 35%. As a point of comparison the rate of poverty for the state of Georgia is 12.1%. The threshold for poverty is income under $19,807 for a FAMILY OF FOUR.

    On your ride on the 16 bus you'll go through the downtown and then turn into the Old Fourth Ward. When you start down the hill with the Civic Center on your left and Georgia Power on your right you are in the Old Fourth Ward. Look closely at the Old Fourth Ward. What happens as you travel north and east? How does the terrain change? Does the neighbor show signs of gentrification? The 16 bus then goes through the neighborhoods of Poncey-Highland, Virginia-Highland, and Morningside. What happens? Based on your observations what would you guess the poverty rate is in Virginia-Highland or Morningside? What about average family income?

    What I want you to do in this assignment is chronicle the material manifestations of poverty and wealth. As we discussed in the first week of class it not an accident that neighborhoods in the United States are hyper-segregated or so few people marry across the color line or that CEO's of the Fortune 100 companies are almost all white men.

    What do you see in each of these neighborhoods - Pawn and booze shops, yuppie restaurants, big single homes with perfectly manicured front lawns, empty trash strewn parking lots, prostitutes, joggers, Porsches or clunkers? Why are some neighborhoods rich and some poor? And how is wealth connected to wealth, color, power and inequality?

    Part 1 - I want you to take close, detailed notes about everything and everybody you see as you ride on these different bus routes. What was the racial mix on the bus? Are you able to say anything about the class background of the folks on the bus? Were they decked out in Versace, three-piece suits or sporting a Bell South or Marriott uniform? Take nothing for granted. Try to look AND see using a sociological perspective. Did the physical aspects of the neighborhood change as you passed through them and if so how? Who had grass? Where did you see trash? Did you see apartments or single homes? Did intersections serves as a hangouts and if so who was hanging out, how old were they and what were these folks doing? Who was out and about and what were they doing? What were the retail establishments like? What differences did you notice in the ways the residences were built?

    Part 2 - Now I want you to link your observations to the readings and theories we have been discussing in class. How might the authors we have been reading explain the how class, race residence intersect? Drawing from the readings and theories we discussed in class you must pull together your own sociological narrative that succinctly explains why groups live where they do. These articles address specific issues of wealth, power and inequality.

    Your paper should be mostly a theoretical explanation of your observations.

    You can download a bus schedule of the 16 and the 49 at: www.itsmarta.com or you can go to the Five Points Station and get a schedule.

    This four page typed paper is due Week 13. You should have a cover page (this is NOT page one) and references. You should use at least five references for this paper.

    You may find these words helpful when you think about your analysis:

    Redlining

    Residential discrimination

    Disinvestment

    Institutional racism

    Gentrification

    Mismatch hypothesis

    Tipping point






    Race Talkin’ in Private

    Professor Charles A. Gallagher


    First things first – make sure you read Race Talk to prepare for this assignment.

    This assignment requires you to engage in a method of social research called participant observation. This type of sociological research requires that you (as the researcher) observe participants in natural settings. You are to collect data informally and covertly, that is, without your participants knowing you are carrying out a research project. When you are getting a haircut or talking with your friends or hangin’ at a party, eating on campus or watching TV with roommates you should be taking mental notes about what people are saying about race relations in the United States. What I want you to do is examine how individuals talk about race relations in private, informal, naturally occurring settings. You can collect your data in a few ways. If you are watching the news and someone makes a comment about race and crime or sport and race or starts to talk about “those people” listen, then engage the person about what they said. Try to inject a question about whiteness into the conversation. As the discussion ends excuse yourself (go to the bathroom or the kitchen) and write down what you heard. You must take field notes in order to do this assignment properly. You could also quietly take notes as people talk about the situation. Always carry a pen with you and a small notebook or some index cards you can fit in your back pocket or purse.

    You may enter the conversation but you are not to badger or bait people about race relations. You can ask individuals to clarify a point or ask them why they feel the way they do about an issue or a group. You can choose to be part of the conversation or just listen – it is up to you. The point is to accurately record the range of opinions respondents express about race relations. You may give the respondents pseudonyms (different names) to guarantee their confidentiality. I expect you to collect “race talk” from three different situations (i.e. at work or lunch table or playing on a sports team or shopping getting your hair done). Realize the conversations you hear and record need not be an exchange that is derogatory. Are people optimistic about race? Do they believe we have become a colorblind nation? Do your respondents reject or embrace stereotypes of other ethnic and racial groups? If they embrace stereotypes do they provide any explanation for their belief? Are there certain topics that seem to be controversial (interracial dating, affirmative action, drugs, immigration in Georgia)? How do they respond when you question their position?

    What I want you to do in this assignment is examine what the existing social science survey literature reports about race relations, then reflect on how your respondents discussed race. The survey literature on racial attitudes reports how different groups feel about different topics. Is what you heard consistent with those reports? The main theoretical question I want you to examine for this assignment is if “race talk” in private spheres differs from how people respond on national surveys and how whiteness fits into this narrative. While we are not able to test if individuals routinely give “socially appropriate answers” when they participate in a survey, we will be able to examine what your respondents say about a topic and compare it to national survey data.

    If differences between survey and what you found in your research exist, how do you explain those differences?

    Paper Write-Up:

    This typed paper should be four- five pages long, excluding your title page and bibliography. I want you to detail the exchanges you heard at each of the three research sites. You are to provide me with quotes that are as detailed as possible. The write-up for each place where the exchange took place need not be more that half or two-thirds a page. In the remaining space you are to draw on existing survey research and compare the views expressed by your respondents and trends in the survey literature. Are your respondents’ views outside of mainstream public opinion? Based on your observations and what the survey literature suggests do you think people are honest about their views on race relations? Do they self-censor? Do you think that individuals interviewed for surveys give social appropriate answers? Why or why not?

    Now how does whiteness play out in all this? Was whiteness invisible, was it contested, defended, was it viewed as a liability or was it ignored?

    You MUST compare your responses with the social science survey literature. In addition to writing a great paper, you must have at least TEN sources to receive full credit for this assignment.

    DUE WEEK 7 .

    You can find a wealth of survey data on-line:

    The Kaiser Family Foundation

    Gallup

    NORC

    Google (put in race, racial attitudes or race relations as your search terms).


    Check out this site on racial attitudes as well:

    http://tigger.uic.edu/~krysan/racialattitudes.htm

    START THIS PROJECT TODAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in Race and Urban Studies: Deviant Behavior
    Assignment:>
    Research Paper (12-15 pages). The bulk of your grade is tied up in this project. This paper specifically addresses the CTW component of this course and is due on the last day of class in its final form. The creation of this final paper will take place in stages throughout the semester. The dates that each component is due to me are spelled out in the schedule portion of the syllabus. The components include:

    - A two page proposal for the research, detailing your chosen topic and its relevance
    - The draft of the introduction (2-3 pages)
    - The body draft (5-7 pages)
    - The conclusion draft (2-3 pages)
    - An annotated bibliography (3-4 pages)
    - The final paper (12-15 pages)
    -
    As I will give you full edits and constructive suggestions for improvement at each stage, you will have the opportunity to perfect the paper by the time it reaches completion. We will discuss the details of this project early and often.



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in Race and Urban Studies:Educational Sociology
    Assignment:>
    1. Three written exams (including a non-cumulative final) are worth 30% of your grade each. These exams will be based on written essays and students will be expected to revise each exam at least once. The remaining ten percent of the final grade will be based on a subjective evaluation of your class participation. This can be based on participation in class or during office hours.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in Race and Urban Studies: Activism, Protest, & Revolution
    Assignment:>
    Paper assignment: I will discuss the paper assignment in more detail during the first two weeks of class. I will ask you to use social movement theory to explain the emergence of a social movement, the frames or tactics used by a movement, or why individuals participate in the movement. You must use one of the theories discussed in class in the paper. Do not just describe a social movement.
    The paper must be double-spaced and must include at least 5 references. The paper must be typewritten, double spaced, and include references to the readings. Make sure you use proper grammar and spelling.

    The paper is due March 24th. It will be graded and returned to you with comments. At that point, you have the option to revise the paper and resubmit it to me by April 14th. The first draft of you paper grade will be worth 40% of you total paper grade (100pts) and the final draft will be worth 60%. If you choose not to revise your paper, the grade on your first draft will become you final grade. NOTE: Although you have the option to revise your paper, the “first draft” should be thought out and written as a “final” paper!

    Reaction essays: Three times during the semester you are required to write a 1-2 page reaction essay to one or more of the readings assigned for a particular day. It is up to you what days/readings you write a reaction to. These essays are NOT summaries of the readings or opinion pieces. Rather, your essay should consist of an intelligent and informed reaction to and/or an analysis / critique of the article(s). You may, however, include your own informed and relevant thoughts, questions, and concerns about the article in the essay. As the course moves forward and with each essay, students should develop more skills to write critical reactions. Therefore, the first reaction will be worth 10pts, the second 15pts, and the third 25pts.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in Race and Urban Studies: Metropolitan Atlanta
    Assignment:>
    3. Evaluation of “Metropolitan Frontiers” exhibit at the Atlanta History Center (130 West Paces Ferry Road, 404 814-4000). You write a 4-5 page paper in which you discuss and critique the content, design, and effectiveness of the “Metropolitan Frontiers” exhibit. You visit the exhibit the class night of January 25 and read the book, Atlanta: An Illustrated History, before writing your paper. Due: February 8. Since this is a CTW course, undergraduates will submit a draft of their paper and receive feedback on their writing and then they will turn in a final version of this written assignment.



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Sociology
    Course Name: Critical Thinking Through Writing in Race and Urban Studies:Urban Sociology
    Assignment:>
    1. Analytic Essays. Through out the course you will be assigned THREE analytic essays. (Five-page, double-spaces, types and stabled: one-inch margins, 12 pt font). These essays will be based on our class readings (Wacquant) and discussions. You are assigned one of these essays for each subtopic of the course (see course calendar).No extra reading will be required. For each essay, I will want you to answer a specific question. The three essay questions will be distributed in the next few weeks, so you can organize the required class readings around them. NOTE: I will only accept hardcopy – please do not send me your paper via email. Due dates are as follows: … (The essay questions will be handed out in class one week before the due date for the first two essays and two weeks before the due date for the third. I will also post the essay questions on uLearn). Revisions: For all of these essays, you have the option of re-writing if you are unhappy with your grade. Re-writes are due one week after essays are returned to you.

    2. Book Report.. Eight pages, double-spaced, typed and stabled; one-inch margins, 12 pt font. On your own you will read Mary Pattillo’s Black on the Block. For this report you will (1) summarize the book’s content; (2) discuss the author’s argument – i.e. what is she telling us Bronzeville; (3) review her method for gathering evidence to support her argument; (4) describe what she finds from her evidence; and (5) discuss her conclusion. This will be due on…. I would strongly suggest you start reading this book early on in the semester so you have plenty of time to get the report done. NOTE: I will only accept hardcopy – please do not send me your paper via email



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Introduction to the Study of Literary Texts
    Assignment:>
    -The first informal CTW assignment will require students to read all but the final paragraph of a story. Students will then be asked to write down the ending of the story as they imagine it; they will be intrigued if not shocked by the actual ending; at the very least, students will need to think of the story from an unusual vantage point and will need to pay very close attention to the story's subtleties, including the way it engages with cultural motifs.
    -In another informal assignment, students will be asked to imagine how one of our authors (a female poet/nun from late 17th-century Mexico) would respond to a contemporary feminist treatise by a Puerto Rican writer. Doing so will require students to process and compare currents of thought expressed by authors writing in very different times and places, but who actually have much in common intellectually.

    Rational:
    In the first example of a CTW assignment, students will be required to think of a reading in an unexpected way, ie., as the person producing or completing a given text. Immediately they will have to activate a different mental process than the more passive, readerly process they may be familiar with. It is our hope that this exercise will encourage students to interact in more active ways with the text at hand, and consequently help them attain greater critical reading skills.

    The second example will require students to recall facts and concepts from one moment in the semester and apply them in a new context; by imagining one author's response to a different author's, students will more clearly understand that much of what they're reading is actually a conversation between writers/thinkers who are responding critically to one another; it is our hope that this exercise will encourage active critical thinking skills because it will require students to think creatively about what they are learning and to apply intellectual concepts, rather than just having them memorize these concepts.

    Ultimately, students of Spanish who demonstrate and improve their engagement in critical thinking through writing will gain a better understanding of the intellectual conversations that have taken place among Spanish-language writers over the past several hundred years, and they will be better equipped to find and express their own voices and perspectives in light of these conversations.


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Span for International Business
    Assignment:>
    In order to contextualize certain cultural aspects, the course will use excerpts from literary texts found in "Visiones." The assignments consist in developing an essay (2-2.5 pages, double space, Times New Roman), one of the discussion themes located at the end of the excerpt indicated on the syllabus. The essay should be an exposition on your ideas on the theme. The essay cannot consist of a simple summary of the text and should avoid excessive use of quotations/statistics or other information from outside sources. Two of the assignments can be rewritten in accordance to CTW guidelines. The assignments will not be accepted after the due date.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Medieval and Early Renaissance Spanish Literature
    Assignment:>
    Each student will prepare a study guide containing content and critical questions reflecting themes and stylistic techniques employed in the text and point out differences in these ideas from texts studied earlier in the course for class discussion on the text. The study guide is to be given to each member of the class the day before the assignment. (3-5 content questions and 3 critical/analytical questions). The student who prepares the study guide will lead the class through the questions and engage the class in discussion.
    Each student will turn in a typed version of the study guide on the day the text is read. I will return these to you making suggestions and indicating grammatical/content errors which should be corrected and turned in by the next class. 20% of CTW grade.

    Each student will also orally present a critical article on one of the texts read in class giving a summary of the main ideas and including his/her opinion concerning the validity of the article. (10-15 minutes) The student will engage the class in a discussion about the article. The typed form of the oral presentation will be handed in and will be part of the CTW component of this class. The typed form of the report will be edited for suggestions and corrections and returned to the student who will have a chance to correct and revise the report to be turned in the next class period. 10% of CTW grade


    Rational:
    Same


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Spanish Novel 20th Century
    Assignment:>
    The e-portfolio will consist of daily assignments sent via email. The purpose of the e-porfolio is to use the assignments as a kind of informal writing space for reflection on specific topics. The topics will be provided by the professor and will serve as “provocations” to stimulate thought on the readings and to explore doubts, uncertainties, and problems the novels propose about the human condition. I will offer prompts that will range from quotations, microthemes, aesthetic questions, peer responses, etc. The ideas in your responses may be refined to be used later as the starting point for your final paper.

    A précis is basically a summary of a secondary source. In it, you should address what the article says and how it says it. Remember, a secondary source is not an internet website, not Wikipedia or Encarta, not a dictionary, and not an encyclopedia. A secondary source is a book, an article from an academic journal, a chapter in a book, a critical essay, etc. that proposes a critical evaluation of the studied work and which supports—not substitutes—your own analysis.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Special Topics: Spanish Literature
    Assignment:>
    The e-portfolio will consist of daily assignments sent via email. The purpose of the e-porfolio is to use the assignments as a kind of informal writing space for reflection on specific topics. The topics will be provided by the professor and will serve as “provocations” to stimulate thought on the readings and to explore doubts, uncertainties, and problems the novels propose about the human condition. I will offer prompts that will range from quotations, microthemes, aesthetic questions, peer responses, etc. The ideas in your responses may be refined to be used later as the starting point for your final paper.

    The final research paper should be 8-10 pages in length, typewritten, double-spaced, with 1” margins, in 12 point Times New Roman font. It should include at least 4 secondary sources that, along with the format of the paper, should follow the stylistic rules of the MLA Handbook (6th ed.) A “borrador” of the final paper will be turned in before the final “revised” paper as part of a peer review. Remember, a secondary source is not an internet website, not Wikipedia or Encarta, not a dictionary, and not an encyclopedia. A secondary source is a book, an article from an academic journal, a chapter in a book, a critical essay, etc. that proposes a critical evaluation of the studied work and which supports—not substitutes—your own analysis.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Contemporary Latin American Novel
    Assignment:>
    There are two take-home tests (mid-term and final), each of which covers one half of the material studied in class. Each test includes brief essay questions, and on the first test students will have the option of re-writing 3 answers to get up to 5% extra points on the final grade. There is also a Final Paper, either an essay based on questions provided by the instructor, or a research paper on an original topic selected by the student after consultation with the instructor. The final paper must be 8-10 double-space pages, and it must include at least ONE bibliographical reference (critical article or book on the topic) NOT from the Internet.

    Rational:
    Same


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Latin American Short Story
    Assignment:>
    Students must come to class ready to discuss the short stories assigned for that day. In addition, each student is required to write one ficha técnica (a summary in a format provided by the instructor) about one of the short stories read in class. This “ficha técnica” will be typed and photocopied for distribution to the rest of the class on the assigned day, so that by the end of the semester all students will have a dossier of “fichas técnicas” to be used for studying or for future reference. The “ficha técnica” will receive a grade of Pass or Fail; a grade of Fail will lower the final grade for the course by 10%.

    In addition to the “ficha técnica,” there will be a take-home mid-term exam and a take-home final, each covering one half of the course material and consisting of various brief essay questions and identifications. On the take-home mid-term exam students will have the option of re-writing 3 answers to get up to 5% extra points on the final grade. There will also be a 6-8-page final paper on a topic either selected by the student or from a list of topics provided by the instructor.


    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Hispanic Caribbean Literature and Culture
    Assignment:>
    -The first informal CTW assignment will require students to read all but the final paragraph of a story. Students will then be asked to write down the ending of the story as they imagine it; they will be intrigued if not shocked by the actual ending; at the very least, students will need to think of the story from an unusual vantage point and will need to pay very close attention to the story's subtleties, including the way it engages with cultural motifs.
    -In another informal assignment, students will be asked to imagine how one of our authors (a 19th-century Cuban Romantic poet) would respond to a contemporary fictional representation of this author. Doing so will require students to process and compare currents of thought expressed by authors writing in very different times and places, but who actually have much in common intellectually.

    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Afro-Hispanic Literature & Culture
    Assignment:>
    In one assignment, students will be asked to analyze and compare the various interests different people held in a slave society. For example, students will analyze the role of carnivals from both the master's and the slave's perspective and will comment on the value of carnivals for each.

    In another assignment (on a short story about the squalid conditions in parts of Puerto Rico), students will be asked to describe a problematic and at times disturbing fictional character in terms of his interests, values, perspectives, etc.; in a follow-up to this assignment, the students will be asked to describe themselves and their own values and cultural baggage based on the character description they wrote for part 1.

    Rational:
    For the first assignment, the case study of carnivals in the Afro-Hispanic world will enable students to understand both this particular type of event as well as aspects of plantation and slave societies in general. This is so inasmuch as carnivals were important for both slaves and masters, but usually for very different reasons. By asking students to describe the value of carnival for both slave and master, they will have to think critically about this particular issue, and will have to engage with the relevant texts in ways that call on them to process and synthesize relevant information.

    The second assignment will force students to identify and comment on their values and perspectives, whether political, personal, cultural, or otherwise. Since this is a 2-part assignment, students will have to undergo a paradigm shift: from focusing on a fictional character in part 1, to focusing on themselves in part 2. If all goes well, students will come to understand that their own interpretive, critical filter is as important as the people they are learning about in the stories, and will be better in tune with the rapport between themselves and what they read.


    Major: Spanish
    Course Name: Contemporary Mexican Fiction
    Assignment:>
    In one CTW assignment (which may be re-written), students will be asked to outline Octavio Paz's vision of history in his landmark study, The Labyrinth of Solitude. Paz does not explicitly provide this vision, so the assignment demands that students read with a critical eye and then synthesize Paz's ideas in a coherent and convincing manner.
    Another CTW assignment will require students to identify and analyze a Mexican novelist's representation of life in the United States. In doing so, students will need to take into account their own preconceptions about Mexicans and North Americans, and how these perceive each other.

    Rational:
    Same


    Major: Speech
    Course Name: Persuasion
    Assignment:>
    Please see the syllabus to see how the five assignments build off of one another to emphasize critical thinking.

    ******************************************

    Assignment Two (Critical Assessment of the Audience) All communication messages suggest and/or implicate an audience. Sometimes these audiences are understood as preexisting demographics or masses and at other times these audiences are “constituted.” Often audiences who are not “intended” to consume the message are drawn to them. In this initial assignment students are to critically assess the audience for whom their particular instances of persuasion were constructed. Most of you will not have access to knowing the thoughts of the people who gave life to the event you are examining. As such, you will need to use clues within the text to compose your argument. You might first consider if there is a presumed preexisting audience or if there is one desired by the message creator (perhaps both?)? In making this assessment, be certain to offer proof as to how you came to your conclusions about the audience. What modes of identification are invoked in the message or medium to suggest the audience you identify might be the one desired or invoked? Are these forms of proof subtle or overt? How does the audience that is imagined shape the form and content of the message? You might also consider what is absent in the message to indicate, through negation, that you are correct (or at least close) in your assessment. This paper should be about four to five pages in length, not including the bibliography.

    **********************************************

    Assignment Three (Critical Assessment of Context) All communication messages occur within specific cultural and historical contexts. In this second assignment, you are asked to assess the context in which your message was created or materialized. What is the time period in which this is constructed? Does the assumed audience play a role in establishing the context? Are there major world events that altered the cultural context in which this message is understood? Again, this assignment should generally be thought of as composing an argument for the context you are asserting. Since you cannot detail every cultural, economic, social, and political event taking place at a given historical moment, it is up to you to critically assess those elements of the context that matter most to this instance of persuasion. This paper should be about four to five pages in length, not including the bibliography.



    Rational:
    By dividing the major projects in each of these classes into smaller components students are able to focus on one subject over the duration of a semester. Giving deep focus to one topic over the course of the semester affords students the opportunity to illustrate their capacities for critical thinking and provides space for expanding and improving their critical skills. The coupling of smaller assignments with additional theoretical, textual, and methodological exposure as the semester continues allows for a more progressively critical posture towards the object of analysis. More specifically, the department will focus on the stark development that transpires between the first of these assignments at the start of the semester with the final capstone project at the end.


    Major: Speech
    Course Name: Communication and Diversity
    Assignment:>
    Please see the syllabus to see how each of these assignments builds off of one another to foster critical thinking.

    *************************************************

    Assignment One: (Identification of Group or Culture) Students should identify a group or culture that is “unlike” them in order to explore the relationship between diversity and communication for the semester. Students should be as specific as possible in their selection (so, perhaps “Christian Scientists,” but not simply “Christians”) and provide ample justification for their choice. Based on initial discussions on privilege and difference, students will be asked to detail some of the assumed differences and similarities they have about their selected group. This initial assignment is meant to orient students immediately to the ways in which communication creates and limits our understandings of people and culture.

    Assignment Two: (Critical Heuristic) Students will research approximately five journal essays about their selected group or culture. Ideally, of course, these will be communication articles that are connected to their topic (even broadly, to larger identity categories such as race, religion, sexuality, class, political affiliation, ability, etc.). If the articles come from outside the discipline, students will connect these essays to the practice of communication.

    Assignment Three: (Examination of Representations) Students will perform an analysis of how their group or culture has been portrayed in the public sphere. Using the heuristic outlined in assignment two, students will analyze films, newspaper coverage, magazines, television programs (or any other public mediation) about their group. Students should move beyond mere description of a group to critically assess how communication constitutes specific identities.

    Assignment Four: (Personal Interview) Students will interview a member of their selected group or culture to add or alter their understanding of how communication practices help shape the ways in which we understand those identities. Students should select interviewees who will supplement their work, not simply a person they happen to know in class or whom they are related or acquainted. In conducting the interview, students should centralize at all times the practice of communication and how ways of communicating about a group (or the ways the group itself communicates) shapes understandings of that culture. Students will then complete a short paper detailing their findings from the interview.

    Assignment Five (Major Capstone Project) In this final project, students will develop and complete a communication project that critically engages their selected culture. Students are to develop a project aimed towards their culture that highlights a communication event. These projects should be in conversation with the other materials that have been collected throughout the semester. Although students are required to formally offer project reports during the term, it is strongly advised they meet with the instructor early in the semester to discuss grading procedures and possible approaches to their project.


    Rational:
    By dividing the major projects in each of these classes into smaller components students are able to focus on one subject over the duration of a semester. Giving deep focus to one topic over the course of the semester affords students the opportunity to illustrate their capacities for critical thinking and provides space for expanding and improving their critical skills. The coupling of smaller assignments with additional theoretical, textual, and methodological exposure as the semester continues allows for a more progressively critical posture towards the object of analysis. More specifically, the department will focus on the stark development that transpires between the first of these assignments at the start of the semester with the final capstone project at the end.


    Major: Social Work
    Course Name: SW 3330 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
    Assignment:>
    ASSIGNMENT 1
    HUMAN BEHAVIOR & THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT
    DUE MONDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2008 (at the beginning of class)
    Instructor: Lionel Scott
    PART I INSTRUCTIONS (Application of Ecological and Systems Theory Concepts):
    Read the story of Reggie Kelsey (see handout) carefully and think about 5 key concepts of System Theory or Ecological Theory that you believe are illustrated in the story. Using the Table provided below, identify the key concept and the way that it is illustrated or applicable. In the last column, please identify the page number where the key concept and application you identify can be located. One example from Reggie’s story is provided below. Any of the key concepts discussed on pages 12 – 19 of your textbook can be applied. It is important that you provide more than a one or two word description of how a key concept is applicable. Note: A key concept can be used more than once as long as the application is different. Each student may arrive at different conclusions about how a key concept is applicable in the story. Please write clearly. (Worth 20 points each)


    Key Concept Application in “Betty’s Story”
    Page #
    *Ex. Relationship

    In talking with a school social worker, Reggie stated that he often thought about killing someone. Relationships involve communication in order to meet a client’s needs. As such, this is an example of a relationship.
    221
    1







    2






    3











    4






    5





    *Example


    PART II INSTRUCTIONS: On pages 19 – 21 of your textbook, people’s involvement with multiple systems and the interactions between systems is discussed. Closely read how the textbook differentiates the three basic types of systems – micro, mezzo, and macro – and how they interact. In the story of Reggie, numerous systems are identified. Identify 10 systems at the micro, mezzo, and/or macro level in Reggie’s story using the grid below, including the page number (see Example*). In addition, using the attached ecomap, label each system you identify in one of the circles in the ecomap and draw the appropriate line as illustrated in class handouts and exercises. Discuss how at least three of the systems you identify interact with one another. Please type (double space). As a general rule, your response should be 1 – 2 pages long. However, what is more important than the length is how your response meets certain criteria: Critical Thinking, Grammar, Development, and Knowledge. (Worth 25 points)


    System Type of System?
    Micro, Mezzo, or Macro

    Page #
    *Independent Living Skills Counselor (Beamer) Micro 186, 194




















    *Example



    PART III INSTRUCTIONS: On pages 10 – 11 and Highlight 1.3 (pages 23 – 24) of your textbook, critical thinking about value and ethical issues is discussed. Consider the final outcome in Reggie’s story.

    A. Identify two ethical dilemmas or violations on the part of individuals and organizations in charge of Reggie’s care that are evident in his story. Use National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics or other readings to support your answer. Does Reggie bear any responsibility for his final outcome? Why or Why not?

    B. What biological, psychological, or social aspects of development do you think are most relevant to Reggie’s final outcome (see pages 21 – 22 as a starting point)? Any biological, psychological, or social aspect of infancy, childhood, or adolescence covered this semester are eligible (for example, family, cognitive development, etc.). Why? Was this aspect of his development adequately addressed? Explain your answer.

    C. What alternative actions could have been taken by the individuals and/or organizations that interacted with Reggie? Weigh the pros and cons of each alternative you identify? What is the most ethical decision that could have been made to possibly influence a more positive outcome in Reggie’s life?

    Note: A rough draft of Part III of Assignment 1 is due on October 6. The rough draft is to be submitted on Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) website (further details and instructions will be given). Feedback will be given through the WAC website prior to the due date for the full assignment. The feedback is to be used to improve your response to this part of the assignment. The final revised version should be typed (double space). As a general rule, your response should be 2 – 3 pages long. However, what is more important than the length is how your response meets certain criteria: Critical Thinking, Grammar, Citation, Development, and Knowledge. (Worth 35 points)


    Rational:
    The second segment of the assignment requires students to apply theoretical knowlege to a given life scenario in written format. This requires the students to synthesize certain information and integrate this information with the circumstances provided in the case study.

    The final segment of the assignment requires students to consider professional ethics in practice and to articulate possible reasoning for the outcome of the scenario. In completing this segment of the assignment, students will have an opportunity to "revise and resubmit" their work to the instructor. A rough draft of the assignment is due on October 6. The rough draft is to be submitted on Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) website (further details and instructions will be given). Feedback will be given through the WAC website by the instructor/writing consultant prior to the due date for the full assignment. The feedback is to be used to improve responses to this part of the assignment. As a general rule, responses should be 2 – 3 pages long. However, what is more important than the length is how responses meet certain criteria: Critical Thinking, Grammar, Citation, Development, and Knowledge.


    Major: Social Work
    Course Name: Human Behavior and the Social Environment II
    Assignment:>
    Final Paper
    There will be one 100-point term paper. Select a special issue in adult life and examine/analyze the topic according to its relevance to the various stages of adulthood (early, middle, and late). Examples are issues such as social class, race ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, etc. The purpose of the assignment is to explore a single issue across the life span. For example, how do issues related to gender different for a woman in her twenties compared to a woman in her sixties?

    Each student is expected to turn in a final paper that should be 7-10 double-spaced typed written pages. This paper should have at least 5 bibliographic sources from social work or related journals to support the assessment. Your papers should be written in Times New Roman, 12 point font. APA format is required for the citations and references used in the paper. Your paper will be evaluated on both content and grammar based on Grading Rubric for Social Work Writing Assignment.

    Part I: An outline of the paper outline due to professor on [INSERT DATE]. Your outline must include the topic you have selected, an explanation/justification of why think the topic should be examined (provide evidence from the literature to support your argument), and what may be the counter-arguments (again, provide evidence from the literature) against selecting the topic. The professor will provide feedback to you on your outline.

    Part II: A preliminary analysis of the topic will be due on [INSERT DATE]. This short paper (2-3 pages) will give you an opportunity to critically examine your initial research on the topic and discuss the assumptions, bias, and limitations of the existing literature that support and counter-argue your central thesis. The professor will provide feedback to you on your critical analysis of the literature review.

    Part III: Final paper due on [INSERT DATE].


    Rational:
    Same.


    Major: Social Work
    Course Name: Social Welfare Policy
    Assignment:>
    SW3930- Social Welfare Policy
    LEGISLATIVE PAPER
    CTW Assignment


    The purpose of the legislative paper is to trace the development of a social welfare policy introduced in the current Georgia legislative session. The process involves selecting a bill that is being introduced in the Georgia General Assembly. Selected topics are dependent upon which bills are introduced during the session, but may include issues involving child welfare, community development, public assistance, mental health services, disability services, civil rights or specific public services/benefits that have a direct impact on vulnerable populations.

    Major features of the paper will support students’ ability to develop critical thinking and writing skills through direct application of the course content. Students will interview key persons invested in the development and implementation of the legislative bill. Generally, regardless of the immediate focus of the bill, every bill will have some impact on a community. As such, each paper must consider the effect of the selected bill on the community environment. Pieces of this information can be obtained from speaking with legislator(s), the legislators’ aids agency representatives, or community representatives (e.g., recipients of service provisions, administrators of agencies providing services, advocacy groups.) Each student must seek the opinions of those with various viewpoints on the issue covered in the selected bill and discuss in the paper which groups and individuals are supportive or non- supportive of the bill, and the bases for their positions.

    As a CTW assignment, students may work in small groups (2-3 students) to study a particular bill, but each student must compose independent papers analyzing the issue and proposed solution. The paper will be written in 5 sections throughout the semester, giving students the opportunity to receive feedback from the instructor before the final paper submission at the end of the semester. The instructor will provide feedback on students’ work based on content requirements for each section. For each section, students will submit a draft of their work on uLearn. They will have an opportunity to revise their work based on the instructor’s comments. The dates that each section is due are presented in the syllabus. Students will be evaluated on their ability to provide a thorough description of the issue, synthesize multiple points of view on the social problem and its proposed solutions, and present a rational position either supporting or opposing the legislative bill.

    THE FINAL PAPER MUST FOLLOW THE OUTLINE BELOW

    Section 1. PROBLEM DESCRIPTION
    The introduction to the paper describes the issue being addressed in the bill. You should give some background research on the indicators (social, economic or political) that describe the problem, including factors that suggest the severity of the problem and the effects of the problem on Georgia or isolated communities within the state. Is the problem present in every community in Georgia? If not, where is it located? Why is the problem not manifested in some communities?



    Section 2. PROBLEM DEFINITION
    How did the sponsor of the bill define the problem; do other interested parties define the problem differently or the same? What social values are reflected in the definition of the problem? Are there conflicting definitions of the problem between the sponsors of the bill and other invested groups?

    Section 3. PROBLEM SOLUTION

    What solution(s) does the bill proposed to resolve the problem? What method or approach is proposed to address the problem? What specific services or benefits will come from the proposed solution? Are there any eligibility criteria for receiving benefits/services? What groups will receive services/benefits from the proposed solution, and what groups will be excluded from receiving services/benefits, and why? Is there consensus or conflict among various interested parties on what the bill proposes as a solution? What is the ultimate outcome (intended consequences) to result from the proposed solution to the problem? If the proposed solution does not eradicate the problem, then how is the bill a viable solution?

    If the bill is an amendment or modification to an existing law, cite the law that will be changed and a brief comparison as to what sections of the current law will be changed.

    To support your work, the following persons must be interviewed for your paper:

    a. One or more sponsors of the bill. (Generally, the first name on the bill is the originator of the bill. He/she will have the most knowledge about the problem and the solution proposed in the bill);

    a. Your personal state legislators (Senator and Representative) to gain their perception on
    the problem/issue being addressed by the bill and the proposed solution expressed in the bill;

    b. Two community representatives who would be affected by the bill (e.g., front line social workers, agency representative, a member of an advocacy/lobbying group, recipients of services or community residents who will be directly impacted by the bill).

    IMPLEMENTATION AND BUDGETING
    How is the service/benefit to be financed? Is this bill a funding priority for the legislature or Governor; are other bills/current programs competing for the same public dollars? What agency will have responsibility for implementing the proposed solution (e.g., what governmental agency will execute the bill)? Is the bill a priority for the administrative agency, why or why not? Are requested monetary resources adequate to fulfill the objectives expressed in the bill?

    Section 4. POLICY PROCESS
    Describe the process the bill went through during the legislative session (e.g., which committee, sub-committee was it assigned, etc)? If there were any public hearings on the bill, what individuals/groups gave testimony in the hearings? What issues were raised during the hearings by those giving testimony and/or by the legislators? Were there any lobbyists working for/against the bill? Were similar bills introduced in both chambers to address the same problem? If so, what was the purpose of this tactic? If two bills addressing the same problem progressed through both chambers of the legislature, what differences did you discern regarding the bills’ process between the Senate and the House? Were there any amendments to the bill, if so, did they change the focus of the problem in any way? Was there consensus/conflict on the bill’s amendments? What input did the Governor have on the bill’s process through the legislature?

    The above sections are the heart of the paper and careful attention should be given to it. Be analytical, not just descriptive.


    Section 5. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS
    Give your position on the bill. Discuss how this bill will/will not resolve the problem as defined by legislators and/or persons affected by the problem? Do you anticipate any unintended consequences if the bill becomes state law? What areas or sections of the bill would you recommend to modify in order to address any concerns, and what action steps would you implement to address those concerns. Similarly, what aspects of the bill are good for addressing the problem and should therefore be protected. Discuss any ethical dilemmas stemming from the bill you foresee as a social work practitioner. How will this bill enhance social justice for targeted individuals/groups? What insights did you gain from participating in the legislative process? Again, be analytical in your thinking, and not just descriptive.





    Rational:
    The School of Social Work has the goal of educating competent social work practitioners. Critical thinking and analysis are essential practice skills currently incorporated in the BSW curriculum. Of the 15 learning outcomes for the BSW program, 3 specifically refer to critical thinking: data analysis - students demonstrate critical thinking through the development of testable hypotheses and interpreting and analyzing data related to client and system problems; plan of action - students demonstrate critical thinking skills through the gathering of client information and formulating, in collaboration with the client, a plan of action for problem resolution; and experiential learning - students demonstrate critical thinking skills through a personal examination of the experiential learning in field education.

    The CTW-designated course will provide one more definitive approach to supporting students' ability to communicate, both orally and in writing, from a critical thinking perspective. Assignments will allow students to develop standard critical thinking skills (e.g., relevance, logic, significance, and precision). Using the Foundation For Critical Thinking as a resource, the assignments for CTW-designated courses will allow students to demonstrate their ability to:
    Raise important questions and issues, and articulate them concisely and precisely;

    Gather and assess relevant information, and show the ability to critically interpret it effectively;

    Using relevant criteria and standards, develop well-reasoned conclusions and solutions to issues;

    Maintain an open mind when considering alternative perspectives/ideas, assessing and evaluating assumptions, implications and practical consequences; and

    Communicate effectively with others in articulating complex situations/issues and their possible solutions/responses.

    [Adapted from Paul, R. & Elder, L (2005).The Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking – Concepts & Tools (4th ed). CA: Foundation For Critical Thinking]

    In the context of social policy, students will demonstrate critical thinking in analyzing social problems that require a legislative response, clarifying various points of view regarding the purpose, values , and potential effects among proposed policy alternatives, assessing program implementation, as well as the implications and consequences.
    It is expected that students will apply their critical thinking skills in all courses in the BSW curriculum in accordance with the overall learning outcomes for the undergraduate program, and not just CTW-designated courses.


    Major: Theatre
    Course Name: Play Analysis
    Assignment:>
    1. Work Sheet on Hamlet: The fields of information that must be included are: 1. title (year) and author, 2. setting (time and place), 3.characters' names and brief identification, 4. structure; both the divisions used (number of acts, scenes) and the overall structure (climactic, episodic, or a combination), 5. an events list (see Austin essay), 6. three elaborated themes and 7. a one-sentence concept statement for a possible production you might direct, and 8. two concise paragraphs explaining: a. How this concept was drawn from and is related to one or more of your elaborated themes and b. A few general statements of suggestions you might give to actors and designers about how your concept might be applied to their two areas of specialization in the production.

    2. In-Class Writing on Galileo: In what specific ways is this play episodic in structure and in what ways is it an example of Epic Theatre? Give a total of at least three (3) general traits of the play for the structure and three (3) general traits of the play for the type and use some specific descriptions of plot, character, language, etc. from the play to back up each general statement.



    Rational:
    The assignments in THEA 3100 are chosen to make students deal with specific critical thinking skills needed to translate dramatic texts into productions. That process at its most basic level is illustrated through the worksheet assignment, which requires students to do close readings of six plays The assignment forces students to go beyond cursory readings and assumptions about plays representing various styles, structure and historical eras and create interpretations based on specific evidence found within the plays. From these interpretations they form a concept for how they would like to see the play directed in production, and in the final section the student is asked to justify her/his production concept based on their previous interpretations and evidence within the play. Worksheets are submitted as drafts, then returned to the students for revision so they can further develop their critical thinking skills.

    In-class writing will ask students to apply concepts covered in class to the same plays assigned for the worksheets. The assignment requires them to draw spontaneously on the critical thinking skills developed through other class work in order to deal with new concepts to the six plays read in the class.


    Major: Theatre
    Course Name: Western Theatre History
    Assignment:>
    1. Critical Analysis of a Play:

    You are to write a 300-500 word analysis of one play from the following list. Your analysis should identify the play's dramatic action (but not summarize the plot in detail) and show how elements from each of the six parts of the drama as identified by Aristotle contribute to the development of that action.

    2. Microtheme on The Oresteia:

    How is The Oresteia a product of a patriarchal society? Provide a specific quote or event from the play as support of your answer.

    3. Microtheme on Cloud Nine:

    Compare the concepts of religion/spirituality expressed in the two acts of Cloud Nine. How does that change in view relate to the changes in the family unit during the course of the play?


    Rational:
    The assignments in THEA 4070 Western Theatre History are chosen to make students deal with historical and literary materials in ways that go beyond "conventional wisdom" and other assumptions to make educated determinations of what those texts actually are and what, if any impact they can have on praxis. The critical analysis assignment is designed to make them apply a specific approach, structural analysis, in ways that carry them beyond surface, subjective reactions. Microthemes are designed to challenge basic assumptions about the dramatic a canon, theatrical practice and social issues. The microtheme assignments will keep students writing throughout the semester in a form that supplies almost instant feedback so they can improve critical thinking and writing skills. Longer assignments like the critical analysis and the research paper are first submitted in draft form so students can improve writing and critical analysis skills by responding to instructor input.


    Major: Women's Studies
    Course Name: Feminist Theories
    Assignment:>
    Course Requirements and Grading
    Analytical papers: Eight papers will account for 40% of final grade (you will need to do eight out of the assigned nine papers). Papers need to be 1-2 pages in length. Students must prepare papers on the readings that are assigned the day the paper is due. Late papers will be downgraded.
    Students are to engage the text assigned for the class period in an analytical and logical manner. Students must pick one idea or theme of the readings and discuss it analytically. There are three main objectives for these papers. First, these papers prepare the student for class discussion. The second objective is to for students to develop critical writing skills. I will give feedback and suggestions on your papers so that you can develop your writing skills throughout the semester. The third objective is to develop critical thinking skills, such as the ability to discuss a text logically and systematically. By writing these short essays, you will train yourself to read a text looking for key arguments.

    Final analytical paper. 5-6 pages. 20% of grade.
    Students will prepare their own question for this assignment based on the model of the midterm. Rather than answering the questions the teacher has posed, the student will formulate a question that calls for an engagement with multiple authors. Learning to construct a meaningful question and then answering it will provide students with the basic skill needed to write longer research papers and reflective essays. Formulating research topics and questions upon which to build a research paper is one of the most difficult exercises for students. This step-by-step approach is designed to build on earlier writing/analytical skills developed in the weekly papers and the midterm. By the end of the term the student will be able to identify relevant theoretical questions or paradoxes within a range of texts and will be able to construct a short essay (5-6 pages) that is coherent, logical and persuasive.



    Rational:
    SAME


    Major: Women's Studies
    Course Name: Senior Research
    Assignment:>
    2) Students must turn in material by the agreed-upon due dates. Since this course predominantly focuses on the creation of a major paper, the paper requirements will include various due dates throughout the semester. These due dates comprise dates both that various readings must be completed as well as the material involved in writing and revising a major paper. Various due dates will include:
    a. Due date for working thesis
    b. Due date for bibliography
    c. Due date for outline
    d. Due date for introduction
    e. Due date for completed first draft
    f. Due date for Final Paper
    g. If necessary, another due date for a revised draft


    Rational:
    These assignments will allow students to demonstrate their engagement in critical thinking through writing through their development of a major paper about a topic germane to their future research interests. Through breaking down the process of writing and revising, we will improve student engagement in critical thinking through writing.


    Major: Women's Studies
    Course Name: Internship
    Assignment:>
    2) Interns will keep a journal, in which they reflect upon their daily work in a clear and systematic fashion. The journal might also tie together the work experience and professional goals of the students (20%).

    3) Interns will also write a research paper (7-10 pp.) on a topic related to the organization’s work. The paper should follow an acceptable academic style (APA, MLA, etc.) and should include academic references, such as books and articles in recognized journals. The paper might also include interviews with on-site personnel and/or publications by the organizations. The paper should be analytical and not merely report on the day-to-day activities of the intern. It must also go through a revision process, in which the advisor has the opportunity to read a complete draft before the student submits the final paper (50%).


    Rational:
    These assignments will allow students to demonstrate their engagement in critical thinking through writing through their development of a paper that combines practical experience with academic knowledge. The necessity for revision in this process will improve the student's engagement in critical thinking as well as writing. Additionally, the journal requirement enables the student to practice writing and critical thinking skills in less rigorous fashion, which can aid them in applying these skills to more formal writing situations.